Bernie Sanders

Former Vice President Joe Biden leads all Democratic contenders in a poll of Florida voters released Wednesday.

Biden, who announced his run for president in late April, polled at 39 percent, followed by Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Bernie Sanders of Vermont at 12 percent each in the survey from Florida Atlantic University’s (FAU) Business and Economic Polling Initiative.

South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg drew nine percent, Sen. Kamala Harris of California seven percent and former Rep. Beto O’Rourke five percent.

“Even though Joe Biden has a substantial lead among the Democrats, with almost 10 months to go before the Florida Democratic presidential primary, there is still plenty of time for the other candidates to make up ground,” said Monica Escaleras, Ph.D., director of the FAU BEPI.

The survey polled how each of the top five Democrats would do in a matchup with President Donald Trump.

Biden fared best in a 50-50 tie with Trump and Sanders polled at 49 percent to Trump’s 51 percent. Trump won matchups with Warren and Buttigieg, 52-48 percent, while Harris polled six points behind the president, 53-47 percent.  

The survey, conducted May 16-19, polled 1,007 Florida registered voters. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3.0 percentage points. 

Source: NewsMax Politics

Despite the highest ranking for an economy in nearly two decades, only 38 percent of those surveyed approve of the overall job President Donald Trump is doing, while 57 percent disapprove, according to a Quinnipiac University National Poll released on Tuesday.

This compares to 41 percent who approved of Trump in a May 2 poll, while 55 disapproved.

Even though 71 percent rate the economy as either excellent or good, the highest ranking in some 18 years, only 48 percent of voters approve of Trump’s handling of the economy, while 45 percent disapprove.

Other results from the survey show:

  • Fifty-two percent of voters say they are better off financially today than they were in 2016, while 21 percent say they are worse off and 23 percent say they are the same.
  • Only 39 percent approve of the president’s handling of trade, while 43 percent disapprove.
  • Fifty-four percent say they definitely will not vote for Trump, compared to 31 percent who say they definitely will vote for him and 12 percent who will “consider voting for him.”
  • Former Vice President Joe Biden is the only presidential contender of either party with a clear positive score, at 49 percent to 39 percent.
  • The next best score is for Sen. Bernie Sanders, who has a favorability score of 41 percent, while 48 percent view him unfavorably.
  • Biden is the top pick for the party nomination among 35 percent of Democrats or voters leaning Democratic. Sanders has 16 percent, with 13 percent for Sen. Elizabeth Warren, and 8 percent for Sen. Kamala Harris

The poll was conducted from May 16-20 and surveyed 1,078 voters nationwide with a margin of error of 3.7 percentage points, including the design effect.

Source: NewsMax America

U.S. President Donald Trump reacts to supporters after addressing a Trump 2020 re-election campaign rally in Montoursville, Pennsylvania
U.S. President Donald Trump reacts to supporters after addressing a Trump 2020 re-election campaign rally in Montoursville, Pennsylvania, U.S. May 20, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

May 21, 2019

By Steve Holland and Roberta Rampton

WASHINGTON/MONTOURSVILLE, Pa. (Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump, facing a potentially difficult path to winning a second term in November 2020, on Monday told supporters in Pennsylvania that his trade war had strengthened the battleground state’s steel industry and jobs.

Although Trump does not launch his re-election bid officially until next month, his appearance at a raucous rally in an airport hangar in northeastern Pennsylvania, using Air Force One as a backdrop, had the hallmarks of a campaign event.

He took aim at Democratic front-runner and former Vice President Joe Biden. “Sleepy Joe said that he’s running to ‘save the world.’ … He’s going to save every country but ours,” Trump said.

The president previewed the arguments he will make to voters in the 2020 election, crediting his trade stance with helping the U.S. economy.

“When you have the best employment numbers in history, when you have the best unemployment numbers in history, when you have the best economy probably that we’ve ever had, I don’t know – how the hell do you lose this election, right?,” he said.

Trump has waged a high-stakes trade dispute with China, and tariffs imposed by both countries on a range of goods have raised fears of a global economic slowdown.

Trump last year also imposed tariffs on steel and aluminum. He claims that the move saved and created jobs at U.S. mills as well as spurred investment such as by U.S. Steel in Pennsylvania. Many economists say that those benefits are outweighed by higher costs to U.S. companies and consumers.

Trump was stumping for a special House of Representatives election in Pennsylvania, one of three “Rust Belt” states he won in 2016 with votes from white, blue-collar voters who had previously voted Democratic.

His campaign sees the state as key to keeping control of the White House, along with Michigan and Wisconsin. A Quinnipiac University poll last week showed the president trailing the main Democratic contenders in Pennsylvania in particular.

“I’ll be seeing a lot of you over the next year,” Trump said. “Gotta win this state.”

‘TROUBLESOME’ TRIO OF STATES

Trump has already been raising money for his re-election and holding political rallies for many months. But he plans an official rollout for his campaign in mid-June, the four-year anniversary of when he rode the escalator at Trump Tower down to a crowd of supporters and announced his candidacy.

He is likely to hold a rally in Florida, possibly on June 15, to mark the occasion, sources said. The Trump campaign declined to comment.

Trump , who considers Florida to be something of a second home, won the state in 2016. But as is the case for Trump in many battleground states, his victory is not assured there in 2020, and he will likely face a fight to win it again.

The Trump campaign has privately expressed concern about the trio of upper Midwest swing states that provided his 2016 margin of victory, Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

A source close to the campaign called Trump’s position in those states “troublesome.”

“They’re awakening to the fact that they’ve got a problem. They have a solid base among Republicans but a lot of independent voters that gave them the margin in these states are not doing well,” the source said.

‘SLEEPY JOE’

Since Trump took over as president in early 2017, the United States has had low unemployment and strong growth. Typically, presidents with an economy this vibrant would be strong bets for re-election.

But Trump’s polarizing presidency has given hope to a host of Democratic contenders that he can be denied a second term.

Biden has sounded a unifying theme to try to rally Americans behind his candidacy. In second place in the Democratic polls is democratic socialist Bernie Sanders.

Biden has put his campaign headquarters in Philadelphia and has held two rallies in the state during the past month.

Trump has dubbed Biden “Sleepy Joe” to try to undermine him, in much the same way as he gave Republican contender Jeb Bush the nickname “low-energy Jeb” in 2016.

(Reporting By Steve Holland and Roberta Rampton; Additional reporting by Makini Brice and Eric Beech; Editing by Cynthia Osterman)

Source: OANN

A month into former Vice President Joe Biden’s Democratic presidential primary campaign and President Donald Trump already is calling a top challenger “history.”

The slam on Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., a candidate he once praised in 2016 for creating a “movement,” came via Twitter on Monday morning:

“Looks like Bernie Sanders is history. Sleepy Joe Biden is pulling ahead and think about it, I’m only here because of Sleepy Joe and the man who took him off the 1% trash heap, President O! China wants Sleepy Joe BADLY!”

President Trump’s rip into “Sleepy Joe” comes after reports Biden and his son Hunter had ties to business deals with China.

Amid a trade war with China, the world’s second-largest economy and a country with a population almost four times the United States, Trump economic adviser Stephen Moore warned Sunday of the dangers of putting a “China apologist” in the White House.

Still, Biden leads Sen. Sanders by almost 20 percentage points in RealClearPolitics national average of polls. A field of around two dozen Democratic primary candidates are jockeying for position to face off against Biden, former President Barack Obama’s running mate.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Pen of young pigs during a tour of a hog farm in Ryan
A pen of young pigs is seen during a tour of a hog farm in Ryan, Iowa, U.S., May 18, 2019. Picture taken May 18, 2019. REUTERS/Ben Brewer

May 20, 2019

By Tom Polansek

DUBUQUE, Iowa (Reuters) – Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg asked a crowd of hot and sticky supporters packed into an Iowa brewery this weekend whether the United States has a plan to win the ongoing trade war with China.

“Nooo,” was the response.

The world’s two largest economies have been embroiled in a 10-month trade war that has roiled global supply chains and rattled financial markets. U.S. farmers, who helped carry Trump to his surprise 2016 election win, have been among the hardest hit as China has imposed tariffs on imports of U.S. agricultural products including soybeans, pork and grain sorghum in response to U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods.

Now, increasing frustrations over the prolonged dispute are prompting some rural residents in Iowa, home of the first presidential nominating contest in February, to consider candidates other than President Donald Trump in the 2020 election.

Their desire for alternatives highlights the deep financial pain the trade war is causing in the agriculture sector, a backbone of Iowa’s economy. Farm incomes have also suffered from years of overproduction and low commodity prices.

Virgil Murray of Bellevue, Iowa, a city of about 2,000 people, voted for Trump and considers himself a Republican. But the 72-year-old retired school superintendent attended the rally for Buttigieg in Dubuque on Saturday with his wife, a Democrat. Murray said he is open to voting for a Democratic candidate.

“A lot of the farmers voted for Trump. Now they’re feeling it,” said Murray, who lives near the Mississippi River, a key pipeline for moving grain from Midwest farms to export terminals along the Gulf Coast.

Trump has pledged to help farmers with direct payments and says the China trade war will benefit them in the long run.

Other Democratic candidates including Joe Biden, who leads primary polls, have also criticized Trump’s trade policies.

Farmers worry that a deal to end the trade war would take much longer than expected after Trump on May 9 increased tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese imports. China quickly raised tariffs on $60 billion of U.S. goods in response.

The Trump administration wants any trade deal with China to include purchases of more than $1.2 trillion worth of American products, including agricultural commodities.

The countries appeared on track for an agreement before relations soured this month, pushing U.S. soybean futures to their lowest prices in more than a decade.

“We were optimistic. That blew up,” Ken Ries, a farmer who raises soybeans, corn and hogs, said in an interview at his home in Ryan, Iowa.

SOY FARMERS SUCKING AIR

Ries, 69, voted for Trump in 2016 and said he will not vote for a Democrat in 2020 but would consider a candidate other than Trump if there is a Republican primary.

“The soybean farmer is sucking air,” Ries said.

Some farmers are wary of Democrats who have expressed opposition to “Big Ag” and support for the Green New Deal, a proposal that aims to cut carbon emissions in agriculture and other parts of the economy, said Kirk Leeds, chief executive of the Iowa Soybean Association.

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, another Democratic presidential contender, has advocated breaking up large agribusinesses that dominate dealings in the meat and grain sectors.

“I think you’re going to see the support for the president stay pretty solid, based on no clear alternative,” Leeds said.

But some farmers who are unhappy with Trump and dislike Democrats could not vote at all during the next election, Leeds said.

$20 BILLION IN AID

The U.S. Department of Agriculture is preparing a second package of aid for farmers hurt by the trade war of up to $20 billion. The agency in 2018 pledged up to $12 billion, most of it in direct payments to farmers to help offset their crop losses. It has allocated about $9.4 billion of that so far.

Charmayne McMurray, who raised crops and livestock for more than a quarter century in Andrew, Iowa, said the payouts will not stop farmers from considering Democratic candidates.

“Farmers, they want to work. They don’t want a handout” said McMurray, a 73-year-old undecided Democrat who now lives in Dubuque and was among about 550 people at Buttigieg’s rally there.

Dubuque County flipped from supporting Democrat Barack Obama in 2012 to Trump in 2016.

Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, said Trump launched the trade war without a strategy of how to win it. The dispute is just one problem that could prompt farmers to consider Democratic candidates in 2020, he said.

Other threats include consolidation among commodity buyers and changes in climate that are making it more difficult to produce crops, Buttigieg told reporters.

“I’ve certainly talked to a lot of farmers who are getting killed and in a lot of different ways,” he said. “All of these things I think are a good moment for Democrats to remind rural America why we have a better message for them than the current president, who I think has been taking them for granted.”

(Reporting by Tom Polansek; Editing by Caroline Stauffer and Chris Reese)

Source: OANN

President Donald Trump slammed Fox News and host Chris Wallace on Sunday for “moving more and more to the losing (wrong) side in covering” the Democrats.

The news outlet hosted a town hall with 2020 candidate Pete Buttigieg on Sunday night.

“Hard to believe that @FoxNews is wasting airtime on Mayor Pete, as Chris Wallace likes to call him. Fox is moving more and more to the losing (wrong) side in covering the Dems,” Trump tweeted. “They got dumped from the Democrats boring debates, and they just want in. They forgot the people who got them here.

“Chris Wallace said, “I actually think, whether you like his opinions or not, that Mayor Pete has a lot of substance…fascinating biography,”” he added. “Gee, he never speaks well of me – I like Mike Wallace better…and Alfred E. Newman will never be President!”

Veteran CBS newsmax Mike Wallace was Chris Wallace’s father. Alfred E. Newman, the mascot of Mad magazine, is Trump’s nickname for Buttigieg.

Trump throughout his presidency has consistently praised Fox News and criticized coverage by “fake news” media, including The New York Times, Washington Post and CNN, among others.

Trump took similar shots at Fox in April over its town hall with Sen. Bernie Sanders, another 2020 Democratic hopeful.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., said Sunday it’s not “good enough” for Democrats to nominate a candidate just to defeat President Donald Trump, arguing his presidential campaign aims “to transform this country.”

In an interview on NBC News’ “Meet The Press,” Sanders emphasized the differences in his approach compared with current front-runner primary candidate Joe Biden.

“Beating Trump is not good enough,” Sanders said. “You have to beat the fossil fuel industry, you have to take on all the forces of the status quo who do not want to move this country to energy efficiency and sustainable energy.” 

“Taking on Trump? Of course you’ve got to do that,” he said. “But you need a real plan to transform our energy system.”

According to Sanders, his campaign is “going to create the kind of excitement that we need to bring out the large voter turnout… The truth is that our campaign, I think, can generate that excitement.”

He added that his 2016 run against Hillary Clinton proved he could take on the Democratic Party establishment.

“We took on the entire Democratic establishment — we took on the Democratic National Committee, we took on every Democratic governor, we took on every Democratic mayor, and we ended up winning 22 states and 13 million votes, and in fact bringing forth an agenda that transformed the Democratic party,” he declared.

Source: NewsMax Politics

In preparation for the big dollar presidential campaign spending of television ads, Democrats have picked up the pace of online ads on Google and Facebook, reversing what was a 2-1 spending edge by President Donald Trump as recently as March, Axios reported Sunday.

Since the start of 2019, Democrats have spent a combined $12.7 on those ads, while the Trump campaign as spent $7.9 million, according to the report.

Now, that does include a field of about two dozen Democrats and just one U.S. president, but former Vice President Joe Biden just officially announced his candidacy last month and has recently surpassed President Trump in online advertising, according to Bully Pulpit Interactive.

Since unveiling his Democratic primary intentions, Biden has outspent President Trump $1.5 million to $969K – $960.8K to $623.2K on Facebook and $541.6K to $346.6K on Google. South Bend, Indiana Mayor Peter Buttigieg ($387.9K) has also outspent President Trump on Google.

Adapted from Advertising Analytics; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

According to Axios, the early campaign spending online helps optimize campaigns and coordinate where the big dollars go later in the 2020 presidential campaigns. They do so by taking individual donations, collect campaign data, and build up lists.

The spending by Democrats does not mirror currently polling numbers, according to RealClearPolitics polling averages.

The top five in the polls:

  1. Biden.
  2. Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.
  3. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.
  4. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.
  5. Buttigieg.

The top five Democrats in online ad spending since April 20, per Bully Pulpit:

  1. Biden.
  2. Harris.
  3. Buttigieg.
  4. Warren.
  5. Entrepreneur Andrew Yang of New York.

Sen. Sanders is seventh among Democrats in online ad spend, also surpassed by Gov. Jay Inslee, D-Wash.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Democratic presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders unveiled an education policy proposal on Saturday designed to pump billions of dollars into the public schools system, in a bid to appeal to black voters who shunned the U.S. senator during his previous presidential run.

The 10-point plan Sanders detailed in a speech in South Carolina aims to end racial disparities in the public education system. America’s education policy debate has long been steeped in discussions of race and racial discrimination.

Sanders struggled in the 2016 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination against Hillary Clinton to garner support among African-Americans. His chief Democratic rival in the run-up to the 2020 election, former Vice President Joe Biden, has polled well among black voters.

“Every child has a right to a quality K-12 education, regardless of your race, regardless of your income, and regardless of your zip code,” Sanders said in a statement on the proposal.

The Vermont senator built his 2016 campaign on a series of liberal policy ideas that at the time made him unique among Democrats, but which now are shared by many of his rivals. More than 20 Democrats are vying to challenge President Donald Trump, the likely Republican nominee.

Sanders has struggled to distinguish himself in the current field, frequently complaining that he deserves credit for pioneering many of the progressive ideas now espoused by other Democratic challengers.

Sanders titled his new education proposal the “Thurgood Marshall Plan for Education,” a nod to the Supreme Court justice who before being on the bench successfully argued the 1954 landmark Brown v. Board of Education case that desegregated public schools.

On Friday, the Sanders campaign previewed the portion of the proposal that would overhaul charter schools, the publicly-funded schools that operate independently of government oversight.

The remaining portion of his proposal covers everything from teacher pay to school lunches.

Sanders said he would push for funding to better integrate some schools. He also called for a federal funding minimum and moving away from using property taxes to pay for schools. Critics argue that using property taxes results in wealthy areas having better schools than more impoverished neighborhoods.

He wants to spend an additional $5 billion a year on summer school and after-school programs across the United States and also called for an increase in federal funding for programs for students with disabilities.

Teachers’ salaries should be set at a minimum of $60,000 a year, Sanders said, and tied to regional cost of living. Schools should be required to provide free meals, breakfast, lunch and snacks to all students, he said.

He added that he wants to provide another $5 billion to increase community services at schools, including health and dental care, mental health and job training.

For schools that continue to lack the infrastructure necessary to teach students, Sanders wants to provide federal funds for more school construction.

The senator also proposed making schools safer and more inclusive, including by passing gun control legislation and enacting laws to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer students.

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: U.S. 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders participates in a moderated discussion at the We the People Summit in Washington
FILE PHOTO: U.S. 2020 Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders participates in a moderated discussion at the We the People Summit in Washington, U.S., April 1, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria/File Photo

May 18, 2019

By Ginger Gibson

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Democratic U.S. presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders on Saturday announced an education policy proposal designed to pump billions of dollars into the public schools system in a direct appeal to black voters who shunned the U.S. senator in his previous presidential bid.

The 10-point plan Sanders will detail in a speech in South Carolina is designed to end racial disparities in the public education system. America’s education policy debate has long been steeped in discussions of race and racial discrimination.

Sanders struggled in the 2016 campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination against Hillary Clinton to garner support among African-Americans. His chief Democratic rival in the run-up to the 2020 election, former Vice President Joe Biden, has polled well among black voters.

“Every child has a right to a quality K-12 education, regardless of your race, regardless of your income, and regardless of your zip code,” Sanders said in a statement on the proposal.

Sanders built his 2016 campaign on a series of liberal policy ideas that at the time made him unique among Democrats, but now are shared by many of his rivals. More than 20 Democrats are vying to challenge President Donald Trump, the likely Republican nominee.

Sanders has struggled to distinguish himself in the current field, frequently complaining that he deserves credit for everyone else’s agreement with him.

The senator from Vermont titled his new education proposal the “Thurgood Marshall Plan for Education,” a nod to the Supreme Court justice who before being on the bench successfully argued the landmark Brown v. Board of Education case of 1954 that desegregated public schools.

On Friday, the Sanders campaign previewed the portion of the proposal that would overhaul charter schools, the publicly-funded schools that operate independently of government oversight.

The remaining portion of his proposal covers everything from teacher pay to school lunches.

Sanders said he would push for funding to better integrate some schools. He also called for a federal funding minimum and getting away from using property taxes to pay for schools. Critics argue that using property taxes results in wealthy areas having better schools than more impoverished neighborhoods.

He wants to spend an additional $5 billion a year on summer school and after school programs across the United States.

Sanders also called for an increase in federal funding for programs for students with disabilities.

Teacher salary should be set at a minimum of $60,000 a year, Sanders said, and tied to regional cost of living.

He wants to require schools to provide free meals, breakfast, lunch and snacks, to all students.

He wants to provide another $5 billion to increase community services at schools, including health and dental care, mental health and job training.

For schools that continue to lack the infrastructure necessary to teach students, Sanders wants to provide federal funds for more school construction.

And finally, Sanders proposed making schools safer and more inclusive, including passing gun control legislations and enacting laws to protect lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (LGBTQ) students.

(Reporting by Ginger Gibson; editing by Grant McCool)

Source: OANN


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