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Tulane campus police have arrested three suspects, two men and one woman, in the arson fire at the dorm room door of two university students whose personal information had been spread online revealing their participation in a libertarian youth organization.

Robert Money, 21, David Shelton, 20, and Naima Okami, 20, will be facing counts of aggravated arson, according to Blake Arcuri, the general counsel of the Orleans Parish Sheriff’s Office in Louisiana. It’s unclear how the police identified the three individuals.

The fire reportedly happened on Saturday at 12:20 a.m., when sophomore Peyton Lofton, 20, says he received a text from his roommate and best friend, Jackson Arnold, 20, that their dorm room was on fire.

Lofton was out with friends at the time.

“It took a while for me to process last night when they said someone lit the door on fire," says Lofton. "I was originally really angry, stormed back to campus and once I got there reality started setting in. I was a little scared, a little nervous, I could have been sleeping…"

CALIFORNIA ARSON SUSPECT SOUGHT AFTER SPILLING, IGNITING FUEL AT GAS STATION, OFFICIALS SAY

Unlike Lofton, Arnold was in the room when it happened, but was not injured.

"I was in my room, and the fire alarm goes off. I go to open my door and the sign is on fire, so it was pretty small flame I blew it out and left," said Arnold. "I was feeling pretty mad, pissed off, I guess it was less of a scared feeling and more angry."

Arnold says Lofton was definitely angrier than he was, because it felt more personal for him.

It isn’t clear what motivated the attack, but Lofton says it’s possible the dorm room was targeted as a result of him being doxed a few days earlier for being a member of Young Americans for Liberty (YAL), a student political organization. Doxing is where someone posts personal information for others to find.

On March 17, the Twitter account associated with the handle, @YALexposed, posted a screenshot of his Facebook and mentioned he was a Tulane student. The screenshot read "Tulane’s own Peyton Lofton seems to like YAL’s offensive Facebook page."

Exposed sign and tweets from YALexposed

Exposed sign and tweets from YALexposed

Before that alleged doxxing attempt, he says signs were posted near campus, calling YAL a racist and misogynistic organization and exposing some of its members.

It’s not clear yet if the three people arrested were behind the @YALexposed Twitter handle. Lofton said he’s also had previous altercations with a student, but didn’t want to make anyone a target until all the facts are out.

After the alleged arson attack, residents were let back in the building at 1:20 a.m. and 40 minutes later the first officer arrived on the scene.

Lofton says Detective David Harris came to their dorm around 2:00 a.m. on Saturday morning and informed the two he was assigned to the case. They say he took the burned sign that was previously on the door as evidence and was reviewing security footage. It’s not clear if the footage he reviewed helped officers arrest the three suspects.

Lofton says the initial shock is wearing off and that his family lives 20 minutes away in case he ever feels unsafe. He says he won’t back down to people trying to spread fear.

“I don’t want to let them win, so I plan on staying on campus and not backing down and work twice as hard" said Lofton. "I trust that Tulane will handle the problem; I’m not naïve and still aware of the danger and trying to be as safe as possible.”

LOUISIANA FIREFIGHTER SAVES PREGNANT WOMAN FROM BURNING VEHICLE: GOD HAS SOMETHING MAJOR FOR YOU!

Charlie Kirk, founder of the conservative advocacy group Turning Point USA, tweeted about the incident. Kirk told Fox it’s a sick and sad day that someone would attempt an arson attack on another because of their beliefs.

"It’s a traumatic thing for anyone to go through, an attempted felony arson on property," Kirk told Fox. "But he’s [Peyton] very tough and wants to have people held accountable."

An aggravated arson charge could result in up to 20 years in prison, if convicted. It’s defined in Louisiana as intentionally setting a fire where it is foreseeable that human life is endangered.

There was no mention of the incident on the Tulane Police daily crime log.

Money and Shelton are students at Tulane while Okami attends Brown University, Mike Strecker, executive director of PR at Tulane, told TulaneHullabaloo.

Source: Fox News National

A Fox News analysis of political donations by the 50 individuals charged in the college admissions scandal shows that alleged corruption appears to know no political ideology.

Some of the alleged scammers made occasional contributions to individual candidates. Others, though, like Robert Flaxman, a real estate magnate who is charged in the scandal, gave small fortunes to both Republican and Democratic campaigns.

In 2012, Flaxman gave $50,000 to the Romney Victory Fund in support of Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney. Four years later, in 2016, the 62-year-old founder of Crown Realty and Development supported Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton with a donation of the same amount to the Hillary Victory Fund.

UCLA SOCCER COACH STEPS DOWN AMID COLLEGE ADMISSION SCANDAL BRIBERY ALLEGATIONS

Felicity Huffman, a star of the show Desperate Housewives, has consistently donated to Democratic campaigns. Since 2003, she’s given over $11,000, according to Political Money Line and FEC records.

Her donation history shows a notable level of support for Sen. Kamala Harris (D-Calif.) over the past couple of years. Starting in 2016, Huffman gave the Kamala Harris for Senate organization over $2,000 in contributions.

While Huffman’s donations are indicative of her politics, others ensnared in the scandal gave tens of thousands of dollars to both Democrat and Republican candidates.

FEC records show that Flaxman began donating in 2007 with a bevy of contributions to Republican campaigns, including $19,600 to support John McCain. That year, he also gave $10,000 to the California Republican Party.

BEN STILLER JOKES ABOUT COLLEGE ADMISSION SCANDAL, SAYS DAUGHTER WILL GO TO YALE ON A ‘FOOTBALL SCHOLARSHIP’

Some of the alleged scammers like Robert Flaxman (left) and Manuel Henriquez (right) gave small fortunes to both Republican and Democratic campaigns. Felicity Huffman's donations appear staunchly Democrat however.

Some of the alleged scammers like Robert Flaxman (left) and Manuel Henriquez (right) gave small fortunes to both Republican and Democratic campaigns. Felicity Huffman’s donations appear staunchly Democrat however. (Getty/Getty/Linkedin)

Most of Flaxman’s donations are small dollar amounts made to individual campaigns in 2016, but several top $2,000 – including $30,800 he gave to the Republican National Committee in 2012.

In 2016, he made at least 43 contributions to various candidates and party organizations. Again, his donations were bipartisan. The real estate magnate gave $2,700 to Hillary Clinton’s campaign for president and $33,400 to the Democratic National Convention. He also donated $2,700 to the Indiana Republican State Committee and the same amount to the campaign of Sen. Todd Young, an Indiana Republican.

Others had similarly bipartisan patterns of political donations. Manuel Henriquez, the founder of Hercules Capital who has been charged in the scandal, has given thousands of dollars to Democrat and Republican causes. In 2017, he donated $2,000 to Rep. Steve Stivers (R-OH) and in 2012 he gave $10,000 to the Obama Victory Fund.

Outside of his donation to Stivers, Henriquez, who began donating between 2003 and 2004, has largely supported Democratic causes. In 2004, he made a pair of $5,000 donations to the Democratic National Committee.

LORI LOUGHLIN DAUGHTERS ‘NOT TALKING ABOUT FUTURE PLANS’ AMID ‘NIGHTMARE’ COLLEGE ADMISSIONS SCANDAL: REPORT

The reasons for bipartisan donations are myriad, according to Brendan Quinn, a spokesperson at the Center for Responsive Politics. He said a donor supporting both Democrat and Republican candidates could be a simple as them having a personal connection or preference for the candidates.

Although Quinn couldn’t speak to the specific motivations of the Flaxman and others, he said it’s not uncommon for business owners and others to curry political favor with their donations.

A notable presence in the records of many of the donors is ActBlue, a PAC that aims to “democratize power and help small-dollar donors make their voices heard,” according to its website. Since its founding in 2004, the organization has raised more than $1 billion for Democratic candidates.

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Although the majority of the 50 indicted individuals have no history of donating to political causes, several of the ones that do have given small fortunes to politicians. Although California voter registrations are not readily available, the pattern of donations for several of the people shows strong democratic inclinations. Others, it appears, follow less stringent ideological lines with their political philanthropy.

Source: Fox News National

If you are a conservative on a college campus, get ready to be bullied.

That’s the warning College of Charleston student Charlotte Townsend delivered during an interview on "Fox & Friends" Friday morning after detailing her experiences, including one case when political posters she put up were ripped down almost immediately.

“A fellow conservative and were putting up posters around campus and within 15 minutes they had been torn down and destroyed,” Charlotte Townsend said.

“Shortly after we confronted the vandal and he proceeded to say that it was his free speech to tear down our free speech.”

FLASHBACK: CONSERVATIVE ACTIVIST ATTACKED ON UC-BERKELEY CAMPUS DURING RECRUITMENT DRIVE

People need to respect one another’s opinions rather than silencing an opinion that they do not agree with

— College of Charleston sophomore Charlotte Townsend

“Before arriving on campus, I had heard the political climate in college was hard on conservatives. I didn’t realize what ‘hard’ meant until I took the hits myself. I live in a world where many of my peers are too afraid to support conservatism in front of their friends,” Townsend wrote in an op-ed published by The Federalist.

The college sophomore said conservative groups on campus have even been forced to take their concerns to college administrators.

“I know several other student groups that are conservative have gone to them, explaining that they do not feel their voices are being heard on campus,” Townsend said.

TRUMP SIGNS EXECUTIVE ORDER TO PROMOTE FREE SPEECH ON COLLEGE CAMPUS’

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES - Demonstrators seen holding placards during the Climate Strike at Columbia University in New York City, NY. (Photo by Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

NEW YORK, NY, UNITED STATES – Demonstrators seen holding placards during the Climate Strike at Columbia University in New York City, NY. (Photo by Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images)

“I think this is an issue that has a lot to do with people’s character. People need to respect one another’s opinions rather than silencing an opinion that they do not agree with."

Townsend’s warning came after President Trump signed an executive order promoting free speech on college campuses by threatening colleges with the loss of federal research funding if they do not protect those rights on Thursday.

"We’re here to take historic action to defend American students and American values," Trump said, surrounded by conservative student activists at the signing ceremony. "They’ve been under siege."

Fox News’ Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

The University of Mississippi’s leader says he agrees that a Confederate soldier monument should be moved from its current spot on campus.

Interim Chancellor Larry Sparks issued a statement Thursday that he’s discussing relocation with historic preservation officials.

Student, faculty and staff groups passed resolutions earlier this month asking Sparks to move the monument to a secluded Confederate cemetery on campus. Sparks hadn’t announced until Thursday that he agreed.

College Board trustees, who govern Mississippi’s eight public universities, ultimately must approve it.

Before any move, the university must consult with the Mississippi Department of Archives and History.

Ole Miss has struggled to distance itself from Confederate imagery, installing plaques with historical context about the monument and about slaves who built some campus buildings before the Civil War.

Source: Fox News National

Harvard University is being sued for “shamelessly” making a profit from photos of two 19th-century slaves despite requests to turn the photographs over to the slaves’ descendants.

Tamara Lanier filed a lawsuit against the institution Wednesday for “wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation” of images she claims features two of her ancestors.

The suit demands the university turn over the photos to her, admit her ancestry and pay an unspecified sum in damages.

AMERICANS SEE COLLEGE ADMISSIONS AS RIGGED FOR WEALTHY, OPPOSE SPECIAL TREATMENT: POLL

The legal action stems from a series of photos taken in 1850 that feature two South Carolina slaves identified as Renty and his daughter, Delia. The images are thought to be the earliest known photos of American slaves and were commissioned by Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz whose theories on racial difference were used to justify slavery in the country.

This July 17, 2018 copy photo shows an 1850 Daguerreotype of Renty, a South Carolina slave who Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, Conn., said is her family's patriarch. The portrait was commissioned by Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans in the United States. Lanier filed a lawsuit on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, in Massachusetts state court, demanding that Harvard turn over the photo and pay damages.

This July 17, 2018 copy photo shows an 1850 Daguerreotype of Renty, a South Carolina slave who Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, Conn., said is her family’s patriarch. The portrait was commissioned by Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans in the United States. Lanier filed a lawsuit on Wednesday, March 20, 2019, in Massachusetts state court, demanding that Harvard turn over the photo and pay damages. (Courtesy of Harvard University/The Norwich Bulletin via AP)

“To Agassiz, Renty and Delia were nothing more than research specimens,” the suit reads. “The violence of compelling them to participate in a degrading exercise designed to prove their own subhuman status would not have occurred to him, let alone mattered.”

The lawsuit claims Harvard exploited the image of Renty during a 2017 conference and other through other uses, while charging a “hefty” licensing fee for anyone else to reproduce the pictures. The suit adds that Harvard also sells a $40 book with Renty’s portrait on the cover.

Lanier demands Harvard admit it played a role in the humiliation of Renty and Delia and that the institution “was complicit in perpetuating and justifying the institution of slavery.”

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI FIRES CAMPUS COP OVER BLACKFACE PHOTO

She argues she’s the rightful owner of the photos as Renty’s next of kin, while claiming that neither Harvard nor Agassiz could legally own the photos because they never received the subjects’ consent.

Tamara Lanier, left, and attorney Benjamin Crump, right arrive for a news conference near the Harvard Club Wednesday, March 20, 2019, in New York. Lanier, of Norwich, Conn., is suing the Harvard University for "wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation" of images she says depict two of her ancestors.

Tamara Lanier, left, and attorney Benjamin Crump, right arrive for a news conference near the Harvard Club Wednesday, March 20, 2019, in New York. Lanier, of Norwich, Conn., is suing the Harvard University for "wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation" of images she says depict two of her ancestors. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

The woman’s suit also says Harvard’s continued possession of the images violates the 13th Amendment that abolished slavery.

“Renty is 169 years a slave by our calculation," civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, one of Lanier’s lawyers, told the media. “How long will it be before Harvard finally frees Renty?”

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Crump said the case would allow Harvard to “remove the stain from its legacy” and show it has the courage “to finally atone for slavery.”

Source: Fox News National

The University of Southern California on Wednesday announced a new school president to usher "a new era" following a series of high-profile scandals that culminated last week with a massive college admissions bribery case.

Carol Folt, former chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, will become USC’s 12th president and the first permanent female president in school history — an announcement that came a week after news of the bribery scandal broke.

Folt said the scandal didn’t give her pause about taking on the job.

"I want to be a part of fixing this," Folt said. "If you’re trying to run an institution, you have to enjoy the fixing as well as the advancing."

Folt said she was horrified to learn of the scheme, which involved wealthy parents paying bribes to have a college counselor rig standardized tests or get their children admitted as recruits of sports they didn’t play.

"Most of us (at universities) spend our lives caring about students and admissions and trying to do things fairly … so when you see something like that, you’re just aghast," she said. "But most of us immediately started thinking, ‘OK, boy, we know how to get to the bottom of this, we’re going to figure this out and that is not something I want to ever see happen again.’ "

Rick Caruso, chairman of the USC board of trustees, said problems will occur, but the measure of great leadership is how one reacts to them.

"We have worked hard to try to turn a corner, to make a change," Caruso said. "Today firmly cements the fact that there is a dramatic cultural change in this university."

A lengthy search for a new president led a 23-member committee to unanimously recommend Folt, Caruso said.

"If nothing else, this last nine months has shown us that this university can handle whatever’s thrown at us," he said. "We are ready to move forward."

Folt will take over USC from interim President Wanda Austin, who stepped in after former President C.L. Max Nikias resigned last summer amid two major controversies: reports that the school ignored complaints of widespread sexual misconduct by a longtime campus gynecologist and an investigation into a medical school dean accused of smoking methamphetamine with a woman who overdosed.

Combined with the bribery scandal, Folt will have her work cut out for her, said Roger Sloboda, a Dartmouth biology professor who worked with Folt at the New Hampshire school, where she started her academic career and spent three decades.

"Considering the recent stuff at USC, I feel sorry for Carol jumping into that mess. But I think she’ll clean it up," he said. "She is a scientist and she’ll look at the data, figure out what happened and how to fix it."

From a crisis standpoint at her previous job at UNC-Chapel Hill, Folt did just OK, said Jay Schalin, policy analysis director at the James G. Martin Center for Academic Renewal, a right-leaning think tank.

At UNC, Folt inherited a department that offered irregular courses with significant athlete enrollments dating back years before her arrival. The courses were misidentified as lecture classes that didn’t meet, required a research paper or two for typically high grades with little to no faculty oversight.

Folt also was forced out early from the job in January amid a controversy over a Confederate statue known as "Silent Sam" that was torn down on campus.

Schalin said Folt angered conservatives in North Carolina with "mixed signals" on Silent Sam that they felt emboldened protesters.

As far the academic scandal involving UNC athletes, he said the USC scandal seems smaller in scope. "Folt should have little trouble managing it, unless the media goes after USC in a major way," he said.

The president of the Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, where Folt served as chair of a committee on science and technology policy, said he has always "admired her insights and wisdom on ways universities can better serve students and the public at large."

"Carol Folt is a very accomplished and highly respected higher education leader," association President Peter McPherson said in a statement.

Four USC students showed up to Folt’s introduction at USC holding protesting her actions during the Confederate statue controversy, saying she took credit for taking it down when it really was a student-led movement.

One of the students, Rebecca Hu, said she wanted to make her concerns known and felt students should have been more heavily involved in the selection of a new president.

"I think the student community is really hurt by everyone in USC administration, and we just want to make sure they actually hear us for once and take us seriously," said Hu, a senior majoring in philosophy.

Jason Chang, a 20-year-old accounting major, said he and his fellow students "just want transparency" about the unfolding scandal.

"It’s sad to say that it’s tainting the school’s reputation," he said.

Graduate student Myla Bastien also called for transparency and honesty. "I think that if USC just owns it, and then comes up with a plan to prevent it from happening in the future, that would be helpful," she said.

Folt said she’s committed to addressing student concerns and that the university is off to "an amazing start."

"I think people have been very honest and forthright about it," she said. "I’m certainly not being encouraged to be anything but direct and open and honest and to try to do this the right way. That’s really critical."

___

Associated Press writers Christopher Weber and John Antczak in Los Angeles, Jonathan Drew in Raleigh, North Carolina, and Jocelyn Gecker in San Francisco contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

Harvard University has "shamelessly" turned a profit from photos of two 19th-century slaves while ignoring requests to turn the photos over to the slaves’ descendants, according to a lawsuit filed Wednesday.

Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, Connecticut, is suing the Ivy League school for "wrongful seizure, possession and expropriation" of images she says depict two of her ancestors. Her suit, filed in Massachusetts state court, demands that Harvard immediately turn over the photos, acknowledge her ancestry and pay an unspecified sum in damages.

Harvard spokesman Jonathan Swain said the university "has not yet been served, and with that is in no position to comment on this complaint."

At the center of the case is a series of 1850 daguerreotypes, an early type of photo, taken of two South Carolina slaves identified as Renty and his daughter, Delia. Both were posed shirtless and photographed from several angles. The images are believed to be the earliest known photos of American slaves.

They were commissioned by Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose theories on racial difference were used to support slavery in the U.S. The lawsuit says Agassiz came across Renty and Delia while touring plantations in search of racially "pure" slaves born in Africa.

"To Agassiz, Renty and Delia were nothing more than research specimens," the suit says. "The violence of compelling them to participate in a degrading exercise designed to prove their own subhuman status would not have occurred to him, let alone mattered."

The suit attacks Harvard for its "exploitation" of Renty’s image at a 2017 conference and in other uses. It says Harvard has capitalized on the photos by demanding a "hefty" licensing fee to reproduce the images. It also draws attention to a book Harvard sells for $40 with Renty’s portrait on the cover. The, called "From Site to Sight: Anthropology, Photography, and the Power of Imagery," explores the use of photography in anthropology.

Among other demands, the suit asks Harvard to acknowledge that it bears responsibility for the humiliation of Renty and Delia, and that Harvard "was complicit in perpetuating and justifying the institution of slavery."

A researcher at a Harvard museum rediscovered the photos in storage in 1976. But Lanier’s case argues Agassiz never legally owned the photos because he didn’t have his subjects’ consent, and that he didn’t have the right to pass them to Harvard. Instead, the suit says, Lanier is the rightful owner as Renty’s next of kin.

The suit also argues that Harvard’s continued possession of the images violates the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery.

"Renty is 169 years a slave by our calculation," civil rights attorney Benjamin Crump, one of Lanier’s lawyers, said in an interview. "How long will it be before Harvard finally frees Renty?"

Lanier says she grew up hearing stories about Renty passed down from her mother. While enslaved in Columbia, South Carolina, the suit says, Renty taught himself to read and later held secret Bible readings on the plantation. He is described as "small in stature but towering in the minds of those who knew him."

The suit says Lanier has verified her genealogical ties to Renty, whom she calls "Papa Renty." She says he is her great-great-great-grandfather.

If given the photos, Lanier said she would "the true story of who Renty was." But she also hopes her case will spark a national discussion over race and history.

"This case is important because it will test the more climate of this country, and force this country to reckon with its long history of racism," Lanier said at a news conference outside the Harvard Club of New York City.

Crump, her attorney, added that the case could allow Harvard to "remove the stain from its legacy" and show it has the courage "to finally atone for slavery."

Lanier alleges that she wrote to Harvard in 2011 detailing her ties to Renty. In a letter to Drew Faust, then Harvard’s president, Lanier said she wanted to learn more about the images and how they would be used. She was more explicit in 2017, demanding that Harvard relinquish the photos. In both cases, she said, Harvard responded but evaded her requests.

The school has used the photos as part of its own effort to confront its historical ties to slavery. At the 2017 conference called "Universities and Slavery: Bound by History," referenced in the lawsuit, Harvard printed Renty’s portrait on the program cover and projected it on a giant screen above the stage.

In the image, Renty stares hauntingly into the camera, his hair graying and his gaunt frame exposed.

Lanier, who was in the audience at the event, said she was stunned by a passage in the program that described the origins of the photo but seemed to dismiss her genealogical findings. It said that the photo was taken for Agassiz’s research and that "while Agassiz earned acclaim, Renty returned to invisibility."

The suit alleges that "by contesting Ms. Lanier’s claim of lineage, Harvard is shamelessly capitalizing on the intentional damage done to black Americans’ genealogy by a century’s worth of policies that forcibly separated families, erased slaves’ family names, withheld birth and death records, and criminalized literacy."

___

Follow Collin Binkley on Twitter at https://twitter.com/cbinkley

Source: Fox News National

The Latest on a lawsuit over images held by Harvard University of slaves (all times local):

3:40 p.m.

A woman suing Harvard University over portraits of two slaves says she hopes her lawsuit sparks a national reckoning with its history of racism.

Tamara Lanier said at a news conference outside the Harvard Club of New York City on Wednesday that her case is important because "it will test the moral climate of this country."

Lanier’s lawsuit says Harvard has wrongly withheld and profited from 1850 portraits of two slaves who Lanier says are her ancestors.

Harvard says it has not been served with the lawsuit and is not in a position to comment.

The suit says the photos were commissioned by former Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support slavery.

It says Harvard requires "hefty" licensing fees to reproduce the photos.

___

12:20 p.m.

Harvard University says it is not in a position to comment on a lawsuit complaining it has profited from images of two 19th-century slaves.

Spokesman Jonathan Swain said Wednesday that the Ivy League university has not yet been served with the lawsuit.

Tamara Lanier says in her lawsuit that Harvard has ignored her request to turn over the photos. The woman from Norwich, Connecticut, says the slaves depicted in the photos are her ancestors.

Lanier’s suit says the photos were commissioned by former Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans.

The lawsuit says Harvard requires "hefty" licensing fees to reproduce the photos, and has used one image on the cover of a book.

___

10 a.m.

A Connecticut woman says Harvard University has "shamelessly" turned a profit from images of two 19th-century slaves she says are her ancestors.

Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, says in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that Harvard has ignored her request to turn over the photos. Her lawsuit in Massachusetts state court asks Harvard to relinquish them and pay unspecified damages.

A message was left with Harvard seeking comment.

The images depict a South Carolina slave named Renty and his daughter, Delia. Lanier says she is a direct descendant.

Lanier’s suit says the photos were commissioned by former Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans.

The lawsuit says Harvard requires "hefty" licensing fees to reproduce the photos, and has used one image on the cover of a book.

Source: Fox News National

The University of Southern California has announced a new president to usher in "a new era."

The university said Wednesday that Carol Folt will become the university’s 12th president. The announcement comes a week after news broke of a massive college bribery scandal involving USC and other universities across the country.

Folt most recently was chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

She will become USC’s president on July 1, taking over from interim President Wanda Austin, who stepped in after former President C.L. Max Nikias resigned last summer.

Nikias stepped down amid reports the school ignored complaints of widespread sexual misconduct by a longtime campus gynecologist.

USC says Folt will "promote positive cultural change and uphold the highest values of excellence, integrity and trust across USC."

Source: Fox News National

The Latest on a lawsuit over images held by Harvard University of slaves (all times local):

12:20 p.m.

Harvard University says it is not in a position to comment on a lawsuit complaining it has profited from images of two 19th-century slaves.

Spokesman Jonathan Swain said Wednesday that the Ivy League university has not yet been served with the lawsuit.

Tamara Lanier says in her lawsuit that Harvard has ignored her request to turn over the photos. The woman from Norwich, Connecticut, says the slaves depicted in the photos are her ancestors.

Lanier’s suit says the photos were commissioned by former Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans.

The lawsuit says Harvard requires "hefty" licensing fees to reproduce the photos, and has used one image on the cover of a book.

___

10 a.m.

A Connecticut woman says Harvard University has "shamelessly" turned a profit from images of two 19th-century slaves she says are her ancestors.

Tamara Lanier, of Norwich, says in a lawsuit filed Wednesday that Harvard has ignored her request to turn over the photos. Her lawsuit in Massachusetts state court asks Harvard to relinquish them and pay unspecified damages.

A message was left with Harvard seeking comment.

The images depict a South Carolina slave named Renty and his daughter, Delia. Lanier says she is a direct descendant.

Lanier’s suit says the photos were commissioned by former Harvard biologist Louis Agassiz, whose ideas were used to support the enslavement of Africans.

The lawsuit says Harvard requires "hefty" licensing fees to reproduce the photos, and has used one image on the cover of a book.

Source: Fox News National


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