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The climate change activists who have disrupted transportation around London in recent weeks continued to their outlandish demonstrations by gluing themselves to the London Stock Exchange building on what is supposedly their “last day” of protests.

The group – who call themselves Extinction Rebellion – also climbed onto the roof of a train in Canary Wharf as part of the latest wave of protests on Thursday. They said the demonstrations targeted the financial section “to demand they tell the truth about the devastating impact the industry has on our planet.”

Extinction Rebellion climate protesters form a line after glueing themselves to the entrances of the London Stock Exchange in the City of London, Thursday April 25, 2019.

Extinction Rebellion climate protesters form a line after glueing themselves to the entrances of the London Stock Exchange in the City of London, Thursday April 25, 2019. (Isabel Infantes/PA via AP)

“The global financial industry is currently enabling climate and ecological destruction on an almost unimaginable level, and a considerable proportion of this money flows through London. ‘Business as usual,’ especially through the toxic finance system, will kill all life on this planet,” the group said in a statement.

The self-described “rebels” made headlines in recent weeks by snarling traffic and public transit in the British capital through a series of blockades. Members also stripped down to their underwear in the public gallery at the House of Commons earlier this month.

EXTINCTION REBELLION CLIMATE GROUP CALLING IT QUITS ON LONDON PROTESTS

Extinction Rebellion climate change protesters briefly block the road in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. The non-violent protest group, Extinction Rebellion, is seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority.

Extinction Rebellion climate change protesters briefly block the road in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. The non-violent protest group, Extinction Rebellion, is seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

The demonstrations on Thursday – which began when two men and five women glued themselves to a wall and to each other at the London Stock Exchange at around 6:45 a.m. – come a day after the group said they were packing up and heading home.

“We will leave the physical locations and but a space for truth-telling has been opened up in the world,” Extinction Rebellion said in a statement. “We know we have disrupted your lives. We do not do this lightly. We only do this because this is an emergency.”

The group threatened more small “actions” across the financial district on Thursday including demonstrations outside banks like Goldman Sachs, the Bank of England and Deutsche Bank.

Police remove an Extinction Rebellion climate change protester who blocked a road outside the Goldman Sachs office in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019.

Police remove an Extinction Rebellion climate change protester who blocked a road outside the Goldman Sachs office in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

On Thursday, five other members climbed aboard a Docklands Light Railway (DLR) train in Canary Wharf in London, holding signs saying “business as usual = death” and “don’t jail the canaries.”

British Transport Police officers used ropes, harnesses, and ladders to remove the demonstrators, which included an 83-year-old, Sky News reported. All five were arrested on suspicion of obstructing the railway.

One woman glued herself to the train.

“It’s bizarre we have to do this in order for governments to listen to scientists,” Diana Warner, 60, told Sky News.

Extinction Rebellion climate change protesters are being removed from a road block by police, outside the Goldman Sachs International office in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. The non-violent protest group, Extinction Rebellion, is seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority. 

Extinction Rebellion climate change protesters are being removed from a road block by police, outside the Goldman Sachs International office in the City of London, Thursday, April 25, 2019. The non-violent protest group, Extinction Rebellion, is seeking negotiations with the government on its demand to make slowing climate change a top priority.  (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

CLIMATE GROUP’S ATTEMPT TO ‘SHUT DOWN’ LONDON HEATHROW AIRPORT FAILS AFTER ONLY A FEW HANDFULS OF PEOPLE SHOW UP

More than 1,000 protesters have been arrested since the disruptive demonstrations began more than a week ago. Only about 70 are currently facing charges, the Associated Press reported.

At the height of the protests, London’s busy Waterloo Bridge was closed for days and rail travel was temporarily delayed after demonstrators glued themselves to the sides of train cars.

Among those supporting the protesters was Oscar-winning actress Emma Thompson, who flew from Los Angeles to London to join in on the demonstrations last week.

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Speaking to a crowd in Oxford Circus, Thompson, according to the Associated Press, remarked that “it makes me so happy to be able to join you all and to add my voice to the young people here who have inspired a whole new movement.”

Then, while in conversation with reporters, she admitted that “unfortunately sometimes I have to fly but I don’t fly nearly as much as I did, because of my carbon footprint and I plant a lot of trees.”

Fox News’ Greg Norman contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News World

London-based Barclays bank says it may cut costs if “challenging” economic conditions persists throughout the year.

The warning came as the bank said Thursday that revenue dropped 2% to 5.25 billion pounds ($6.77 billion) in the first quarter of 2019. Pre-tax profit from Barclays’ corporate and investment banking business fell 30%.

Barclays says the “income environment in the quarter was challenging” and it will reduce spending “if this were to persist for the remainder of the year.”

The bank says it has already cut bonus and compensation payouts across the corporate and investment bank to reflect the division’s poor performance.

Barclays reported quarterly net income of 1.04 billion pounds, compared with a year-earlier loss of 764 million pounds, when the bank set aside 2 billion pounds to cover misconduct.

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The climate activist group that has disrupted travel recently in the London area announced Wednesday that its members — including the ones who apparently have been sitting in trees for days — are packing up and heading home.

Extinction Rebellion and its self-described “rebels” made headlines last week after snarling traffic and public transit in the U.K.’s capital through a series of blockades and demonstrations. The group, which is trying to force the British Parliament into accepting their climate action-related demands, now says its members will leave protest sites at the Marble Arch and Parliament Square tomorrow.

“We will leave the physical locations but a space for truth-telling has been opened up in the world,” Extinction Rebellion said in a statement. “We know we have disrupted your lives. We do not do this lightly. We only do this because this is an emergency.”

The group’s statement also thanked its supporters for putting their “bodies on the line”.

CLIMATE GROUP’S ATTEMPT TO ‘SHUT DOWN’ LONDON HEATHROW AIRPORT FAILS AFTER ONLY A FEW HANDFULS OF PEOPLE SHOW UP

Since the demonstrations began last Monday, police have arrested more than 1,000 of the protesters, but only about 70 are currently facing charges, the Associated Press reports.

At the height of the protests, London’s busy Waterloo Bridge was closed for days and rail travel was temporarily delayed after demonstrators glued themselves to the sides of train cars.

But the protesters’ momentum appeared to hit a major snag Friday when a hyped-up claim to “shut down” London’s Heathrow Airport turned out to be a flop.

Protesters are seen in the trees during a climate protest in Parliament Square, in London, on Tuesday. (AP)

Protesters are seen in the trees during a climate protest in Parliament Square, in London, on Tuesday. (AP)

Extinction Rebellion also has faced criticism for their protest tactics. Some have pointed out that despite wanting to save the Earth, the climate protesters have actually doing harm to it by snarling more environmentally-friendly public transit systems and forcing cars and buses to idle in gridlock traffic – and therefore belch exhaust into the atmosphere – as a result of their disruptions and roadblocks.

Oscar-winning actress Emma Thompson faced similar criticism after she flew from Los Angeles to London to join in on the demonstrations last week.

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Police arrest protesters at Oxford Circus in London on Friday.

Police arrest protesters at Oxford Circus in London on Friday. (AP)

Speaking to a crowd in Oxford Circus, Thompson, according to the Associated Press, remarked that “it makes me so happy to be able to join you all and to add my voice to the young people here who have inspired a whole new movement.”

Then, while in conversation with reporters, she admitted that “unfortunately sometimes I have to fly but I don’t fly nearly as much as I did, because of my carbon footprint and I plant a lot of trees.”

Source: Fox News World

UK Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt fired back at a claim by the outgoing French ambassador to the U.S. that Britain’s influence in Washington, D.C. has “vanished” — saying the U.K. “will not take any lessons” from the French in having good relations with America.

“Mon cher ami [Gerard Araud] I am sure you enjoyed making hay with the UK’s temporary Brexit travails but until there is a French President’s bust in the Oval Office we will not take any lessons in having good relations with Washington,” Hunt tweeted, along with a picture of President Trump and UK Prime Minister Theresa May standing next to the bust of former PM Winston Churchill.

TRUMP TO VISIT UK, FRANCE IN JUNE FOR D-DAY ANNIVERSARY

His tweet was attached with a winking emoji, indicating the tweet was perhaps meant to be taken lightly — but it comes after Araud, who is leaving his post as France’s representative to Washington, said that British influence has disappeared.

“The UK has vanished,” Araud told The Financial Times. “The British ambassador told me — and I loved it — that every time the British military is meeting with the American military, the Americans are talking about the French.”

Araud has been on something of a tear as he departs the capital, giving a series of interviews in which he has weighed in on current affairs in often-undiplomatic language.

In an interview with Foreign Policy last week, he drew a stark contrast between the presidencies of Barack Obama and Trump.

FRENCH AMBASSADOR BLASTS ‘BIG MOUTH’ TRUMP, SAYS HE READS ‘BASICALLY NOTHING’

“On one side, you had this ultimate bureaucrat, an introvert, basically a bit aloof, a restrained president. A bit arrogant also but basically somebody who every night was going to bed with 60-page briefings and the next day they were sent back annotated by the president,” he said, referring to Obama.

“And suddenly you have this president who is an extrovert, really a big mouth, who reads basically nothing or nearly nothing, with the interagency process totally broken and decisions taken from the hip basically.”

Outgoing Ambassador of France to the United States Gerard Araud has said the British influence in Washington has "vanished." (Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Outgoing Ambassador of France to the United States Gerard Araud has said the British influence in Washington has “vanished.” (Photo by Amanda Edwards/WireImage)

Both Britain and France have had tumultuous relationships with the U.S. since Trump entered the White House. The White House announced Tuesday that Trump will travel to both countries in June to mark the anniversary of the D-Day landings — which will include a state visit to London.

Trump has repeatedly backed Britain’s departure from the European Union, and recently called for a “large scale Trade Deal with the United Kingdom” once it leaves, but has also criticized May’s handling of the negotiations.

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Meanwhile, Trump described French President Emmanuel Macron as “perfect” when he visited the White House last year, before the relationship soured over issues such as NATO funding, tariffs and Trump’s decision to begin withdrawing from Syria.

Macron would go on to mull a European army to “protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America” — which led Trump to point to the French surrender to Germany in World War II, and to knock Macron’s low approval ratings.

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Climate change protesters who have brought parts of central London to a standstill for days say they will lift their blockades.

The group Extinction Rebellion says it will end its remaining demonstrations at Marble Arch and Parliament Square on Thursday.

Last week, the protesters blocked Waterloo Bridge and major intersections including Marble Arch and Oxford Circus, snarling traffic and disrupting bus routes.

The civil disobedience movement saw tented protest sites sprouting around the capital. More than 1,000 people were arrested as police tried to clear the sites, though only about 70 have been charged.

Extinction Rebellion thanked Londoners in a statement Wednesday, saying: “We know we have disrupted your lives. We do not do this lightly. We only do this because this is an emergency.”

Source: Fox News World

Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon on Wednesday announced plans for a second referendum on Scottish independence before 2021, less than five years after Scots rejected the vote on separating from the rest of the United Kingdom.

Sturgeon, leader of the pro-independence Scottish National Party, cited the uncertainty around Britain’s departure from the European Union as a motivating factor for the push.

PELOSI UNDERMINES TRUMP ABROAD ON US-UK TRADE DEAL, SAYS ‘NO CHANCE’ IF BREXIT HURTS IRISH PEACE ACCORD

“If we are to safeguard Scotland’s interests, we cannot wait indefinitely. That is why I consider that a choice between Brexit and a future for Scotland as an independent European nation should be offered in the lifetime of this Parliament,” she told Scottish lawmakers in Holyrood.

First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon issues a statement on Brexit and independence in the main chamber at the Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, Wednesday April 24, 2019.  (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

First Minister of Scotland Nicola Sturgeon issues a statement on Brexit and independence in the main chamber at the Scottish Parliament, Edinburgh, Wednesday April 24, 2019.  (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The next Scottish election is scheduled for May 2021.

“If Scotland is taken out of the E.U., the option of a referendum on independence within that timescale must be open to us. That would be our route to avoiding the worst of the damage Brexit will do,” she said

Scotland voted to remain within the United Kingdom in a 2014 referendum by a vote of 55-45 percent, but a majority of the country also voted to remain within the European Union in 2016 by a margin of 62-38 percent — although the U.K. as a whole voted to leave.

It has led Sturgeon and others in favor of independence to argue that Scotland is being taken out of the E.U. without its permission — giving them a reason for a second referendum.

That process has been dogged by complications and delays, with the U.K. Parliament voting down Prime Minister Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement multiple times, leading to a delay of Britain’s departure until as late as Oct. 31. That vote has also seen calls for a second referendum amid the lengthy delay.

Any push for Scottish independence would require approval by the British government. May’s government has consistently rebuffed calls for a second Brexit referendum, saying that such a move would be a betrayal of the British people’s vote. It would, therefore, be unlikely to also grant a second Scottish referendum, particularly as May’s Conservative Party has been consistently opposed to Scottish independence, although May’s predecessor David Cameron’s government agreed to the 2014 referendum.

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Scottish Secretary David Mundell said in a statement Wednesday that Scots “voted decisively in 2014 to remain part of the U.K., on a promise that the referendum would settle the issue for a generation.”

“Instead of respecting that result, Nicola Sturgeon continues to press for divisive constitutional change when it is clear that most people in Scotland do not want another independence referendum,” he said. “The UK government will stand up for them.”

Source: Fox News World

More than 350 people were killed in bombings of churches and hotels in Sri Lanka on Easter Sunday.

Some details on the victims:

___

SRI LANKA

The vast majority of victims were Sri Lankan, many from the nation’s Christian minority. Their names and details of their lives were slow to trickle in and difficult to report, in part because authorities blocked most social media after the blasts.

Colombo archbishop Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith says at least 110 people were killed at St. Sebastian’s Church in Negombo, a seaside town that’s the center of Sri Lanka’s small Catholic community

Sneha Savindi, 12, was among them. Her uncle, Duminda, said her badly wounded body was only identifiable by a birthmark on her foot. Stroking the sealed coffin, Savindi’s aunt, Lalitha, said, “I wanted to see you as a bride, but now you’re in this box.”

The Shangri-La Hotel in Colombo, the capital, said three of its employees died at work.

At the hotel restaurant, Nisanga Mayadunne posted a selfie on Facebook showing her and her relatives around a table, eating eggs and sausages. Moments later, she and her mother, Shantha Mayadunne, were killed.

Shantha was an acclaimed chef who hosted live cooking programs on Sri Lankan television.

“They were the most loving family anyone could ask for,” Manik Mayadunne, Nisanga’s cousin, wrote on his Facebook page Monday.

In some places, the violence struck entire families. On Easter Sunday, as they did every Sunday, Berlington Joseph Gomez, 33, and his wife, Chandrika Arumugam, 31, went to church at Colombo’s St. Anthony’s Shrine. As always, they brought their three sons: 9-year-old Bevon, 6-year-old Clavon and baby Avon, just 11 months old.

Two days later, they were all being mourned by dozens of neighbors gathered at the modest home of Berlington’s father, Joseph Gomez.

Candles burned beside three coffins and women sang hymns. The bodies of two grandsons have yet to be recovered.

“All family, all generation, is lost,” Gomez said.

Negombo resident Herman Peiris lost two sisters and two nieces — one of whom was about to get married. He said his sisters, Celine and Elizabeth, spent most of their time as involved members at St. Sebastian church, and now people in the community are afraid to go there. He called for more security and for leaders to take both the blame and action.

“We villagers, or civil people, we can’t do much,” Peiris said.

Carpenter Dileep Roshan, 37, left behind a wife and daughter, his family said.

“His wife and daughter won’t be able to do much now because he is gone,” said his older brother, Sanjeevani Roshan. “The real question is what will happen to their future.”

In addition to the suicide attacks at the hotels and churches, authorities have said two people were killed at a guesthouse and three police officers were killed by an explosion later Sunday that was set off by suspects trying to evade arrest.

___

UNITED KINGDOM

Sri Lanka’s top diplomat in Britain says authorities know of eight British nationals killed in the bombings.

Londoner Matthew Linsey’s 15-year-old daughter, Amelie, and 19-year-old son, Daniel, died on the final day of their holiday while in the Shangri-La Hotel in Colombo. They apparently survived the first explosion but were killed by a second. Linsey described the event to The Times of London newspaper: “People were screaming. I was with my children. I couldn’t tell whether they were all right; it was dark. I was worried there would be another blast. We ran out — another blast.”

Lawyer Anita Nicholson, son Alex Nicholson and daughter Annabel Nicholson also died while on holiday and sitting at the Shangri-la Hotel restaurant, her husband, Ben Nicholson, said in a statement. He said, “The holiday we had just enjoyed was a testament to Anita’s enjoyment of travel and providing a rich and colorful life for our family, and especially our children.”

Former firefighter Bill Harrop and doctor Sally Bradley, a British couple who lived in Australia, were killed in one of the hotels, a family statement to The Australian newspaper said.

___

INDIA

The Indian Embassy in Colombo says 10 Indian nationals died in the blasts.

H.D. Kumaraswamy, the chief minister of southern Karnataka state, mourned the deaths of two fellow Janata Dal Secular party members, K.G. Hanumantharayappa and M. Rangappa.

“I am deeply shocked at the loss of our JDS party workers, whom I know personally,” he wrote Monday on Twitter.

___

UNITED STATES

The State Department says at least four Americans were killed and several others seriously injured. It did not identify the victims.

Fifth-grader Kieran Shafritz de Zoysa, spending a year in Sri Lanka on leave from the private Sidwell Friends School in Washington, D.C., was among those killed, the school said in an email to parents. The email said, “Kieran was passionate about learning, he adored his friends, and he was incredibly excited” about returning to school.

Dieter Kowalski, who lived in Denver and worked for international education company Pearson, died in the blasts shortly after he arrived at his hotel for a business trip, the company and his family told the AP.

___

DENMARK

The Bestseller clothing chain confirmed Danish media reports that three of the children of its owner, business tycoon Anders Holch Povlsen, were killed in the attacks. However, spokesman Jesper Stubkier gave no details in an emailed response to a query on the matter and said the company had no further comment.

___

SWITZERLAND

Switzerland’s foreign ministry says a Swiss national, a Swiss dual national and a non-Swiss member of the same family were killed in the bombings. It didn’t identify the second country or give other details on the victims.

___

SPAIN

Spain’s foreign ministry says a Spanish man and woman were killed but didn’t provide further details. The mayor of Pontecesures in northwest Spain, Juan Manuel Vidal, told Radio Galega that he knew the local pair and says they were in their 30s, according to a report by the Spanish private news agency Europa Press.

___

AUSTRALIA

Australia’s prime minister says a mother and daughter from that country were killed. Manik Suriaaratchi and her 10-year-old daughter, Alexendria, were attending a church service in Negombo when they died.

___

CHINA

China’s foreign ministry says one Chinese citizen was killed in the blasts, while five are missing. Five others were injured, including two who suffered severe injuries.

___

OTHERS

The Netherlands, Japan and Portugal have confirmed that some of their nationals were among the dead.

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The leading conservative candidate in next month’s European Parliament elections tells The Associated Press that he would like to see Britain stay in the European Union and warned populist parties in Europe that they would have no place in the EU’s largest political bloc unless they shared its vision of an “integrated and more ambitious Europe.”

Manfred Weber, the center-right European People’s Party candidate and front-runner to replace Jean-Claude Juncker as president of the European Commission, visited Greece on Tuesday to launch his campaign for the May 23-26 elections across the EU’s 28 nations.

Weber said he respected the result of Britain’s 2016 referendum to the leave the EU. But he added “I personally would really enjoy and really would welcome if Great Britain would decide to stay.”

Source: Fox News World

A woman has been arrested under the Terrorism Act in connection with the murder of journalist Lyra McKee in Northern Ireland as the paramilitary group responsible for the attack issued a statement apologizing for the slaying.

Authorities in Northern Ireland say the 57-year-old woman was detained on Tuesday. Her identity remains unknown.

McKee, the slain journalist, was killed by gunfire last week during a riot in the city of Londonderry in Northern Ireland.

In this undated family photo made available Friday April 19, 2019, issued by Northern Ireland Police, showing journalist Lyra McKee who was shot and killed when guns were fired during clashes with police Thursday night April 18, 2019, in Londonderry, Northern Ireland. 

In this undated family photo made available Friday April 19, 2019, issued by Northern Ireland Police, showing journalist Lyra McKee who was shot and killed when guns were fired during clashes with police Thursday night April 18, 2019, in Londonderry, Northern Ireland.  (Family photo/PSNI via AP)

JOURNALIST SHOT DEAD IN NORTHERN IRELAND RIOTING, POLICE CALL IT ‘TERRORIST ACT’ BY NEW IRA GROUP

Police called the incident a “terrorist act” and suggested the group calling itself the New IRA, a splinter group of Irish Republican Army, was behind the attack.

“We believe this to be a terrorist act,” Assistant Chief Constable Mark Hamilton said. “We believe it has been carried out by violent dissident republicans.”

Last week, two teenagers were arrested under the anti-terrorism law, but they were shortly released, as authorities continue to scramble to find the exact perpetrators of the murder.

The New IRA admitted Tuesday in a letter that one of their “volunteers” killed the journalist during the riot in the city, according to the Irish News.

GROUP CALLING THEMSELVES THE IRA CLAIMS RESPONSIBILITY FOR LETTER BOMBS IN UK

“The IRA offer our full and sincere apologies to the partner, family and friends of Lyra McKee for her death,” the letter read, which also accused the police of purposely “provoking” the riots.

“The IRA offer our full and sincere apologies to the partner, family and friends of Lyra McKee for her death.”

— The New IRA

“On Thursday night, following an incursion on the Creggan by heavily armed British crown forces which provoked rioting, the IRA deployed our volunteers to engage,” it added.

The letter added that McKee was killed “while standing beside enemy forces,” which refers to police forces. Authorities suspect that it was a stray bullet that hit the woman.

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The New IRA is a small group of republicans who reject the 1998 Good Friday agreement that marked the Irish Republican Army’s embrace of a political solution to the long-running violence known as “The Troubles” that claimed more than 3,700 lives.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump will travel to the U.K. and France in June to mark the anniversary of the D-Day landings, the White House announced Tuesday.

“President Donald J. Trump and First Lady Melania Trump accepted the invitation of Her Royal Majesty Queen Elizabeth II to visit the United Kingdom from June 3 to 5, 2019,” a statement said. “This state visit will reaffirm the steadfast and special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom.

DESPITE ANGER IN LONDON, TRUMP FINDS SUPPORT IN ENGLAND’S PRO-BREXIT WORKING-CLASS TOWNS

Trump will also participate in a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Theresa May and attend a ceremony in Portsmouth to mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day, before traveling to France on June 6, to participate in a ceremony at the Normandy American Cemetery and meet with French President Emmanuel Macron.

Trump has visited both countries before, but Trump’s visit to the U.K. will be part of a state visit — an aspect that was absent when he visited the country last year on a working visit and where he sparked a significant anti-Trump protest in London, as well as a number of smaller pro-Trump rallies.

FRENCH AMBASSADOR BLASTS ‘BIG MOUTH’ TRUMP, SAYS HE READS ‘BASICALLY NOTHING’

Trump has had a somewhat rocky relationship with both May and Macron. While his relationship with May has largely been positive, he has also publicly criticized her handling of Britain’s departure from the European Union.

The relationship with Macron, on the other hand, hit a high last year when the Frenchman visited the White House and was warmly embraced by the president (“He is perfect,” Trump told the press). But it later soured over issues such as Trump’s criticism of French defense spending, tariffs and Trump’s move to begin withdrawing troops from Syria.

After Macron said in November that Europe may have to build its own army to “protect ourselves with respect to China, Russia and even the United States of America,” Trump called the remarks “very insulting” and pointed to the French surrender to Germany in World War II — before hitting Macron’s approval ratings.

“He was just trying to get onto another subject,” he said.

Fox News’ Kristin Brown contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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