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In some of his most revealing comments on why he decided against running for president, moderate former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg cited his age — but also took aim at the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

"To start a four-year job, or maybe an eight-year job, at age 79 may not be the smartest thing to do. But if I think if I thought I could win, I would have,” the 77-year-old billionaire media mogul explained.

SCHULTZ SAYS NO ROOM FOR CENTRISTS IN EITHER MAJOR PARTY

“I just couldn’t see a path to where I could get the nomination,” Bloomberg said Thursday while speaking at the Bermuda Executive Forum in New York City. “It’s just not going to happen on a national level for somebody like me starting where I am unless I was willing to change all my views and go on what CNN called ‘an apology tour.’”

While he’s poured millions of his own money into combating climate change and battling gun violence, the Democrat turned Republican turned independent who last year re-registered as a Democrat suggested that he was simply more moderate than the ever-growing field of 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, many of whom are increasingly moving to the left.

Pointing to 76-year-old former Vice President Joe Biden, who’s likely to jump into the White House race next month, Bloomberg said, "Joe Biden went out and apologized for being male, over 50, white.”

“He apologized for the one piece of legislation which is actually a pretty good anti-crime bill, which if the liberals ever read it, most of the things they like would be in that bill. They should have loved that. But they didn’t even bother to read it. You’re anti-crime, you must be anti-populist,” Bloomberg added as he took a shot at progressives.

IT’S BIDEN, SANDERS, HARRIS, AND O’ROURKE IN 2020 POLL

And he also jabbed at former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, who last week declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination and quickly raised an eye-popping $6.1 million in his first 24 hours as a candidate.

"And so everybody else, Beto, whatever his name is, he’s apologized for being born,” said Bloomberg, which brought laughter from the audience. “I mean, I don’t mean to be unkind. And a lot of people love him and say he’s a smart guy, and some day if he wins I’d certainly support him."

Bloomberg seriously considered launching a presidential bid, and earlier this year he made campaign-style swings through the early voting primary and caucus states. But he announced on March 5 that he would not run for the White House.

Source: Fox News Politics

Add Beto O’Rourke to a growing list of Democratic presidential candidates who are considering scrapping long-standing Senate procedure in hopes of passing a sweeping progressive agenda should they make it to the White House.

Under siege is the filibuster, the longstanding Senate tradition requiring 60 votes in the 100-member chamber to advance a bill, effectively allowing the minority party to block legislation.

WHAT IS A FILIBUSTER?

“I think that that’s something that we should seriously consider,” O’Rourke told reporters on the campaign trail in New Hampshire earlier this week.

“We have to look at some of these institutional reforms, whether it’s the Supreme Court, the Electoral College, the filibuster in the Senate, we’ve got to get democracy and our institutions working again,” explained the former three-term congressman from Texas.

On the same day that O’Rourke entertained the idea, a rival for the Democratic nomination also opened the door to the idea of dispatching with the filibuster.

“When you talk about changing the filibuster rule I understand that we are heading, right now, we are heading that way,” Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey said in an interview on "Pod Save America." “I’m going to tell you that for me that door is not closed.”

The comments mark an increasing appetite in the 2020 Democratic field for challenging longstanding political traditions and institutions — everything from the voting age to the Electoral College to the Senate filibuster. And for Booker, his comments mark a backtrack from previous statements.

Last month, Booker told NPR that he didn’t favor eliminating the filibuster. And in an interview with Politico in January – before he formally declared his candidacy – he said “we should not be doing anything to mess with the strength of the filibuster. It’s one of the distinguishing factors of this body. And I think it is good to have the power of the filibuster.”

The pro-Republican opposition research shop America Rising accused the senator of flip-flopping on the issue, saying in an email after the senator’s latest comments that “Booker has jumped on board with the latest liberal litmus test, abolishing the filibuster.”

TRUMP CALLS FOR SCRAPPING FILIBUSTER TO BUILD WALL

At the moment, the filibuster is actually helping the Democratic Party, enabling its members to slow or stall legislation that the GOP Senate majority and Trump White House might support. Trump himself has called for an end to the filibuster, only to be met with opposition from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

But McConnell lowered the threshold to confirm Supreme Court nominees to a simple majority, and other federal judges and Cabinet nominees also are no longer subject to a 60-vote threshold. The filibuster on legislation is all that remains in terms of built-in brakes in the upper chamber that could slow the majority party.

And so Democrats hoping to pass a sweeping progressive agenda if they win back the White House are concerned their proposals could get bottlenecked in the Senate, where the Democrats have a shot at winning back control — but have little chance of grabbing a 60-member, filibuster-proof majority.

“Everything stays on the table. You keep it all on the table. Don’t take anything off the table,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren said when recently asked on the presidential campaign trail about scrapping the filibuster.

Candidates proposing major changes to deal with climate change also see the filibuster as a major impediment.

"I don’t believe you can be serious about saying you can defeat climate change unless you realize we need to have the filibuster go the way of history because Mitch McConnell has weaponized the filibuster," Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee told reporters on Wednesday. "You can’t be serious about having major decarbonization legislation in any near-term without removing the filibuster."

But not all of the White House contenders are on board.

“Great question…Let’s change the subject!” joked Sen. Kamala Harris of California, when asked by a voter in Iowa about her stance on the issue.

The Harris campaign tells Fox News that their candidate has “said she’s genuinely conflicted on this issue but everything is on the table.”

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York told "Pod Save America" in January that “I think it’s useful to bring people together, and I don’t mind that you have to get 60 votes for cloture.”

“If you’re not able to get 60 votes on something, it just means you haven’t worked hard enough, talking to enough people and trying to listen to their concerns and then coming up with a solution that they can support. And so I’m not afraid of it one way or the other,” she added.

Sen. Bernie Sanders also opposes scrapping the filibuster.

"I’m not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster. I think the problem is, people often talk about the lack of comity and the anger. The real issue is that you have in Washington a system which is dominated in Washington by wealthy campaign contributors,” he said last month in an interview with CBS News.

Source: Fox News Politics

PLYMOUTH, N.H. – Beto O’Rourke is taking aim at embattled Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, claiming the steadfast ally of Republican President Trump “has openly sided with racists.”

The Democratic presidential candidate and former congressman from Texas – on the campaign trail in New Hampshire – also criticized negotiators ostensibly trying to end the generations-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

BETO O’ROURKE PREDICTS HE COULD WIN TEXAS IN GENERAL ELECTION

“Right now we don’t have the best negotiating partners on either side. We have a prime minister in Israel who has openly sided with racists,” he charged.

O’Rourke has been a critic of Israel’s longtime conservative leader, who is facing a corruption scandal at home, but the comments were some of his most pointed in describing Netanyahu. O’Rourke also jabbed at Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas.

“On the Palestinian side, we have an ineffectual leader. Mahmoud Abbas has not been very effective in bringing his side to the table,” he lamented.

O’Rourke – who narrowly lost his 2018 bid to unseat GOP Sen. Ted Cruz – spoke to the issue Tuesday night at Keene State College. The stop was his first kicking off a jam-packed 48-hour swing through all 10 counties of New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

WHERE BETO O’ROURKE STANDS IN THE LATEST 2020 DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY POLLS

The candidate was asked during a question and answer session with the crowd about accepting large sums of contributions from pro-Israeli lobbyists during his 2018 Senate election in Texas.

“If you’re asking if the contributions I accept connect to the policies I support, the answer is no,” he responded.

O’Rourke once again called for a “two-state solution” between Israel and the Palestinians to achieve peace in the Middle East. “I believe in peace and dignity and full human rights for the Palestinian people and the Israeli people. The only way to achieve that … is a two-state solution,” he emphasized.

During Wednesday’s New Hampshire stops, meanwhile, O’Rourke targeted sales of assault weapons, skirted his stance on late-term abortions, called for pre-K starting for four-year-olds, and acknowledged that he has a learning curve as he runs for president.

Asked during an event at Plymouth State University about his stance on assault weapons, O’Rourke repeated this belief that such firearms should be for military use only.

He pledged that if “you own something like an AR-15 and I’m your president, keep it. Continue to use it responsibly. I don’t want to take anyone’s guns from anyone in the country.”

But he said the AR-15, “which is a variant of something that was designed for battlefield use I see no reason for it to be sold into our communities.”

BETO O’ROURKE STANCE ON LATE TERM ABORTIONS

Speaking with reporters, O’Rourke was asked by Fox News how he would have voted on a controversial GOP-sponsored Senate bill that would have required doctors to provide medical care to newborns, including those born during failed abortions. Most Senate Democrats slammed the bill – which failed to reach a 60-vote threshold to advance – as politically charged.

“I would have listened to the women that I wanted to represent in the state of Texas. I would have listened to doctors and medical providers. I would have looked at the facts and understood the truth. And then I would have voted with those women to make their own decisions about their own bodies,” O’Rourke answered. But he did not say how he would have voted on the bill, which became a political lightning rod.

The answer was similar to how O’Rourke’s fielded questions about abortion since launching his presidential campaign last week. The candidate gave a hint of his support for abortion rights by adding that “I’ve seen the effects of regressive women’s health care policies in Texas, the inability to get much needed medical care… I want to make sure at a national level we don’t make those mistakes.”

As a three-term congressman representing El Paso in the House, O’Rourke supported a bill in 2017 that would have lifted most state restrictions on abortion, including waiting periods.

Abortion has become a pressing issue in the race for the Democratic presidential nomination, with fears by the party that the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court roll back abortion rights that have existed for generations, while conservatives have accused prominent Democrats of indifference to infanticide.

March 20, 2019: Beto O'Rourke speaks at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. 

March 20, 2019: Beto O’Rourke speaks at Plymouth State University in New Hampshire. 

O’Rourke also repeated his push for universal pre-kindergarten, starting at the age of four.

He said he’d partially pay for the program by asking “the very wealthiest to pay a greater share of their wealth.”

And he explained that “it’s going to cause us to spend more up front but we’re going to see much greater return economically in taxes paid down the road from people who are earning far more than they would have otherwise.”

O’Rourke raised a record-breaking $80 million during last year’s Senate campaign, and he set a new record in his White House run, hauling in $6.1 million in his first 24 hours as a candidate, the most by any 2020 Democratic presidential candidate. On Wednesday, he announced that the contributions came from 128,000 individuals, with the average donation standing at $48.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who raised $5.9 million in the day after he announced his candidacy last month, had contributions from 223,000 people, with the average donation standing at $27.

While O’Rourke’s campaign cash made headlines, so did a series of missteps right out of the gate.

This past weekend O’Rourke apologized for joking at several events on Thursday and Friday that his wife Amy had been raising the couple’s three children "sometimes with my help."

Discussing the comments – which critics said spotlighted unwelcome gender stereotypes – O’Rourke promised “not only will I not say that again, but I’ll be more thoughtful going forward in the way that I talk about our marriage.”

On Wednesday, O’Rourke told the crowd that “Amy and I are raising those kiddos.”

Asked if there’s a learning curve on the presidential campaign trail, he quickly answered “Yeah. Oh yeah. I am smart enough to know that there’s so much more for me to learn. The only way for me to learn that is to show up in the communities I seek to serve, and hear things from people’s perspective.”

Fox News’ Gregg Re contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Beto O’Rourke didn’t eat crow, humble pie or even his words after losing to Ted Cruz. He ate dirt instead.

O’Rourke, who came up short in his bid to unseat Sen. Cruz, R-Texas, despite raising $80 million for the Senate push, told the story of his earthy snack in a sprawling 3,000-word profile published by The Washington Post.

“In January, Beto hit the road, much as his father had done before him, and drew energy from the people he met, and — on one stop in New Mexico he didn’t write about in his blog — by eating New Mexican dirt said to have regenerative powers,” the profile reads.

“He brought some home for the family to eat, too.”

WHERE BETO O’ROURKE STANDS IN THE LATEST 2020 POLL

Former Texas congressman Beto O'Rourke gestures during a campaign stop at Keene State College in Keene, N.H., Tuesday, March 19, 2019. O'Rourke announced last week that he'll seek the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke gestures during a campaign stop at Keene State College in Keene, N.H., Tuesday, March 19, 2019. O’Rourke announced last week that he’ll seek the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

The profile was published as O’Rourke joined other Democrats in signaling his support for a range of controversial ideas, including abolishing the Electoral College.

“I think there’s a lot to that. Because you had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor,” O’Rourke said in a video posted online on Tuesday.

“It puts some states out of play altogether, they don’t feel like their votes really count.

“If we really want everyone to vote, to give them every reason to vote, we have to make sure their votes count and go to the candidate of their choosing. So I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that.”

BETO O’ROURKE SAYS HE NEVER TOOK LSD, PROMISES TO STOP USING PROFANITIES

O’Rourke’s comments came one day after Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., pushed a similar proposal.

“Every vote matters and the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” Warren told an audience at the historically black Jackson State University in Mississippi.

YOUNG BETO O’ROURKE WROTE ‘MURDER FANTASY’ ABOUT RUNNING OVER CHILDREN, WAS PART OF FAMED HACKING GROUP: REPORT

O’Rourke, whose entry into the 2020 presidential race last week was accompanied by immense media fanfare, is already rolling in campaign cash.

The 46-year-old reported raising a whopping $6.1 million online in the first 24 hours after his announcement, marking a new record for the 2020 Democratic primary race.

“In just 24 hours, Americans across this country came together to prove that it is possible to run a true grassroots campaign for president — a campaign by all of us for all of us that answers not to the PACs, corporations and special interests but to the people,” O’Rourke, a former Texas congressman who lost last year’s Senate race to Republican Ted Cruz, said in a statement.

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The previous record this year was set by Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., whose campaign posted a $5.9 million haul in the first 24 hours after his 2020 launch.

Source: Fox News Politics

KEENE, N.H. – Beto O’Rourke predicts that if he wins the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, he’ll take his native state of Texas in the general election.

The former congressman from El Paso also said he would “absolutely” support his campaign staff if they wanted to unionize. He also would consider lowering the federal voting age to 16, scrapping the Electoral College, increasing the number of justices on the Supreme Court, and eliminating the filibuster in the Senate.

WHERE BETO O’ROURKE STANDS IN THE LATEST 2020 POLL

Speaking with reporters after holding his first event in New Hampshire as a presidential candidate, O’Rourke said, "Yes I think we can win Texas. I think we’ve proven we know how to campaign. We’ve been to each one of those 254 counties. We’ve listened to the stories our fellow Texans have told us. We’ve incorporated it in the way in which we campaign.”

In his U.S. Senate run last year, O’Rourke raised $80 million in contributions and nearly defeated incumbent Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, in the midterm elections. O’Rourke’s campaign boosted him to Democratic Party rock-star status and launched him toward his White House bid.

Winning Texas and its 38 electoral votes would be a major coup for the Democrats. The last Democrat to take the state in a presidential election was Jimmy Carter in 1976. Republican President Donald Trump won Texas in 2016 but by a smaller margin than GOP nominee Mitt Romney in 2012.

BETO O’ROURKE’S ROLL OUT: BIG BUCKS BUT SOME STUMBLES

O’Rourke arrived in New Hampshire – the state that will hold the first presidential primary, after an eight-and-a-half-hour drive in his Dodge Caravan from State College, Pa., the home of Pennsylvania State University. He spoke and took questions from a couple of hundred people who had waited at least two hours at Keene State College. The stop was O’Rourke’s first in a 48-hour swing in which he said he would visit all 10 of New Hampshire’s counties.

Asked about lowering the voting age to 16, O’Rourke said “I’m open to the idea of a younger voting age. … There’s some merit to it.”

And he said he would “seriously consider” scrapping the Senate’s filibuster — a generations-old tactic for preventing a measure from coming to a vote – as well as the Electoral College and increasing the number of justices on the high court.

“We have to look at some of these institutional reforms, whether it’s the Supreme Court, the Electoral College, the filibuster in the Senate. We’ve got to get democracy and our institutions working again,” he said.

Scrapping the Electoral College — an idea that some of O’Rourke’s Democratic rivals also support — is an unpopular idea in New Hampshire, a small state that sees plenty of traffic in the presidential general election thanks to its status as a battleground state.

O’Rourke arrived in the Granite State one day after independent Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont – one of the front-runners in the 2020 Democratic field – became the first presidential candidate to unionize his campaign staff.

Asked by Fox News if he would do likewise, O’Rourke said: “Absolutely. If those who work on this campaign and who comprise what I hope will be the largest grassroots effort this nation has ever seen, want to unionize, I support that all the way.”

During a question-and-answer session with the crowd, O’Rourke was asked about accepting large sums of contributions from pro-Israeli lobbyists during his 2018 Senate campaign.

“If you’re asking if the contributions I accept connect to the policies I support, the answer is no,” he responded.

O’Rourke once again called for a “two-state solution” between Israel and the Palestinians to achieve peace in the Middle East.

“I believe in peace and dignity and full human rights for the Palestinian people and the Israeli people. The only way to achieve that … is a two-state solution,” he said.

But he also took aim at embattled Israeli leader Benjamin Netanyahu – a close ally of Trump – as well as Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas.

“Right now we don’t have the best negotiating partners on either side. We have a prime minister in Israel who has openly sided with racists,” he charged. “On the Palestinian side, we have an ineffectual leader. Mahmoud Abbas has not been very effective in bringing his side to the table.”

O’Rourke was also asked about his commitment to reducing America’s consumption of fossil fuels.

“I support the Green New Deal. Yes, I understand that as close to 2030 as we possibly can, we have to have this economy and this country fully transitioned off a reliance on fossil fuels,” he said.

But he added that “I also drove here in a Dodge Caravan that burns gasoline. … We also have to acknowledge that we’re still using these fossil fuels right now, so there’s got to be a responsible transition.”

‘Collision course with everyday Americans’

The Republican National Committee took aim at O’Rourke.

"By embracing the Green New Deal, calling for an end to the Electoral College and supporting late-term abortions, Beto O’Rourke is on a collision course with everyday Americans who will reject his extremist views that offer no substance or solution," the RNC’s Mandi Merritt said.

O’Rourke declared his candidacy last Thursday, and immediately drew throngs of media and large crowds during a three-day swing through Iowa, the state that votes first in the presidential caucus.

The day before he arrived in New Hampshire, O’Rourke announced that he hauled in an eye-popping $6.1 million in his first 24 hours as a candidate, the most yet by any 2020 Democratic White House hopeful.

O’Rourke told Fox News that he would release updated campaign cash figures on Wednesday morning.

Carol Beckwith, a resident of nearby Fitzwilliam, N.H., told Fox News that "Beto-mania" is “coming our way.

"We haven’t had much exposure to it really, compared to other people," she said, adding that she remained undecided on whom she’ll vote for in next February’s primary.

"I want the best person for the job," she said.

But Russ Provost of Richmond, N.H., is already sold on O’Rourke, saying he’s already contributed to the Texan’s campaign.

“I watched him on TV a number of times," Provost said. "I liked his style. I want someone young. I want someone under 60 to take over the reins of this country. I don’t want older people running it anymore.

“If he could take Texas and just win the same states Hillary won, he wins."

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders lead the large field of Democratic presidential contenders in a new national poll.

But Sen. Kamala Harris of California and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas are also distancing themselves from the remainder of the pack in the survey, released Tuesday by CNN.

BIDEN, SANDERS, HOLD TOP SPOTS IN 2020 DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY POLLS

Twenty-eight percent of Democrats and Democratic-leaning independent voters said they would most likely support Biden for the party’s 2020 presidential nomination. The former vice president is leaning toward running for the White House for a third time and is expected by some observers to launch his campaign next month.

Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont who’s running for a second straight time for the Democratic nomination, stood at 20 percent in the poll. Biden and Sanders have held the first and second positions in nearly every national and early primary and caucus survey in the 2020 race so far, thanks to strong name recognition, among other factors.

Harris, the former California attorney general, enjoyed the biggest bump in the survey. She jumped eight percentage points from CNN’s December poll to now stand at 12 percent. One point behind her was O’Rourke, at 11 percent. O’Rourke announced his candidacy last Thursday, at the start of the survey’s March 14-17 polling period.

BETO O’ROURKE RAISES BIG BUCKS BUT MAKES STUMBLES OUT OF GATE

Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts stood in fifth place, at 6 percent, with former Secretary of State John Kerry at 4 percent. Sens. Cory Booker of New Jersey and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota stood at 3 percent.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Washington State Gov. Jay Inslee, former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper, former San Antonio, Texas, Mayor Julian Castro – who later served as Housing and Urban Development secretary in the Obama administration – and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Peter Buttigieg were at 1 percent.

One percent is the minimum level candidates must meet in three separate surveys in order to qualify for the Democratic primary debates, which kick off later this year.

Fifty-six percent of Democrats and leaning independents said they want the party to nominate a candidate with a strong chance of defeating Republican President Trump, with 35 percent saying a candidate’s stance on the issue outweighs electability.

Biden leads among those who favor electability at 32 percent, followed by Harris at 16 percent and Sanders at 14 percent.

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But among those who desire ideological purity, Sanders stands at 31 percent, with Biden at 21 percent and O’Rourke at 11 percent.

The CNN poll was conducted by SSRS, with 1003 adults – including 456 Democrats and Democratic leaning independents – questioned by live telephone operators.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke attempted to play a practical joke on his wife by telling her that a turd he plucked from one of their children’s diapers was an avocado, a friend of the couple told The Washington Post.

A gauzy profile of the couple that was published Tuesday and titled "Are Amy and Beto O’Rourke the future of politics?" described the former congressman as an "impulsive and puckish" character who proposed to his future wife on April Fool’s Day.

OPINION: IS BETO O’ROURKE THE SELFIE-POLITICIAN AND METAPHOR FOR OUR TIMES?

Neither Beto nor Amy O’Rourke would confirm the baby poop story, though neither denied it and The Post reported that O’Rourke told the paper it sounded like something he would do. The O’Rourkes have three children: Ulysses, Molly, and Henry. It was not clear which child supplied the raw material for the reported prank.

The Post report also said that O’Rourke deployed a remote-controlled cockroach in the family kitchen and attempted to scare his wife in the shower, a la Anthony Perkins in the 1960 Alfred Hitchcock classic, "Psycho."

O’Rourke, who nearly unseated U.S. Sen Ted Cruz in last year’s midterm elections, became the latest Democrat to enter the presidential race last week. Almost immediately after O’Rourke threw his hat into the ring, he was criticized for saying that his wife has raised their three children "sometimes with my help" at multiple campaign stops in Iowa.

O’Rourke said the criticism of his "ham-handed" attempt to highlight his wife’s work in their marriage was "right on."

"Not only will I not say that again, but I will be much more thoughtful in the ways that I talk about my marriage," he said.

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The controversy did not appear to lessen enthusiasm among his supporters. On Monday, O’Rourke’s campaign announced that it had raised more than $6 million online with a day of his announcement, the most reported by any 2020 candidate.

O’Rourke raised $80 million in grassroots donations in his race against Cruz last year, all while largely avoiding money from PACs.

Click for more from The Washington Post.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Another 2020 Democrat has come out against the Electoral College.

After addressing students at Penn State University on Tuesday afternoon, Beto O’Rourke lamented Hillary Clinton’s failure to take the White House despite winning the popular vote, adding there is “a lot of wisdom” in calls for change.

“I think there’s a lot to that. Because you had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor,” O’Rourke said in a video posted online.

“It puts some states out of play altogether, they don’t feel like their votes really count.

ELIZABETH WARREN SAYS SHE WANTS TO ELIMINATE THE ELECTORAL COLLEGE

“If we really want everyone to vote, to give them every reason to vote, we have to make sure their votes count and go to the candidate of their choosing. So I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that.”

O’Rourke’s support for potentially abolishing the Electoral College came one day after Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D.Mass., pushed a similar proposal.

“Every vote matters and the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting, and that means get rid of the Electoral College,” Warren told an audience at the historically black Jackson State University in Mississippi.

COLORADO DEMS LOOK TO DITCH ELECTORAL COLLEGE SYSTEM

“I believe we need a constitutional amendment that protects the right to vote for every American citizen and makes sure that vote gets counted,” she said. “We need to put some federal muscle behind that, and we need to repeal every one of the voter suppression laws that is out there.”

In February, the Democratic-controlled Colorado State Senate voted to join other blue states in a pact aimed at getting rid of the Electoral College system.

The state Senate approved a bill adding Colorado to the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact. That pact would change the way presidents are picked by allocating each state’s electoral votes to the winner of the national popular vote – regardless of how the state votes.

BETO O’ROURKE SEEMINGLY ENDORSES THIRD-TRIMESTER ABORTIONS: ‘THAT SHOULD BE A DECISION THE WOMAN MAKES’

In theory, the game-changing compact only takes effect once it signs on states representing at least 270 electoral votes, the threshold to win the presidency. With the addition of Connecticut’s seven electoral votes last year, the group now has 172.

Colorado would be the 13th jurisdiction to join the pact if the state’s House also passes it and the state’s Democratic governor signs it into law.

The uphill campaign, if ever brought to fruition, would almost certainly face a court challenge. It has gained renewed attention amid Democrats grumbling about the Electoral College in the wake of President Trump’s 2016 win. While he defeated Hillary Clinton in the electoral vote, he lost the popular vote by 2.9 million ballots.

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The pact is meant to be a work-around to the constitutional requirements that created the Electoral College system, which awards each state’s electors to the winner of that state.

Others that have joined the pact include Connecticut, California, Hawaii, Illinois, Massachusetts, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington and the District of Columbia — all places where Clinton defeated Trump in 2016.

Fox News’ Alex Pappas contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Fox Nation host David Webb said Monday that Democrats are “fear mongering” as a desperate ploy to divide America.

“Here’s what Donald Trump has done, he’s co-opted a lot of their policies. He’s reached out to blacks, he reached out to the unions, he’s reached out to a lot of their base and he’s captured so many of them that it worried the Democrats. So now what do you do?” Webb told “Fox & Friends.” “You have to fear monger, you have to get them an enemy.”

Webb was reacting to various Democrats attempting to link President Trump or other policies to issues of race in the country.

THE FIVE TAKE ON BETO O’ROURKE’S HAND GESTURES

On Friday, 2020 Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke said he was a capitalist but said the “racist capitalist economy” was “imperfect, unfair, unjust.”

"Racists think he’s a racist and his language hurts people," Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., said about President Trump Monday on  MSNBC’s “Hardball with Chris Matthews.”

After listening to the two examples, Webb accused Democrats of pandering.

“If everything’s racist then what is the real issue,” Webb said. “The problem is this is pandering.”

WHO’S RUNNING FOR PRESIDENT IN 2020? GROWING FIELD OF CANDIDATES JOIN RACE FOR DEMOCRATIC NOD

Fox Nation host David Webb said Monday that Democrats are “fear mongering” as a desperate ploy to divide America.

Fox Nation host David Webb said Monday that Democrats are “fear mongering” as a desperate ploy to divide America.

Webb added, “It’s a lie and America is not this.”

The Fox Nation host also believes a large majority of Americans of different backgrounds are fed up with being put into categories.

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“People have had it with being told that you’re black, you’re this, you’re Hispanic, you’re this, you’re a woman, you’re this, you’re young, you’re this,” Webb said.

“They’re putting everyone in categories.  My point is a lot of Americans have said I’m sick of being put in a category.”

Source: Fox News Politics

White House hopeful Beto O’Rourke seemingly endorsed the practice of third-trimester abortions at a campaign event in Ohio on Monday, less than a month after Senate Democrats blocked a bill that would have required doctors to provide medical care to newborns amid a swirling infanticide controversy in Virginia.

The third trimester extends from the 28th week of pregnancy up until birth, and polls consistently show that nearly 80 percent of Americans oppose such late abortions.

"Are you for third-trimester abortions?" an attendee of the campaign event in Cleveland asked O’Rourke, before describing the medical alternatives to such a procedure and disputing the medical necessity of late-term abortions. "Are you going to protect the lives of third-trimester babies? … Are you for or against third-trimester abortions?"

O’Rourke responded: "The question is about abortion and reproductive rights. And, my answer to you is, that should be a decision the woman makes. I trust her."

He then quickly took another question, as sustained applause broke out.

Fox News reached out to O’Rourke’s campaign to confirm his position on third-trimester abortions but did not receive a reply.

Alexandra Desanctis, a staff writer at the conservative National Review, characterized O’Rourke’s remarks as a cynical sleight of hand.

“Notice how Beto takes an articulate question about abortion *after fetal viability* and the medical details of these procedures and restates it to the crowd as a question about “abortion and reproductive rights,” DeSanctis tweeted. “That’s what they have to do to defend third-trimester abortion."

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O’Rourke already has become known on the campaign trail for speaking in generalities, and it remained unclear whether he intended specifically to endorse third-term abortions during his comments on Monday. In January, O’Rourke sat for a widely panned interview with The Washington Post, during which he refused to offer specifics on an array of policy issues. Last week, O’Rourke said he was "kicking himself" for his answers during that interview — including when he offered the following prescription for the immigration crisis: "I don’t know."

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, last Friday. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke in Mount Pleasant, Iowa, last Friday. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

However, there was perhaps at least one clue as to O’Rourke’s intent in his career as a legislator. He co-sponsored the Women’s Health Protection Act when he was a Texas congressman in 2017 — a bill that would have lifted most state restrictions on abortion, including waiting periods.

Abortion already has emerged as a hot-button issue in the upcoming presidential campaign – as progressives fear that the new conservative majority on the Supreme Court could roll back abortion rights that have existed for generations, while conservatives have accused prominent Democrats of indifference to infanticide.

All prominent Democratic 2020 presidential hopefuls in the Senate last month voted down The Born-Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act last month, including Bernie Sanders of Vermont, Kamala Harris of California, Cory Booker of New Jersey, Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts.

The GOP-backed bill would have required "any health care practitioner present" at the time of a birth, including during a failed abortion, to "exercise the same degree of professional skill, care, and diligence to preserve the life and health of the child as a reasonably diligent and conscientious health care practitioner would render to any other child born alive at the same gestational age."

In response, President Trump tweeted that "This will be remembered as one of the most shocking votes in the history of Congress." Many Democrats had panned the bill as merely a stunt.

The legislation was introduced after Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, a Democrat, endorsed post-birth abortions while discussing The Repeal Act, a state bill which sought to repeal restrictions on third-trimester abortions. Virginia Democratic Del. Kathy Tran, a sponsor of that bill, was asked at a hearing if a woman about to give birth and dilating could still request an abortion.

"My bill would allow that, yes,” Tran said.

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Northam, in a later interview with a radio station, backed up Tran. "When we talk about third-trimester abortions, these are done with the consent of, obviously, the mother, with the consent of the physicians, more than one physician, by the way," he said. "And, it’s done in cases where there may be severe deformities, there may be a fetus that’s non-viable."

Northam continued: "So, in this particular example, if a mother is in labor, I can tell you exactly what would happen. The infant would be delivered. The infant would be kept comfortable. The infant would be resuscitated if that’s what the mother and the family desired, and then a discussion would ensue between the physicians and the mother. So, I think this was really blown out of proportion."

Fox News’ Patrick Ward contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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