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Vice President Mike Pence said that Sunday was "a great day for America" after it was revealed Special Counsel Robert Mueller determined the Trump campaign did not collude with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

"After two years of investigation, and reckless accusations by many Democrats and members of the media, the Special Counsel has confirmed what President Trump said along; there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election," Pence said in a statement.

READ THE MUELLER FINDINGS

He said that Attorney General William Barr — who released a four-page summary on Sunday of Mueller’s investigation, that was submitted to the Justice Department on Friday — "confirmed that there was no obstruction of justice."

"This total vindication of the President of the United States and our campaign should be welcomed by every American who cherishes the truth and the integrity of our elections."

Pence said that Americans "can be confident" that the Trump administration will "continue to focus" on what’s most important to the U.S., and added: "We can only hope that Democrats, who have spent so much time on these discredited allegations, will join us to advance an agenda that will make our nation even more prosperous and more secure for every American."

Barr’s summary said that Mueller’s investigation "did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated" with Russians involved in hacking efforts attempting to sway the 2016 election "despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign."

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The investigation, according to the attorney general’s letter, also found that Mueller’s office had insufficient evidence to conclude whether Trump obstructed justice related to the probe, but handed over the responsibility of making that determination over to the attorney general’s office.

The report found that on the issue of obstruction, "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

Fox News’ Matt Leach contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

California Sen. Kamala Harris sent a subtle signal to the old-guard of Democratic politics that every era has its end.

At an Atlanta church service dedicated to youth Sunday, the presidential candidate compared leadership to a relay race in which each generation must ask themselves "what do we do during that period of time when we carry that baton."

Then she added with a smile that for "the older leaders, it also becomes a question of let’s also know when to pass the baton."

The 54-year-old senator — one of the younger contenders for the White House in 2020 — did not mention any other presidential hopeful or tie her remarks to the Democratic presidential scramble. Her spokeswoman said she only wanted to encourage the youth at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Her commentary to the congregation once led by Martin Luther King Jr. comes as former Vice President Joe Biden, 76, considers whether to join a field that already includes Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is 77. Both men have run for president before and fallen short.

‘Biden and Sanders are seen as strong contenders for the Democratic nomination, though other candidates and some voters have emphasized the need for a more youthful approach to try and beat President Donald Trump in the general election. Several other candidates in the race, including two governors, are also in their late sixties.

Harris noted Sunday that King was 26 when he led the Montgomery Bus Boycotts that pushed him to the forefront of the civil rights movement.

Later Sunday, Harris told a rally at Morehouse College in Atlanta that Attorney General William Barr should testify under oath on Capitol Hill, rather than just submit the written summary of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the Russia investigation.

The Justice Department said Sunday that Mueller’s team did not find evidence that Trump’s campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election. Mueller also investigated whether Trump obstructed justice but did not come to a definitive answer.

Other highlights of Sunday campaigning:

KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand assailed President Donald Trump as a coward who is "tearing apart the moral fabric of the vulnerable," as she officially started her campaign for president.

The senator spoke in New York Sunday, feet away from one of Trump’s signature properties, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

She said that instead of building walls as Trump wants to do along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans build bridges, community and hope.

Gillibrand also called for full release of Mueller’s report in the Russia investigation. Attorney General William Barr released a summary Sunday afternoon, but Democrats want to see the full details.

Gillibrand is trying to position herself in the crowded field of Democrats seeking the party’s nomination. While some hopefuls have shied away from mentioning Trump, Gillibrand has not hesitated to do so.

ELIZABETH WARREN

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Sunday the National Rifle Association is holding "Congress hostage" when it comes to stemming gun violence.

The Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate tells a campaign rally that if seven children were dying from a mysterious virus, "we’d pull out all the stops till we figured out what was wrong." But in terms of gun violence, she said the NRA "keeps calling the shots in Washington."

Warren finished a two-day campaign trip to New Hampshire with an event at a middle school in Conway Sunday afternoon.

Warren focused much of her speech on her approach to economics, but paid special attention to unions Sunday. She said more power needs to be put back in the hands of workers.

BETO O’ROURKE

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke told voters in Las Vegas Sunday that President Donald Trump bears blame for the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border but responsibility lies with everyone in the country to fix the situation.

O’Rourke spoke Sunday to more than 200 people packed into and snaking around a taco shop on the city’s north end. He said immigrant families are leaving their home countries and journeying on foot because they have no other choice.

The former Texas congressman said desperate families were broken up in the U.S. when they were at their most vulnerable and desperate moments, and what happened to them "is on every single one of us."

___

Woodall reported from Conway, New Hampshire. Associated Press writers Juana Summers in New York and Michelle Price in Las Vegas contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

George Conway — the husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway — renewed his attacks on President Trump on Sunday, implying the president may have committed a crime in connection with the Russia investigation.

Responding to press secretary Sarah Sanders’ tweet that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s office didn’t find that the Trump campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russians to influence the 2016 election, Conway tweeted back at Sanders, referencing a quote attributed to Mueller.

READ THE MUELLER REPORT FINDINGS

"You misspelled ‘While this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him,’" he tweeted. "Pls fix. Thx."

Conway often questions Trump on Twitter, writing that the president has been unfit for office — much to the apparent dismay of his wife, Kellyanne.

“My husband has been very critical of the president publicly, which is unlike him because he’s usually a very private person,” the White House adviser told Maria Bartiromo during an interview on Fox Business Network’s “Mornings with Maria."

TRUMP GOES NUCLEAR ON KELLYANNE SPOUSE GEORGE CONWAY: ‘HUSBAND FROM HELL!’

Last week, George Conway and Trump traded barbs on Twitter. The president called him a "loser."

"George Conway, often referred to as Mr. Kellyanne Conway by those who know him, is VERY jealous of his wife’s success & angry that I, with her help, didn’t give him the job he so desperately wanted," Trump said. "I barely know him but just take a look, a stone cold LOSER & husband from hell!"

In response, George tweeted: "You. Are. Nuts."

Kellyanne Conway told Fox News that Trump "is protective of me, that’s what people really should take from this. I’m not being asked to choose between my marriage and my job, Donald Trump has never made me feel that way. I know George is quoted recently as saying ‘I wish she didn’t work there.’"

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This was not the first time a Trump administration official has been put in an awkward spot due to the president’s disagreements with a spouse. In 2017, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao found herself in a similar situation when Trump criticized her husband, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., for lack of action on health care.

Fox News’  Liam Quinn contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Alan M. Dershowitz, the attorney and Harvard Law professor emeritus, slammed Robert Mueller on Sunday, saying the special counsel engaged in a “cop-out” by stating that his report neither exonerated President Trump nor concluded he’d committed a crime related to obstruction of justice.

Dershowitz said Mueller seemed to try having it both ways. “It sounds like a law-school exam,” he said, adding that the report sounded wishy-washy. “Shame on Mueller.”

The special counsel "did not draw a conclusion" as to whether obstruction of justice took place, according to a letter with the key findings released Sunday by Attorney General William Barr.

READ THE MUELLER REPORT FINDINGS

Dershowitz also said it was a great day for Trump and a "very bad day for CNN" given how many of the left-leaning cable network’s personalities and guests predicted the probe would lead to a slew of indictments for collusion and obstruction. “They should be hanging their heads in shame.”

Barr’s four-page letter, addressed to top Democrats and Republicans on the House and Senate Judiciary Committees, offered key insight into the nearly two-year-long investigation, the results of which were submitted to the Justice Department on Friday.

Dershowitz said the job of the prosecutor is to make a binary decision, yes or no: yes means indictment and no means “shut up.”

He also said Mueller failed to have the "guts" to say yes or no, despite all the time and money spent on the probe.

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Mueller was assigned to the job in May 2017 by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who oversaw much of his work. Mueller’s office "issued more than 2,800 subpoenas" and executed nearly 500 search warrants throughout the duration of the investigation, which lasted close to two years.

The office also "obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses" during the probe.

Source: Fox News Politics

A note referencing the recent terrorist attacks in New Zealand was found at the scene of a possible arson fire at a Southern California mosque, police said Sunday.

Nobody was hurt, and members of the Islamic Center of Escondido were able to extinguish the small blaze before firefighters around 3:15 a.m., officials said.

The incident was being investigated as arson and a possible hate crime, said police in the city about 30 miles (48 kilometers) north of downtown San Diego.

A note was found in the parking lot referencing the shootings this month that killed 50 people at mosques in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand, police Lt. Chris Lick said. He did not elaborate about the contents of the note.

Investigators did not release information about a suspect.

The fire caused minor damage to the building’s exterior.

The Escondido mosque was created four years ago and serves several hundred people in the city of about 143,000 residents, member Yusef Miller said.

He told KNSD-TV that worshippers are "very on edge," but undeterred.

"We won’t stop praying," Miller said. "We won’t stop gathering."

Source: Fox News National

Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika’s own party is rejecting his plans for a national conference aimed at quelling mass protests against his leadership.

The spokesman for the FLN party said Sunday on private TV channel Dzair News that the conference idea is "no longer valid" because it would involve unelected figures and the protesters reject it.

Spokesman Hocine Khaldoun said the solution to Algeria’s political crisis is "the election of a president capable of talking to the people."

The comments mark a new blow to 82-year-old Bouteflika, who has barely been seen in public since a 2013 stroke and has faced a month of protests.

Bouteflika canceled an April 18 election but proposed the national conference made up of various representatives of society to prepare new elections.

Source: Fox News World

A Venezuelan official says Russian aircraft arrived in Caracas this weekend as part of ongoing military cooperation between the two allies.

The official said Sunday that Russian military officials are visiting to discuss equipment maintenance and training, and strategy. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the matter.

Flightradar24, a flight-tracking site, showed the flight path Saturday of what it listed as a Russian air force plane, apparently headed to Caracas while flying across the Caribbean.

Javier Mayorca, a Venezuelan journalist, tweeted that a Russian cargo plane with military equipment also arrived in Caracas on Saturday.

The reports could not be independently confirmed.

Russia backs Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro, who has rejected demands from the United States and dozens of other countries that he resign.

Source: Fox News World

The Latest on the 2020 campaign season (all times Eastern):

6:40 a.m.

Howard Schultz will attend the annual conference of the American Israel Public Affairs Committee on Monday evening. That from Schultz aide Erin McPike.

Schultz’s decision to attend the annual AIPAC conference in Washington comes as Democrats have been grappling with the left’s criticism of Israel and as most presidential candidates are sitting this year’s conference out. Schultz is actively considering an independent presidential bid himself.

On Friday, Schultz responded to a tweet from the liberal advocacy group MoveOn, which has been urging Democratic presidential candidates not to attend. He said that the "unwillingness of the far left to even speak with people they may disagree with is one of the worst symbols of the dysfunction in Washington today."

___

2:30 p.m.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren says the National Rifle Association is holding "Congress hostage" when it comes to stemming gun violence.

The Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate tells a campaign rally that if seven children were dying from a mysterious virus, "we’d pull out all the stops till we figured out what was wrong." But in terms of gun violence, she says the NRA "keeps calling the shots in Washington."

Warren finished a two-day campaign trip to New Hampshire with an event at middle school in Conway Sunday afternoon.

Warren focused much of her speech on her approach to economics, but paid special attention to unions Sunday. She says more power needs to be put back in the hands of workers.

___

1:50 p.m.

California Sen. Kamala Harris may be dropping a hint on what she thinks about former Vice President Joe Biden, who is considering a third bid for the White House.

At an Atlanta church service Sunday, Harris compared leadership to a relay race in which each generation must ask themselves "what do we do during that period of time when we carry that baton."

Then she added with a smile that for "the older leaders, it also becomes a question of let’s also know when to pass the baton."

Harris is 54 years old. Biden is 76, and some of his supporters have said he’s aware that his age could be a political liability in the Democratic primary. He wouldn’t be the oldest contender, though. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is 77.

___

1:40 p.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand is assailing President Donald Trump as a coward who is "tearing apart the moral fabric of the vulnerable."

The senator is speaking in New York, feet away from one of Trump’s signature properties, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

She says that instead of building walls as Trump wants to do along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans build bridges, community and hope.

Gillibrand also called for full release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report in the Russia investigation. Attorney General William Barr was expected to release a summary of principal conclusions, but Democrats want to see the full details.

Gillibrand is trying to position herself in the crowded field of Democrats seeking the party’s nomination. While some hopefuls have shied away from mentioning Trump, Gillibrand has not hesitated to do so.

___

1:25 p.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke is telling voters in Las Vegas that President Donald Trump bears blame for the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border but responsibility lies with everyone in the country to fix the situation.

O’Rourke spoke Sunday to more than 200 people packed into and snaking around a taco shop on the city’s north end. He says immigrant families are leaving their home countries and journeying on foot because they have no other choice.

The former Texas congressman says desperate families were broken up in the U.S. when they were at their most vulnerable and desperate moments, and what happened to them "is on every single one of us."

___

9 a.m.

As New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand officially kicks off her Democratic presidential campaign in New York City, her rivals are courting voters in early primary states.

Several Democratic White House hopefuls are campaigning Sunday, the day the Justice Department is expected to release key findings from special counsel Robert Mueller’s confidential report on the Russia investigation.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders continues his California swing with a trip to San Francisco.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper are wrapping up campaign trips to New Hampshire.

California Sen. Kamala Harris is attending a church service before speaking at a rally in Atlanta at Morehouse College.

Source: Fox News National

Former FBI Director James Comey seemingly responded Sunday on Twitter to the release of key findings from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation — saying he had questions.

"So many questions," Comey tweeted, alongside a photo of himself in a forest, looking upwards while surrounded by tall trees.

Mueller was appointed special counsel of the Russia probe shortly after President Trump had fired Comey in May 2017.

Hours before Comey’s tweet, Attorney General William Barr released a four-page letter detailing what he called the "principal conclusions" of Mueller’s investigation into possible collusion between President Trump’s 2016 campaign and Russia.

The special counsel’s office, according to Barr, "did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated" with Russians who worked on those hacking efforts "despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign."

READ THE MUELLER REPORT FINDINGS

Following a "thorough factual investigation" into whether Trump possibly obstructed justice, the special counsel’s office "did not draw a conclusion" because it was unclear what constituted obstruction of justice.

Mueller "recognized" that the lack of evidence that Trump was involved in collusion would undercut any obstruction case — which would depend on showing a corrupt intent by the president. The investigation stated that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

Trump later called the investigation "an illegal takedown that failed."

Comey, in an opinion piece written for The New York Times published Thursday, said that Mueller’s report put at stake the "apolitical administration of justice."

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“I have no idea whether the special counsel will conclude that Mr. Trump knowingly conspired with the Russians in connection with the 2016 election or that he obstructed justice with the required corrupt intent," Comey wrote. "I also don’t care."

“I care only that the work be done, well and completely.”

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into possible collusion between Russia and the Trump campaign concluded with the final report submitted to the Justice Department this past Friday. In a letter released Sunday, Attorney General William Barr publicly revealed the "principal conclusions" and more about the under-wraps investigation.

Just months after President Trump was inaugurated into office, Mueller was appointed to the special counsel’s office on May, 17 2017. In total, it lasted close to two years — 675 days, or one year, 10 months and six days, to be exact.

READ THE MUELLER REPORT FINDINGS

The intent of the investigation was to determine whether Trump and his campaign illegally worked with Russia to sway the 2016 presidential election. The special counsel’s office determined that it "did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia."

The president on Sunday responded to Mueller’s report in two different ways. Speaking to reporters, Trump called the investigation "an illegal takedown that failed."

He also tweeted: "No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!" It was Trump’s 78th tweet regarding the probe, excluding retweets.

In total, 19 attorneys worked with the special counsel’s office at some point during the nearly two-year-long probe, which, between May 2017 and September 2018, spent $25.2 million. Of that, $12.3 million was direct spending, while $12.9 million was spent on "indirect" component expenses for the Justice Department.

The special counsel’s office has said that the indirect expenses don’t amount to additional taxpayer expenditures since those resources — especially personnel, such as employees of the FBI or other agencies — would have been devoted to other cases had there been no special-counsel investigation.

During the investigation, at least 42 people were interviewed by Mueller or his team or testified before a grand jury, and 34 people — in addition to 3 companies — either have been indicted or have pleaded guilty in connection to the probe.

Of the 34, 6 were former advisers or associates of Trump, while 2 were not considered Trump advisers or associates. Additionally, 26 Russians have been charged.

Mueller’s office worked with a team of "approximately 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, and other professional staff" during the investigation.

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Ultimately, the special counsel’s office "issued more than 2,800 subpoenas, executed nearly 500 search warrants, obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses," according to Barr’s letter.

On Friday evening, Mueller submitted his report to Barr, marking the end of the politically explosive probe and the beginning of a new battle over its contents and implications.

Source: Fox News Politics


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