Adam Shaw

UK Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt fired back at a claim by the outgoing French ambassador to the U.S. that Britain’s influence in Washington, D.C. has “vanished” — saying the U.K. “will not take any lessons” from the French in having good relations with America.

“Mon cher ami [Gerard Araud] I am sure you enjoyed making hay with the UK’s temporary Brexit travails but until there is a French President’s bust in the Oval Office we will not take any lessons in having good relations with Washington,” Hunt tweeted, along with a picture of President Trump and UK Prime Minister Theresa May standing next to the bust of former PM Winston Churchill.

TRUMP TO VISIT UK, FRANCE IN JUNE FOR D-DAY ANNIVERSARY

His tweet was attached with a winking emoji, indicating the tweet was perhaps meant to be taken lightly — but it comes after Araud, who is leaving his post as France’s representative to Washington, said that British influence has disappeared.

“The UK has vanished,” Araud told The Financial Times. “The British ambassador told me — and I loved it — that every time the British military is meeting with the American military, the Americans are talking about the French.”

Araud has been on something of a tear as he departs the capital, giving a series of interviews in which he has weighed in on current affairs in often-undiplomatic language.

In an interview with Foreign Policy last week, he drew a stark contrast between the presidencies of Barack Obama and Trump.

FRENCH AMBASSADOR BLASTS ‘BIG MOUTH’ TRUMP, SAYS HE READS ‘BASICALLY NOTHING’

“On one side, you had this ultimate bureaucrat, an introvert, basically a bit aloof, a restrained president. A bit arrogant also but basically somebody who every night was going to bed with 60-page briefings and the next day they were sent back annotated by the president,” he said, referring to Obama.

“And suddenly you have this president who is an extrovert, really a big mouth, who reads basically nothing or nearly nothing, with the interagency process totally broken and decisions taken from the hip basically.”

Outgoing Ambassador of France to the United States Gerard Araud has said the British influence in Washington has "vanished." (Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Outgoing Ambassador of France to the United States Gerard Araud has said the British influence in Washington has “vanished.” (Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Both Britain and France have had tumultuous relationships with the U.S. since Trump entered the White House. The White House announced Tuesday that Trump will travel to both countries in June to mark the anniversary of the D-Day landings — which will include a state visit to London.

Trump has repeatedly backed Britain’s departure from the European Union, and recently called for a “large scale Trade Deal with the United Kingdom” once it leaves, but has also criticized May’s handling of the negotiations.

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Meanwhile, Trump described French President Emmanuel Macron as “perfect” when he visited the White House last year, before the relationship soured over issues such as NATO funding, tariffs and Trump’s decision to begin withdrawing from Syria.

Macron would go on to mull a European army to “protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America” — which led Trump to point to the French surrender to Germany in World War II, and to knock Macron’s low approval ratings.

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Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon on Wednesday announced plans for a second referendum on Scottish independence before 2021, less than five years after Scots rejected the vote on separating from the rest of the United Kingdom.

Sturgeon, leader of the pro-independence Scottish National Party, cited the uncertainty around Britain’s departure from the European Union as a motivating factor for the push.

PELOSI UNDERMINES TRUMP ABROAD ON US-UK TRADE DEAL, SAYS ‘NO CHANCE’ IF BREXIT HURTS IRISH PEACE ACCORD

“If we are to safeguard Scotland’s interests, we cannot wait indefinitely. That is why I consider that a choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this Parliament,” she told Scottish lawmakers in Holyrood.

First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon issues a statement on Brexit and independence in the main chamber at the Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, Wednesday April 24, 2019.  (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon issues a statement on Brexit and independence in the main chamber at the Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, Wednesday April 24, 2019.  (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The next Scottish election is scheduled for May 2021.

“If Scotland is taken out of the E.U., the option of a referendum on independence within that timescale must be open to us. That would be our route to avoiding the worst of the damage Brexit will do,” she said

Scotland voted to remain within the United Kingdom in a 2014 referendum by a vote of 55-45 percent, but a majority of the country also voted to remain within the European Union in 2016 by a margin of 62-38 percent — although the U.K. as a whole voted to leave.

It has led Sturgeon and others in favor of independence to argue that Scotland is being taken out of the E.U. without its permission — giving them a reason for a second referendum.

That process has been dogged by complications and delays, with the U.K. Parliament voting down Prime Minister Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement multiple times, leading to a delay of Britain’s departure until as late as Oct. 31. That vote has also seen calls for a second referendum amid the lengthy delay.

Any push for Scottish independence would require approval by the British government. May’s government has consistently rebuffed calls for a second Brexit referendum, saying that such a move would be a betrayal of the British people’s vote. It would, therefore, be unlikely to also grant a second Scottish referendum, particularly as May’s Conservative Party has been consistently opposed to Scottish independence, although May’s predecessor David Cameron’s government agreed to the 2014 referendum.

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Scottish Secretary David Mundell said in a statement Wednesday that Scots “voted decisively in 2014 to remain part of the U.K., on a promise that the referendum would settle the issue for a generation.”

“Instead of respecting that result, Nicola Sturgeon continues to press for divisive constitutional change when it is clear that most people in Scotland do not want another independence referendum,” he said. “The UK government will stand up for them.”

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A top Republican congressman is firing back at Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., in response to her claim that the Department of Veteran Affairs provides “some of the highest quality care” to veterans.

“Apparently ignorance is bliss when it comes to Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and her views of VA,” Rep. Phil Roe, the ranking Republican on the Committee on Veterans’ Affairs, said in a statement to Fox News. “It is evident that she paid little attention to the scandalous treatment of veterans that occurred several years ago by some in the very agency created to serve them.”

OCASIO-CORTEZ DECLARES VA ‘ISN’T BROKEN,’ ALREADY PROVIDES TOP-NOTCH CARE

Ocasio-Cortez claimed during a town hall last week that the VA “isn’t broken” despite the scandals that have plagued the agency over the last decade.

“All I can think of is that classic refrain that my parents always taught me growing up, is that: ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,’” she said in New York, as part of her argument against privatizing aspects of the agency.

“That is the opening approach we have seen when it comes to privatization, it’s the idea that this thing that isn’t broken, this thing that provides some of the highest quality care to our veterans somehow needs to be fixed, optimized, tinkered with until we don’t even recognize it anymore,” she said, in comments first reported by The Washington Examiner.

Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn., is calling out Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., for her comments about the VA. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Rep. Phil Roe, R-Tenn., is calling out Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., for her comments about the VA. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

“They are trying to fix the VA for pharmaceutical companies, they are trying to fix the VA for insurance corporations, and, ultimately they are trying to fix the VA for a for-profit healthcare industry that does not put people or veterans first,” she said. “And so we have a responsibility to protect it.”

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments were aimed at Trump administration efforts to expand choice and private health care options in the VA health care system, particularly via the MISSION Act — signed into law by President Trump last year.

But Roe, R-Tenn., in his statement, said there has been “widespread recognition” from Democrats and Republicans that the department needed reform since the 2014 scandal that found secret wait lists, systemic neglect and veterans dying waiting to see a doctor. He noted that the MISSION Act was signed into law with bipartisan support in Congress and backing from veteran groups — but said there remains “mountains of work ahead of us still.”

“While Rep. Ocasio-Cortez and I have VA medical facilities in and near our districts with great quality ratings, not all veterans are so lucky. That’s not to mention the many student veterans across the nation who struggled to pay their bills last fall due to VA’s failure to properly process their GI Bill benefits, or the many veterans who wait years for decisions on their disability claims,” he said.

VA SECRETARY WARNS TRUMP’S SIGNATURE PROGRAM COULD COLLAPSE WITHOUT FIX

“Problems and inconsistencies like that are the definition of a system that needs fixing,” he said. “I am baffled as to how Rep. Ocasio-Cortez fails to see that.”

“When you don’t know anything about anything you should probably keep your mouth shut or everyone will know you don’t know anything,” he added.

Roe was joined in his criticism of Ocasio-Cortez by Rep. Greg Steube, R-Fla., who also serves on the committee.

“From veterans waiting 30-60 days for an appointment, suicide hotlines going to voicemail, to the rationing of medicine and vast cost overruns, this Department is failing on multiple fronts,” he said in a statement. “To say that this is the level of care those who put their lives on the line to defend our nation deserve is frankly offensive.”

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Steube noted that Ocasio-Cortez is a strong proponent of government-run, single-payer health care plans in her pushes for a Green New Deal and Medicare-for-all and suggests it is that ideological bent that leads her to view the VA in a positive light.

“As a partially disabled veteran who deals with VA frequently, I know that this department is in need of serious reform,” he said. “But, it doesn’t surprise me that Representative Ocasio-Cortez won’t admit it — she advocates for government run health care for all every day, so if she were to admit the failures of the only current system of government run health care, she would have to admit faults within her own plan.”

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Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., claimed during a recent town hall event that the Department of Veterans Affairs “isn’t broken” and is actually providing “some of the highest quality” care to veterans.

“All I can think of is that classic refrain that my parents always taught me growing up, is that: ‘if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,’” she said in New York, as part of her argument against privatizing aspects of the scandal-scarred agency’s work.

VA SECRETARY WARNS TRUMP’S SIGNATURE PROGRAM COULD COLLAPSE WITHOUT FIX

“That is the opening approach we have seen when it comes to privatization, it’s the idea that this thing that isn’t broken, this thing that provides some of the highest quality care to our veterans somehow needs to be fixed, optimized, tinkered with until we don’t even recognize it anymore,” she said, in comments first reported by The Washington Examiner.

“They are trying to fix the VA for pharmaceutical companies, they are trying to fix the VA for insurance corporations, and, ultimately they are trying to fix the VA for a for-profit healthcare industry that does not put people or veterans first,” she said. “And so we have a responsibility to protect it.”

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments were aimed at Trump administration efforts to expand choice and private health care options in the VA health care system, particularly via the MISSION Act — signed into law by President Trump last year.

The comments are likely to raise the ire of proponents advocating VA reform. The department was plagued by scandal during the Obama administration — including secret wait lists, systemic neglect and veterans dying while waiting to see a doctor.

VA SECRETARY WILKIE: THE VA IS MAKING REAL PROGRESSION ON SUICIDE PREVENTION FOR VETERANS

“Putting our veterans first means making sure they are at the center of any reform efforts. That is exactly what the administration did with the VA MISSION Act — put the veteran ahead of the bureaucracy,” Dan Caldwell, executive director of Concerned Veterans for America, told Fox News when asked about Ocasio-Cortez’s comments. “The VA is structured for a veteran population that has fundamentally changed from when it was built. Policy reforms should fundamentally change with the population and the times. When the resources follow the veteran, the veteran wins.”

“When resources go to prop up an aging and outdated bureaucracy, the veteran loses. It’s not about ‘fixing’ the VA, rather it is about making sure the focus of the VA is on the veteran, not itself,” he said.

Current VA Secretary Robert Wilkie is the fourth secretary to lead the VA in the past four years, while the VA’s $200 billion budget has doubled in the past decade.

Wilkie has since declared the VA to be making “groundbreaking progress,” on accountability, transparency and efficiency while touting the MISSION Act.

“Under President Trump, VA has done more in the last two years than it has in decades in reforming the department and improving care and benefits for our nation’s heroes,” he said in a Fox News op-ed in January, before saying there was still work to be done on issues such as suicide prevention.

Ocasio-Cortez’s comments are part of an increasing ideological shift among Democrats questioning the benefits of private health care — with many now pushing single-payer forms of government-run health care for the population at large.

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2020 hopeful Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., this month unveiled his latest Medicare-for-all plan, signed onto by a number of other 2020 hopefuls. That plan would largely abolish private insurance plans — with Sanders suggesting insurers could be reduced to cosmetic surgery.

“Under Medicare for All, we cover all basic health care needs, so they’re not going to be there to do that. I suppose if you want to make yourself look a bit more beautiful, you want to work on that nose, your ears. They can do that,” he said.

Fox News’ Barnini Chakraborty contributed to this report.

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President Trump will travel to the U.K. and France in June to mark the anniversary of the D-Day landings, the White House announced Tuesday.

“President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump accepted the invitation of Her Royal Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to visit the United Kingdom from June 3 to 5, 2019,” a statement said. “This state visit will reaffirm the steadfast and special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom.

DESPITE ANGER IN LONDON, TRUMP FINDS SUPPORT IN ENGLAND’S PRO-BREXIT WORKING-CLASS TOWNS

Trump will also participate in a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May and attend a ceremony in Portsmouth to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, before traveling to France on June 6, to participate in a ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and meet with French President Emmanuel Macron.

Trump has visited both countries before, but Trump’s visit to the U.K. will be part of a state visit — an aspect that was absent when he visited the country last year on a working visit and where he sparked a significant anti-Trump protest in London, as well as a number of smaller pro-Trump rallies.

FRENCH AMBASSADOR BLASTS ‘BIG MOUTH’ TRUMP, SAYS HE READS ‘BASICALLY NOTHING’

Trump has had a somewhat rocky relationship with both May and Macron. While his relationship with May has largely been positive, he has also publicly criticized her handling of Britain’s departure from the European Union.

The relationship with Macron, on the other hand, hit a high last year when the Frenchman visited the White House and was warmly embraced by the president (“He is perfect,” Trump told the press). But it later soured over issues such as Trump’s criticism of French defense spending, tariffs and Trump’s move to begin withdrawing troops from Syria.

After Macron said in November that Europe may have to build its own army to “protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America,” Trump called the remarks “very insulting” and pointed to the French surrender to Germany in World War II — before hitting Macron’s approval ratings.

“He was just trying to get onto another subject,” he said.

Fox News’ Kristin Brown contributed to this report.

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With Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report now out in the open, attention is likely to return in coming weeks to the salacious and unverified anti-Trump dossier compiled by former British spy Christopher Steele — a dossier whose more sensational claims were not substantiated by Mueller’s team.

The dossier, funded by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and Hillary Clinton’s 2016 campaign, sent shockwaves through the country and the halls of power in D.C. when it was published in January 2017, complete with lurid tales of a sex tape featuring prostitutes that the Russian government was said to be holding over President Trump’s head.

JIM JORDAN: AMERICAN PEOPLE WANT ACCOUNTABILITY FOR PEOPLE WHO STARTED RUSSIA INVESTIGATION

But despite an intensive two-year investigation, Mueller’s team found no evidence of any such tape. It also said it didn’t have evidence of another claim in the dossier that former Trump attorney Michael Cohen met with Russian officials in Prague.

The New York Times, in a lengthy article on the Steele dossier’s current standing, noted that there is no evidence in the Mueller report on a number of claims: “DNC moles, Romanian hackers, Russian pensioners — or years of Trump-Putin intelligence trafficking.” But a lawyer for Fusion GPS, the firm that commissioned the dossier, told The Times that the Mueller probe backed up “the core reporting” in the Steele memos — including that Russian President Vladimir Putin directed “a covert operation” to have Trump elected.

Now, with a redacted version of Mueller’s report public and pressure building for the release of an unredacted version, attention is set to turn toward the investigation by DOJ Inspector General Michael Horowitz, who confirmed at a panel discussion in March that his office is continuing to review potential surveillance abuses by the FBI. That review began last March, and Fox News was told last month that it’s nearing completion.

At the heart of the controversy over the Steele dossier is not just how reliable its contents were, but also what role it played in the FBI’s application for a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA) warrant against former Trump campaign aide Carter Page. Horowitz has said he will address the question of whether the FBI followed all “legal requirements” when applying for that warrant.

Politico reported Wednesday that Horowitz’s team has been “intensely focused on gauging Steele’s credibility as a source” for the FBI. One official told the outlet that he had the impression that the IG report “is going to try and deeply undermine” Steele.

Republicans in Congress have long focused on the dossier, claiming that it formed the origins of what became Mueller’s Russia investigation. They and the president have noted in particular the dossier’s funding by the DNC and Clinton campaign.

TRUMP ALLIES AWAIT RESULTS OF TWO INTERNAL PROBES THAT COULD EXPOSE RUSSIA INVESTIGATION BACKSTORY

“You can’t have the FBI using one party’s opposition research document to launch an investigation and spy on the other party’s campaign,” Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said on “Cavuto Live” on Saturday.

On Thursday, California Republican Devin Nunes told Fox News’ Sean Hannity that the report shows that the dossier also formed part of the memo that established the scope of the special counsel’s investigation.

“On Carter Page and [former Trump campaign chairman] Paul Manafort, that information came from political opponents, the Clinton campaign fed right into the FBI, directed to the special counsel to go investigate what was in the infamous Steele dossier,” Nunes said. “That is the only thing of relevance that was in today’s 450-page report.”

According to Politico, Steele intends to rebut the IG’s characterizations in the form of a rare public statement, but he has declined to be interviewed — citing the potential impropriety of his involvement in an internal Justice Department investigation as a foreign national.

The Times, meanwhile, reports that Steele made it clear to associates in 2017 that he considered the dossier to be raw intelligence — a starting point for further investigation.

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The IG probe isn’t the only investigation where the Steele dossier may face scrutiny. Attorney General William Barr told lawmakers that he intends to review FBI and DOJ conduct during the formative days of the Russia investigation — where the Steele dossier played a role.

Trump, meanwhile, has pledged to “get to the bottom” of the origins of the Russian probe, and has promised to “turn the tables” and investigate the investigators — which could include closer scrutiny of the role that Steele’s infamous dossier played.

Fox News’ Gregg Re and Catherine Herridge contributed to this report.

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2020 presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., on Saturday doubled down on her call for the House to open impeachment proceedings against President Trump in the wake of the release of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report — even as others in her party appear wary of such a push.

“I know people say this is politically charged and we shouldn’t go there, and that there is an election coming up, but there are some things that are bigger than politics,” she told an audience at Keene College, New Hampshire.

WARREN URGES HOUSE TO BEGIN IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS ON HEELS OF MUELLER REPORT

“We cannot be an America that says it is OK for a president of the United States to try and block an investigation into a foreign attack on our country or an investigation into that president’s own misbehavior — so I have called on the House to initiate impeachment proceedings.”

While investigators effectively cleared the president and his associates on the Russia collusion charge central to the probe, it outlined a series of Trump actions that were investigated as part of the obstruction-of-justice inquiry.

WHY DID MUELLER WAIT TO ANSWER COLLUSION QUESTION, BUSH AG MICHAEL MUKASEY ASKS

Mueller did not reach a determination on that issue, but he provided a series of examples of how Trump tried to limit the probe — including telling his then-White House Counsel Don McGahn to tell the acting attorney general to remove Mueller.

Democratic leaders have so far focused on demanding access to the full, unredacted report and have also called for Mueller to testify to Congress.

Warren first made her call for impeachment on Friday, when she noted that Mueller said in his report that “Congress has authority to prohibit a President’s corrupt use of his authority in order to protect the integrity of the administration of justice.”

“The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty,” she tweeted. “That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the President of the United States.

MUELLER REPORT IGNITES NEW DEM BATTLE OVER IMPEACHMENT

In justifying her call, she said on Saturday that there are “three big toplines [from the Mueller report] that are inescapable.”

“A hostile foreign government attacked our 2016 election in order to help Donald Trump; Donald Trump welcomed that help; and when the federal government tried to investigate what happened, Donald Trump took multiple steps to try and derail or obstruct the investigations,” she said.

“The fundamental question for us is ‘is there going to be some accountability here?’” she added.

Her call is likely to be welcomed by the left-wing of the party, whose wing in Congress has been open in its hope to impeach the president. Freshman Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., who said in January that she wanted to “impeach the motherf—-r,” has introduced a resolution urging the House Judiciary Committee to probe whether Trump committed impeachment-level offenses. That resolution has been signed onto by fellow left-wing freshman Reps. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y.

But it is far from clear how much traction such a push will gain. Impeachment proceedings would almost certainly be dead-on-arrival in the Republican-controlled Senate and risk-taking 2020 Democrats away from their policy agendas to focus on impeachment.

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Other 2020 Democrats have so far not come out in explicit support of Warren’s call, while House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has long been skeptical of impeachment proceedings against Trump.

“I’m not for impeachment,” Pelosi told The Washington Post in an interview last month. “Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country. And he’s just not worth it.”

Fox News’ Elina Shirazi, Judson Berger and Paulina Dedaj contributed to this report.

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President Trump on Saturday took yet more shots at “highly conflicted” Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report, as well as the “fake news” medias coverage of its findings — while declaring that “The Russia Hoax is dead!”

“Despite the fact that the Mueller Report should not have been authorized in the first place & was written as nastily as possible by 13 (18) Angry Democrats who were true Trump Haters, including highly conflicted Bob Mueller himself, the end result is No Collusion, No Obstruction!” he tweeted.

TRUMP RAILS AGAINST ASSOCIATES WHO SPOKE TO MUELLER, CALLS CLAIM ‘TOTAL BULL—T’

He went on to accuse the “fake news media” of “doing everything possible to stir up and anger the pols and as many people as possible seldom mentioning the fact that the Mueller Report had as its principle conclusion the fact that there was NO COLLUSION WITH RUSSIA.”

“The Russia Hoax is dead!” he added.

Trump, who repeatedly railed against the Mueller probe during its two-year investigation into Russia interference in the 2016 election, declared he was “having a good day” when the report finally landed on Thursday. He also tweeted that it was “game over” for this political opponents, as his legal team issued a statement calling the report a “total victory for the president.”

They pointed to the report’s findings, namely that Mueller’s office found no evidence of collusion and did not conclude that a crime was committed on the question of obstruction of justice. However, it also contained a number of embarrassing details for the White House that were considered as part of the obstruction inquiry — particularly Trump’s efforts to curb or influence the probe.

“The president’s efforts to influence the investigation were mostly unsuccessful, but that is largely because the persons who surrounded the president declined to carry out orders or accede to his requests,” investigators wrote.

Those findings quickly rose to the surface of media coverage and caught the attention of politicians on both sides of the aisle.

Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah., said in a statement Friday that he was “sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the president.”

He also cited report findings that campaign aides welcomed help from Russia, “including information that had been illegally obtained; that none of them acted to inform American law enforcement; and that the campaign chairman was actively promoting Russian interests in Ukraine.”

WARREN URGES HOUSE TO BEGIN IMPEACHMENT PROCEEDINGS ON HEELS OF MUELLER REPORT

While its bottom line finding of no evidence of collusion has been enough for the White House to declare victory, the other findings have led Democrats to call for further investigations, including impeachment hearings. House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., subpoenaed the full, unredacted report as well as underlying materials on Friday, while Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., was one of a number of Democrats calling for impeachment hearings.

“The severity of this misconduct demands that elected officials in both parties set aside political considerations and do their constitutional duty,” she said. “That means the House should initiate impeachment proceedings against the President of the United States.”

On Friday, Trump took a more critical stance toward the report than he had on Thursday, and took aim at aides who had spoken to Mueller, He was apparently responding to a detail in the report that outlines how Trump allegedly told then-White House Counsel Don McGahn to inform the acting attorney general that Mueller should be removed in June 2017 — a demand that McGahn ignored. Trump also reportedly questioned McGahn’s habit of taking notes and making memos for the record.

“Statements are made about me by certain people in the Crazy Mueller Report, in itself written by 18 Angry Democrat Trump Haters, which are fabricated & totally untrue. Watch out for people that take so-called ‘notes,’ when the notes never existed until needed,” he tweeted, before calling some statements in the report “total bull—t.”

He later said it was “finally time to turn the tables and bring justice to some very sick and dangerous people who have committed very serious crimes, perhaps even Spying or Treason.”

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However, even amid signs that the controversy over the Mueller report is by no means over, there are some signs that the report has had some positive effects for the president. The Trump 2020 campaign announced Friday that it had raised more than $1 million since the report was released.

“The two-year lie was put to bed once and for all. It was a great day for the campaign and Americans responded enthusiastically,’ Trump campaign COO, Michael Glassner, said in a statement.

Even on Saturday, Trump tried to strike a positive tone on the report, saying that the “end result of the greatest Witch Hunt in U.S. political history is No Collusion with Russia (and No Obstruction).”

“Pretty Amazing!” he said.

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President Trump’s 2020 campaign announced Friday that it had raised more than $1 million since Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia report was made public a day earlier.

“The biggest takeaway for the campaign was that President Trump — once again — was completely exonerated of the ludicrous Russia collusion allegations and was again found not to have obstructed the special counsel’s investigation,” Trump’s campaign COO, Michael Glassner, said in a statement. “The two-year lie was put to bed once and for all. It was a great day for the campaign and Americans responded enthusiastically.”

TRUMP CAMPAIGN GOES ON POST-MUELLER ATTACK AGAINST ‘OBAMA-ERA DOJ AND FBI,’ WARNS ‘JUSTICE WILL BE SERVED’

“The release of the full Mueller report directly led to the campaign raising more than $1 million,” he said. “Relative to our recent daily average, the Mueller news drove a 250 percent increase in fundraising from grassroots donors.”

The White House and the 2020 Trump campaign declared victory on Thursday after the report landed, pointing to its conclusion that investigators found no evidence of collusion and did not conclude that a crime was committed on the question of obstruction of justice.

However, it did contain a number of embarrassing details for the White House that were considered as part of the obstruction inquiry. It was apparently those details that led Trump to brand it the “Crazy Mueller Report” on Friday.

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Trump’s campaign used the lack of evidence of collusion to go on the attack against those in the FBI and DOJ they believe instigated the two-year probe in the first place, saying it was “time to turn the tables” in a campaign video. That language was repeated by Trump on Friday, who called the report a big, fat, waste of time, energy and money” in a tweet.

“It is now finally time to turn the tables and bring justice to some very sick and dangerous people who have committed very serious crimes, perhaps even Spying or Treason,” he said. “This should never happen again!”

Fox News’ Kristin Brown contributed to this report.

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Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office investigated former Attorney General Jeff Sessions for possible perjury, but it found evidence was “insufficient” to prove that he was “willfully untruthful” in his answers.

Mueller’s report, a redacted version of which was released Thursday, said that it looked into Sessions’ interactions during the campaign with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. Kislyak and Sessions met during the Republican National Convention in July 2016 and in his Senate office in September.

TRUMP RAILS AGAINST ASSOCIATES WHO SPOKE TO MUELLER, CALLS CLAIMS ‘TOTAL BULL—T’

“The office considered whether, in light of these interactions, Sessions committed perjury before, or made false statements to, Congress in connection with his confirmation,” the report said.

Sessions said in his Senate confirmation hearing in January 2017 that he “did not have communications with the Russians” in response to a question about Trump campaign communications with the Russian government.

He also followed up with written responses, answering “no” to a question that asked whether he had “been in contact with anyone connected to any part of the Russian government about the 2016 election, either before or after election day.”

In a March 2017 follow-up, after his interactions with Kislyak were reported by the media, Sessions said he did “not recall any discussions with the Russian Ambassador, or any other representatives of the Russian government, regarding the political campaign on these occasions or any other occasion.”

The report says the investigation established that Sessions interacted with Kislyak and that the Russian mentioned the presidential campaign “on at least one occasion” but that “the evidence is not sufficient to prove that Sessions gave knowingly false answers to Russia-related questions in light of the wording and context of those questions.”

Mueller’s team says that the evidence “makes it plausible” that Sessions didn’t recall discussing the campaign with Kislyak, and his answer in his confirmation hearing was in response to a question about a an alleged continued exchange of information between the campaign and the Russian government.

“Sessions later explained to the Senate and to the Office that he understood the question as narrowly calling for disclosure of interactions with Russians that involved the exchange of campaign information, as distinguished from more routine contacts with Russian nationals,” the report says. “Given the context in which the question was asked, that understanding is plausible.”

NEWT GINGRICH: CAUGHT UP IN THE MUELLER MEDIA MADNESS

As a result, Mueller’s office concluded that “the evidence was insufficient to prove that Sessions was willfully untruthful in his answers and thus insufficient to obtain or sustain a conviction for perjury or false statements.”

Sessions’ personal lawyer said in March last year that Sessions was not not the subject of a federal criminal investigation for alleged perjury.

ABC News reported that former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe had overseen an investigation into whether Sessions “lacked candor” when he testified before Congress about contacts with Russian operatives during the 2016 presidential campaign.

“The Special Counsel‘s Office has informed me that after interviewing the Attorney General and conducting additional investigation, the Attorney General is not under investigation for false statements or perjury in his confirmation hearing testimony and related written submissions to Congress,” attorney Chuck Cooper said in a statement.

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Sessions announced in 2017 that he would recuse himself from overseeing any FBI probe into alleged ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials — placing Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in charge of overseeing the probe.

Sessions resigned in November 2018 and was subsequently replaced by current Attorney General William Barr.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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