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Unearthed video footage showed 2020 hopeful Bernie Sanders recalling his excitement surrounding the Cuban revolution in the 1950s.

“I remember, for some reason or another, being very excited when [former Cuban dictator] Fidel Castro made the revolution in Cuba,” he said, while speaking at the University of Vermont in 1986.

“I was a kid … and it just seemed right and appropriate that poor people were rising up against rather ugly rich people.”

During that speech, Sanders said he almost had to “puke” when he saw former President John F. Kennedy push his opponent at the time, former President Richard Nixon, to be tougher on Cuba. “For the first time in my adult life, what I was seeing is the Democrats and Republicans … clearly that there really wasn’t a whole lot of difference between the two,” he said.

CHER QUESTIONS BERNIE SANDERS FOR SAYING BOSTON BOMBER DESERVES RIGHT TO VOTE

The video, which surfaced in February, was just the latest in a series that showed Sanders, I-Vt., a self-described “democratic socialist,” praising socialist societies.

Sanders’ other comments have included praising bread lines and Soviet public transportation; defending Castro as someone in Cuba who “he educated their kids, gave their kids health care, totally transformed the society”; and mocking criticism of the Marxist Sandinista regime in Nicaragua.

“It’s funny, sometimes American journalists talk about how bad a country is because people are lining up for food. That’s a good thing,” he said in an old video clip.

“In other countries, people don’t line up for food, rich people get the food and poor people starve to death.”

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Sanders has taken the lead among most 2020 hopefuls — often trailing only former Vice President Joe Biden in polls — and became somewhat of an icon for the progressive insurgency within the Democrats.

In 2016, he was able to push a number of big-government policies while placing second in the battle for the presidential nomination. Those policies included free college tuition and a single-payer health care system, ideas that many critics have associated with socialist governments.

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President Trump’s re-election campaign fired back Wednesday at Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders for arguing that convicted Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev and other violent criminals should be allowed to vote from prison, calling the idea “deeply offensive.”

“The extremity and radicalism of the 2020 Democrats knows no bounds,” Trump campaign press secretary Kayleigh McEnany told Fox News. “Giving imprisoned terrorists, sex offenders, and murderers the right to vote is an outrageous proposal that is deeply offensive to innocent victims across this country, some of whom lost their lives and are forever disenfranchised by the very killers that 2020 Democrats seek to empower.”

BERNIE SANDERS SAYS BOSTON MARATHON BOMBER, SEXUAL ASSAULTERS SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO VOTE

The statement offered a preview of sorts of the battle to come between Trump’s campaign and the still-evolving Democratic field. Sanders remains a front-runner in that crowded primary race, though former Vice President Joe Biden is expected to jump in the race on Thursday — and polling consistently shows him at or near the top of the field.

Sanders’ statement about voting rights for inmates drew in the Trump campaign after generating controversy all week.

During a CNN town hall on Monday night, a Harvard student asked Sanders if his position on expanding voting rights to felons in prison would support “enfranchising people” like Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev as well as those “convicted of sexual assault,” whose votes could have a “direct impact on women’s rights.”

Sanders first responded by saying he wanted a “vibrant democracy” with “higher voter turnout” and blasted “cowardly Republican governors” who he said were “trying to suppress the vote.”

The Vermont senator then argued that the Constitution says “everybody can vote” and that “some people in jail can vote.”

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“But, I think the right to vote is inherent to our democracy,” Sanders said. “Yes, even for terrible people.”

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

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Former CNN host and DailyMail.com editor-at-large Piers Morgan called Democratic presidential candidate frontrunner Bernie Sanders’ comments Monday that he wanted felons to vote, including the Boston Marathon bomber, “utter lunacy” Tuesday.

“I couldn’t really believe what I was hearing. This is a guy, frontrunner as you said, to be the potential nominee for the Democratic Party to beat Donald Trump, that’s their plan and what they want to do. And their main selling point right now on a CNN Town Hall is they want the Boston Marathon bomber to be able to vote while he is in prison? While he is on death row?” Morgan said on Fox News’ “Tucker Carlson Tonight.”

MEGHAN MCCAIN AND WHOOPI GOLDBERG CLASH OVER VOTING RIGHTS FOR BOSTON BOMBER: ‘HE IS A TERRORIST’

Sanders, an independent U.S. senator from Vermont, defended his stance on voting rights during a CNN Town Hall event Monday night. He argued that the U.S. Constitution says “everybody can vote” and that “some people in jail can vote.”

Morgan found it ironic that Sanders, who is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, wants criminals to vote for president but calls President Trump a criminal.

“And there is an irony, Tucker, the same Democrats screaming every single second of every day about Trump and collusion — ‘He is a criminal, we can’t have a criminal running the country’ — and yet at the same time, they are campaigning for every criminal in the country to have the right to vote for president,” Morgan said.

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The former CNN host criticized the idea of felons voting, saying it would not resonate with middle America and would get Trump reelected.

“This is madness! This is a way to get Trump reelected. Maybe they are all sleeper cells,” Morgan joked.

Fox News’ Joseph A. Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

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Jesse Watters, co-host of “The Five,” suggested Tuesday that Democrats wanted to grant felons voting rights so they could “change the rules” in American elections.

“The reason they’re doing this … is because they can’t persuade enough actual voters about their ideas so they have to create new voters,” he said on “The Five.” “They got rocked in 2016 so instead of trying to change their message, they’re just trying to change the rules.”

Watters likened that proposal to Democratic pushes to abolish the electoral college and add justices to the Supreme Court.

Co-host Juan Williams responded by noting that Democrats won the popular vote in 2016. “Democrats got more votes than Republicans in 2016.” “All of them were felons,” co-host Greg Gutfeld joked in response.

MEGHAN MCCAIN AND WHOOPI GOLDBERG CLASH OVER VOTING RIGHTS FOR BOSTON BOMBER: ‘HE IS A TERRORIST’

Watters’ comments came after Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., the frontrunner among declared Democratic candidates as of Tuesday, indicated he would be willing to let Boston marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev vote as part of his plan to extend that right to felons in prison.

Regardless of what Democrats intended, Watters predicted that policy would ruin their electoral prospects. “They just handled Donald Trump the wedgiest of wedge issues,” he said before asking Williams if Democrats actually wanted to lose in 2020. “This is made to order for Donald Trump,” Watters added.

Sanders’ proposal, Watters suggested, would result in corruption and fraud. “[Democrats] have totally undercut their messaging on election integrity,” he said.

BERNIE SANDERS BACKERS UPSET WITH PETE BUTTIGIEG OVER TRUMP COMPARISON

Sanders, who faced a wave of criticism for his proposal, defended felons’ voting rights as part of American democracy. “I think the right to vote is inherent to our democracy,” he said Monday.

“Yes, even for terrible people, because once you start chipping away and you say, ‘That guy committed a terrible crime, not gonna let him vote. Well, that person did that. Not gonna let that person vote,’ you’re running down a slippery slope,” he added.

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According to polling from April, Sanders and former Vice President Joe Biden gathered the most support of Democratic voters in New Hampshire. Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., have both called for a restoration of felons’ voting rights after their release from prison. Buttigieg, however, disagreed with Sanders’ proposal to let felons vote while they remained in prison.

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On Tuesday, Fox News political contributor Karl Rove threw cold water on Sens. Bernie Sanders’, I-Vt., and Elizabeth Warren’s, D-Mass., 2020 candidacies.

His comments came after the University of New Hampshire released a poll showing Sanders beating former Vice President Joe Biden by double digits — 30 percent to 18 percent of likely Democratic voters in the granite state. Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg came in third with 15 percent while Warren lagged each of them with just five percent of likely voters’ support.

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Although Sanders has frequently led declared Democratic candidates, Biden, who is expected to declare his candidacy in the coming days, has beaten him in previous polling. “Gotta be a little careful with these polls,” Rove told “America’s Newsroom” host Bill Hemmer.

Rove pointed to St. Anselm College’s earlier polling which showed Biden leading Sanders by 7 percent (23 to 16 percent) among registered Democratic voters in New Hampshire, and Warren garnering 9 percent of their support.

“These numbers are all over the board. Do we really think that Joe Biden has lost 20 percent of his support in 10 days? Do we really think that Bernie Sanders has doubled his support in 10 days? … Elizabeth Warren, do we think she’s lost nearly half her support in 10 days?” Rove asked, sounding incredulous.

Rove, who speculated Sanders could beat President Donald Trump in 2020, said he expected Sanders to have an advantage over Biden given that his home state of Vermont is adjacent to New Hampshire. The interesting story, Rove said, was that Warren, who has been painted as a progressive hero, wasn’t doing so well.

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“Elizabeth Warren, just off of a re-election campaign in Massachusetts, not doing too well in either poll,” Rove observed. The polling results came just after Warren became the first Democratic candidate to call for impeachment hearings surrounding Trump’s conduct in office — something more established Democrats have shied away from apparently due to its political implications.

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Sanders has backed away from impeachment but, like Warren, has faced criticism for proposing large government programs that would cost American taxpayers a lot of money. His populist disposition has led some to compare him to the president. As Rove pointed out, a fraction of Sanders’ supporters backed Trump in the general election.

Rove argued that Buttigieg, whom he saw as a strong contender in recent polling, made a smart move in tying Sanders and Trump together as populist influences that needed to be tamed by a candidate like him.

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Multiple town halls were hosted in Manchester, N.H. on Monday evening with five 2020 Democratic presidential candidates, and Sen. Bernie Sanders found himself answering tough questions about his socialist ideals from a Harvard University student whose family fled Soviet Russia.

Samantha Frankel-Popell told Sanders about how socialism impacted her family’s life and grilled him on how his version of Democratic socialism will aim to be different from the socialist regimes of other countries.

“My father’s family left Soviet Russia in 1979 fleeing from some of the very same socialist policies that you seem eager to implement in this country,” the young woman said during the CNN event. “How do you rectify your notion of Democratic socialism with the failures of socialism in nearly every country that has tried it?”

Sanders smiled as Frankel-Poppel asked her question, which was met with mixed applause from the crowd.

“Thank you for asking that question,” Sanders said, before responding with a question himself. “Is it your assumption that I supported or believe in authoritarian communism that existed in the Soviet Union? I don’t. I never have, and I opposed it. I believe in a vigorous democracy.”

BERNIE SANDERS BACKERS UPSET WITH PETE BUTTIGIEG OVER TRUMP COMPARISON

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Sanders went on to expand on his frequent tirade against the nation’s billionaires, discussing the polarization of wealth in the country and rallying for government-funded social initiatives like universal healthcare and tuition-free public education.

“It’s a radical idea,” he said. “Maybe not everyone believes but it’s what I believe. We should have a government that represents working families and not just the 1 percent and powerful corporations.”

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He concluded by summarizing to the student the differences between what his version of socialism is, and that which the student’s family experienced in Russia decades ago.

“What Democratic socialism means to me is we expand Medicare, we provide educational opportunity to all Americans, we rebuild our crumbling infrastructure. In other words, the government serves the needs of all people rather than just wealthy campaign contributors. That’s what it means to me,” he said.

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2020 presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders on Monday defended his stance for granting voting rights to criminals in prison, including the Boston Marathon bomber and convicted sexual assaulters.

During a CNN town hall on Monday night, Harvard student Anne Carlstein asked if his position would support “enfranchising people” like Boston Marathon bomber Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who she noted is a “convicted terrorist and murderer,” as well as those “convicted of sexual assault,” whose votes could have a “direct impact on women’s rights.”

Sanders first responded by saying he wanted a “vibrant democracy” with “higher voter turnout” and blasted “cowardly Republican governors” who he said were “trying to suppress the vote.”

The Vermont senator then argued that the Constitution says “everybody can vote” and that “some people in jail can vote.”

5 THINGS TO KNOW ABOUT SEN. BERNIE SANDERS

“If somebody commits a serious crime- sexual assault, murder, they’re gonna be punished. They may be in jail for 10 years, 20 years, 50 years, their whole lives. That’s what happens when you commit a serious crime,” Sanders elaborated.

“But, I think the right to vote is inherent to our democracy. Yes, even for terrible people, because once you start chipping away and you say, ‘That guy committed a terrible crime, not gonna let him vote. Well, that person did that. Not gonna let that person vote,’ you’re running down a slippery slope. So, I believe that people who commit crimes, they pay the price. When they get out of jail, I believe they certainly should have the right the vote, but I do believe that even if they are in jail, they’re paying their price to society, but that should not take away their inherent American right to participate in our democracy.”

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CNN anchor Chris Cuomo pressed the Democrats’ frontrunner, asking him if he was “sure about that” since he effectively was “writing an opposition ad.” Sanders dismissed such concerns, saying he’d written “many 30-second opposition ads” throughout his life.

“This is what I believe. Do you believe in democracy? Do you believe that every single American 18 years of age or older who is an American citizen has the right to vote?” Sanders continued. “This is a democracy. We’ve got to expand that democracy and I believe that every single person does have the right to vote.”

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A new poll in the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House shows Sen. Bernie Sanders of neighboring Vermont leading in the battle for the Democratic presidential nomination.

The University of New Hampshire Granite State Poll also shows former Vice President Joe Biden a distant second, with South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg surging to third. And the survey, released Monday, puts Republican President Trump far ahead of his declared or potential primary rivals in New Hampshire’s GOP presidential primary, which will be held next February.

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According to the poll, 30 percent of likely Democratic primary voters in the Granite State say they’d back Sanders, the independent from Vermont who’s making his second straight run for the White House. Sanders crushed eventual nominee Hillary Clinton in the state’s 2016 Democratic primary. Biden, who’s expected to launch his White House bid this week, is at 18 percent, with Buttigieg at 15 percent.

Sanders held a 26-22 percent edge over Biden in UNH’s previous poll, which was conducted in February. Buttigieg stood at just 1 percent in that survey.

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“While Biden continues to garner the second most support among likely Democratic Primary voters, his share of support has fallen considerably since early 2018, while support for Sanders has remained largely steady as he has lead the field over the past year,” explained UNH pollster Andrew Smith.

The UNH survey differs from a Saint Anselm College Survey Center poll released two weeks ago. That survey indicated Biden on top, at 23 percent, with Sanders at 16 percent and Buttigieg in third at 11 percent.

THE LATEST FOX NEWS 2020 POLL

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of neighboring Massachusetts stood at 5 percent in the new UNH survey.

“Warren, while still among the top five Democratic candidates, continues to experience far less support than she enjoyed in 2017 and 2018,” Smith pointed out.

Sen. Kamala Harris of California registered at 4 percent, with Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas at 3 percent, and Sen. Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota, Rep. Tim Ryan of Ohio, and New York entrepreneur Andrew Yang at 2 percent.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Reps. Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii and Eric Swalwell of California, and Miramar, Florida Mayor Wayne Messam registered at 1 percent, with everyone else in the large field of Democratic presidential contenders at less than 1 percent.

Biden and Sanders have topped nearly every single national and early primary and caucus state poll in recent months. Name recognition is a likely contributing factor, as early polling in an election cycle is often heavily influenced by name ID.

Fifty-one percent of likely Democratic primary voters said they would like to see Biden run, with 36 percent saying they hoped the former vice president wouldn’t launch a presidential bid.

Thirty percent said Sanders is the Democratic candidate with the best chance to defeat the president in the 2020 general election, with 25 percent indicating Biden had the best shot of topping Trump.

In the GOP primary race, the poll indicates Trump enjoys 76 percent support among likely Republican primary voters, with former Ohio Gov. John Kasich at 10 percent. Kasich, a vocal critic of the president who came in second to Trump in the 2016 New Hampshire primary, is mulling a 2020 bid.

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Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, who last week launched his primary challenge run against the president and immediately came to New Hampshire to campaign, stands at 5 percent support. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, who’s mulling a primary challenge, stands at 1 percent. Hogan comes to New Hampshire on Tuesday to headline ‘Politics and Eggs,’ a must stop for White House hopefuls.

The Granite State Poll was conducted April 10-18 by the University of New Hampshire, with 549 randomly selected Granite State adults interviewed by live telephone operators. The survey’s sampling error for the 241 likely Democratic primary voters was plus or minus 6.3 percentage points.

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It doesn’t seem like Bernie’s bros with Mayor Pete. Or at least his supporters aren’t.

Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Ind., made headlines when he compared President Trump’s supporters to those who back Bernie Sanders, stating both groups feel marginalized and want to tear down the system.

“I think the sense of anger and disaffection that comes from seeing that the numbers are fine, like unemployment’s low, like all that, like you said GDP is growing and yet a lot of neighborhoods and families are living like this recovery never even happened,” the 37-year-old told high school students in Nashua, N.H.

“It just kind of turns you against the system in general and then you’re more likely to want to vote to blow up the system, which could lead you to somebody like Bernie and it could lead you to somebody like Trump. I think that’s how we got where we are.”

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But the statement seemingly hasn’t gone over well with those who support Sanders — including some prominent Democrats.

“Come on ⁦@PeteButtigieg⁩. It is intellectually dishonest to compare Bernie to Trump,” Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., tweeted, before listing some policy differences between Sanders and the president.

Nina Turner, a vocal supporter of Sanders, tweeted: “Bernie Sanders’ supporters are not the same as Trump fans — Sen. @BernieSanders supporters are Democratic & Independent voters, many of whom are people of color.”

Citizen Uprising, a far-left Twitter account, sent out a post reading: “Pete Buttigieg is officially over. He just blamed Trump AND Bernie voters for the problems we currently face.”

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However, Rep. Khanna’s and others protests were quickly shot down, with one prominent analyst referring to the California Democrat as a “Sanders surrogate.”

“This is an extremely weird Narrative coming from some Sanders surrogates. Buttigieg’s comments were extremely boilerplate, basically that Trump and Sanders voters both suffer economic anxiety and are disaffected with the system,” FiveThirtyEight’s Nate Silver tweeted.

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“It’s an extremely weird thing to get upset about unless they’re deliberately looking to pick a fight with Buttigieg.”

New York-based writer M. Mendoz Ferrer also took issue with complaints from those on the Sanders side.

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“So, it’s interesting that the Sanders camp, including Ro Khanna, are upset with @PeteButtigieg for basically stating that Trump and Sanders voters both suffer economic anxiety and are disaffected with the system – because that is pretty much all Bernie Sanders ever says,” she tweeted.

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They’re the better, but lesser-known, halves of the 2020 presidential candidates.

But thanks to their time on the campaign trail, as well as cameos in magazine profiles and social media livestreams, the spouses of the nearly two-dozen people running for president are coming into the spotlight.

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Here’s a look at the marital running mates who could be the next first lady, or the first-ever first gentleman, of the United States.

THE DEMOCRATS

2020 Democratic Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg (R) and husband Chasten Glezman are seen arriving at 'The Late Show With Stephen Colbert' at the Ed Sullivan Theater on February 14, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/GC Images)

2020 Democratic Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg (R) and husband Chasten Glezman are seen arriving at ‘The Late Show With Stephen Colbert’ at the Ed Sullivan Theater on February 14, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gilbert Carrasquillo/GC Images)

Chasten Buttigieg

Twenty-nine-year-old Chasten Buttigieg is among the most well-known of the 2020 spouses. The teacher who married Pete Buttigieg last year has become a staple on the campaign trail as he travels alongside his husband, South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg.

Buttigieg – who’s been surging the past month in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination – would become the nation’s first gay president if he makes it to the White House. And Chasten Buttigieg would also make history as the country’s first ‘first gentleman.’

Chasten Buttigieg, who’s on leave from his job as a teacher as he helps his husband’s presidential campaign, has quickly become a star of his own on social media. He’s now up to 276,000 followers on Twitter.

And he’s becoming a regular in campaign emails.

In a fundraising pitch to supporters a few days ago, he described watching his husband declare his candidacy for president, saying “I watched from backstage, in awe of the man I love and the community of people who are standing for a better future for all of us.”

Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, the 2018 Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Texas, right, stands with his wife, Amy O'Rourke, at his election night party, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in El Paso, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, the 2018 Democratic candidate for U.S. Senate in Texas, right, stands with his wife, Amy O’Rourke, at his election night party, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in El Paso, Texas. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Amy O’Rourke

Beto O’Rourke’s wife Amy was thrust in the spotlight the day after the former congressman from Texas launched his presidential campaign last month.

After repeatedly joking on the campaign trail that his wife has been raising their three children “sometimes with my help,” O’Rourke faced criticism that the quip spotlighted gender stereotypes.

Beto O’Rourke vowed to be more thoughtful going forward, adding that “my ham-handed attempt to try to highlight the fact that Amy has the lion’s share of the burden in our family — that she actually works but is the primary parent in our family, especially when I served in Congress, especially when I was on the campaign trail — should have also been a moment for me to acknowledge that that is far too often the case, not just in politics, but just in life in general.”

But even before those headlines, Amy O’Rourke was featured in her husband’s popular Instagram and YouTube videos from his 2018 Senate campaign. And she was a co-star in a widely discussed Vanity Fair article that came out hours before Beto O’Rourke launched his White House bid.

O’Rourke, like her husband, is an El Paso native. She hails from a locally politically influential family. O’Rourke met her husband on a blind date and a year later, in 2005, they married. The couple has three children.

ORourke, 37, worked as a teacher and later served as the superintendent of a K-8 school. She’s currently part of CREED, an educational nonprofit in El Paso.

FILE: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) and his wife, Jane O'Meara Sanders, wave as they are introduced during an Elko Town Meeting on February 19, 2016 in Elko, Nevada. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

FILE: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders (D-VT) and his wife, Jane O’Meara Sanders, wave as they are introduced during an Elko Town Meeting on February 19, 2016 in Elko, Nevada. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Jane O’Meara Sanders

Like her husband, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Jane O’Meara Sanders is a native of Brooklyn.

But she met her second husband in the 1980s, when she was working as a community organizer in Burlington, Vermont and Bernie Sanders was running for mayor of the city.

Sanders, who’s frequently seen at her husband’s side on the presidential campaign trail, has long served as one of his top unofficial advisers, dating back to his first election to the House of Representatives nearly three decades ago.

Sanders was in the headlines in recent years for another reason – her tenure from 2004-2011 as president of Burlington College. The school folded in 2016 due to financial difficulties and she came under investigation. But last year, the U.S. attorney’s office in Vermont informed Sanders that they had finished their investigation, and would not bring charges against her.

Two years ago she co-founded the Sanders Institute, a think tank. But with her husband now running for president again, operations at the institute have been suspended for the duration of Sen. Sanders’s White House campaign.

Bruce Mann arrives to vote in Cambridge, Mass., on Nov. 8, 2016. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Bruce Mann arrives to vote in Cambridge, Mass., on Nov. 8, 2016. (Photo by David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

Bruce Mann

Massachusetts native Bruce Mann is a professor at Harvard Law School and a legal historian.

But the 68-year-old Mann is best known to many outside the world of legal academics as the husband of Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Mann was a common sight on the campaign trail during the opening weeks of his wife’s presidential campaign, escorting Bailey, the golden retriever he gave Warren as a gift last summer.

He also grabbed attention for his cameo appearance in Warren’s much talked about (and derided) Instagram livestream, when he passed on drinking a beer with his wife in their kitchen.

Mann and Warren married in 1980. The senator has two adult children from a previous marriage.

Then-California Attorney General Kamala Harris and lawyer Douglas Emhoff (R) attend Children's Defense Fund - California Hosts 24th Annual Beat The Odds Awards at Book Bindery on December 4, 2014 in Culver City, California. (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Children's Defense Fund)

Then-California Attorney General Kamala Harris and lawyer Douglas Emhoff (R) attend Children’s Defense Fund – California Hosts 24th Annual Beat The Odds Awards at Book Bindery on December 4, 2014 in Culver City, California. (Photo by Jesse Grant/Getty Images for Children’s Defense Fund)

Doug Emhoff

Sen. Kamala Harris met her husband on a blind date.

Doug Emhoff, the other part of this California power couple, is a partner at the prestigious multinational law firm DLA Piper. He earned $1.5 million last year, according to the couple’s 2018 tax returns. The earnings helped put the couple at the top of the income list among candidates who released their tax returns.

Emhoff has two children from a previous marriage.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and her husband Jonathan Gillibrand walk together after a media availability announcing she will run for president in 2020 outside the Country View Diner, January 16, 2019 in Troy, New York. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand and her husband Jonathan Gillibrand walk together after a media availability announcing she will run for president in 2020 outside the Country View Diner, January 16, 2019 in Troy, New York. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

Jonathan Gillibrand

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York also met her husband, Jonathan, on a blind date.

The venture capitalist who’s a British national planned to stay in the U.S. for only a year while studying for his masters in business administration at Columbia University. But he stayed because of his relationship with Gillibrand.

The two married in 2001 and have two sons.

Amy Klobuchar and John Bessler attend the 2018 Directors Guild of America Honors at DGA Theater on October 18, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/WireImage)

Amy Klobuchar and John Bessler attend the 2018 Directors Guild of America Honors at DGA Theater on October 18, 2018 in New York City. (Photo by Mark Sagliocco/WireImage)

John Bessler

Like his wife, Sen. Amy Klobuchar, John Bessler was raised in Minnesota. Bessler’s an attorney and academic. He’s a professor of law at the University of Baltimore School of Law and an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law Center.

The couple, who met in a pool hall and married in 1993, have a daughter named Abigail.

Bessler has written seven books – most of them about capital punishment.

But his wife says he’s also taken on many of the traditional roles of the spouse of a U.S. senator.

FILE: Erica Lira Castro (C), wife of Julian Castro, attends his confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill June 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

FILE: Erica Lira Castro (C), wife of Julian Castro, attends his confirmation hearing before the Senate Banking, Housing and Urban Affairs Committee in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill June 17, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Erica Lira Castro

Like her husband, former San Antonio mayor and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro, Erica Lira Castro’s a Texas native.

Lira Castro, the first person in her family to graduate college, became an elementary school teacher and currently works as an education consultant. She teamed up in 2015 with then-Second Lady Jill Biden to encourage more Hispanic Americans to become teachers.

She married Julian Castro in 2007 and they have a daughter and a son.

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (left) and his wife Trudi Inslee as he announces his run for the 2020 Presidency at A & R Solar on March 1, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (left) and his wife Trudi Inslee as he announces his run for the 2020 Presidency at A & R Solar on March 1, 2019 in Seattle, Washington. (Photo by Karen Ducey/Getty Images)

Trudi Inslee

Like her husband Gov. Jay Inslee, Trudi Inslee is a native of Washington State.

The two met at Seattle’s Ingraham High School and were married a few years later, in 1972. They have three sons.

Trudi Inslee’s an avid golfer, a passion that was passed along by her father, who was a public golf course pro and former University of Washington golf coach.

Outgoing governor John Hickenlooper stands with his wife, Robin Pringle before the inauguration of Governor-elect Jared Polis at the Colorado State Capitol on Tuesday, January 8, 2019. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Outgoing governor John Hickenlooper stands with his wife, Robin Pringle before the inauguration of Governor-elect Jared Polis at the Colorado State Capitol on Tuesday, January 8, 2019. (Photo by AAron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

Robin Pringle

Former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper’s wife, Robin Pringle, is a vice president for corporate development at Liberty Media, a corporation which owns QVC, Charter Communications, SiriusXM, The Atlanta Braves, Provide Commerce, and Barnes and Nobles.

Pringle, who’s a quarter century younger that Hickenlooper, tied the knot with the then-Colorado governor in 2016.

The two started dating in 2014, two years after Hickenlooper split from his first wife, best-selling author Helen Thorpe.

Abraham Williams (L) and Tulsi Gabbard attend the Sean Penn CORE Gala benefiting the organization formerly known as J/P HRO & its life-saving work across Haiti & the world at The Wiltern on January 5, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for CORE, formerly J/P HRO )

Abraham Williams (L) and Tulsi Gabbard attend the Sean Penn CORE Gala benefiting the organization formerly known as J/P HRO & its life-saving work across Haiti & the world at The Wiltern on January 5, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for CORE, formerly J/P HRO )

Abraham Williams

Rep. Tulsi Gabbard’s husband, Abraham Williams, is commonly seen on the campaign trail, with his camera capturing almost every move of his wife his wife’s bid for the White House.

Williams, a cinematographer, and Gabbard were already friends in 2012 when he volunteered to help shoot Gabbard’s campaign ads when she was running for the U.S. Congress for the first time.

The two, who share a passion for surfing, started dating a year later. They married in 2015. It was the second marriage for Gabbard, who’s seven years Williams’ senior.

Andrea Zetts

Like her husband Rep. Tim Ryan, Andrea Zetts is a native of northeastern Ohio.

Zetts, an elementary school teacher, met Ryan in 2008. The two, who were both previously married, tied the knot in 2013.

They have two children from her first marriage and added a baby boy in 2014.

U.S. Representative from California's 15th congressional district Eric Swalwell and wife Brittany Watts attend the Broadway opening night of 'Oklahoma' at Circle in the Square Theatre on April 07, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)

U.S. Representative from California’s 15th congressional district Eric Swalwell and wife Brittany Watts attend the Broadway opening night of ‘Oklahoma’ at Circle in the Square Theatre on April 07, 2019 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images)

Brittany Watts

Rep. Eric Swalwell met his wife Brittany Watts in 2015 and they married a year later. It was the congressman’s second marriage.

They have a son and a daughter together.

Watts is a sales director at the Ritz-Carlton in Half Moon Bay.

FILE: John Delaney and April Delaney attend the 7th Annual Common Sense Media Awards honoring Bill Clinton at Gotham Hall on April 28, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images for Common Sense Media)

FILE: John Delaney and April Delaney attend the 7th Annual Common Sense Media Awards honoring Bill Clinton at Gotham Hall on April 28, 2011 in New York City. (Photo by Jason Kempin/Getty Images for Common Sense Media)

April McClain-Delaney

Former Rep. John Delaney of Maryland’s wife, April McClain-Delaney, is a communications lawyer and an entrepreneur, who’s focused for some 25 years on the regulation of communications satellites as well as safeguarding the digital privacy of children.

While John Delaney grew up in a union household in New Jersey, April McClain was born and raised in Idaho, where her father was a russet potato farmer.

The two met at Georgetown University Law Center and married in 1990. They have four children together.

Evelyn Yang

Entrepreneur Andrew Yang met his future wife Evelyn on the campus of Columbia University.

The two married in 2011 and have two sons.

They live in New York City.

THE REPUBLICANS

President Donald Trump, right, with first lady Melania Trump, center, and daughter Tiffany Trump, left, arrive for Easter services at Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, Sunday, April 21, 2019, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Donald Trump, right, with first lady Melania Trump, center, and daughter Tiffany Trump, left, arrive for Easter services at Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea, Sunday, April 21, 2019, in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

First Lady Melania Trump

The most famous among the spouses of 2020 candidates, Melania Trump has carved out her own agenda in the White House, launching an anti-bullying initiative and traveling solo last year to Africa.

The Slovenia-born fashion model became a permanent resident of the United States in 2001. She married Donald Trump in 2005 and became a naturalized American citizen a year later.

She is the second foreign-born first lady in the country’s history, following Louisa Adams, who was the wife of President John Quincy Adams.

Melania and Donald Trump have one son together, Barron.

FILE: William Weld and Leslie Marshall attend GREY GARDENS Opening Night Party at The Boathouse in Central Park on November 2, 2006 in New York City. (Photo by Patrick McMullan/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

FILE: William Weld and Leslie Marshall attend GREY GARDENS Opening Night Party at The Boathouse in Central Park on November 2, 2006 in New York City. (Photo by Patrick McMullan/Patrick McMullan via Getty Images)

Leslie Marshall

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld, who to date is the only Republican primary-challenging President Trump, married Leslie Marshall in 2003. It was the second marriage for both.

Leslie Marshall has two children from her first marriage with Dominic Bradlee, the son of Washington Post editor Ben Bradlee.  She was a reporter for the Washington Post and is a magazine editor and novelist.

Source: Fox News Politics


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