Beto

Former Vice President Joe Biden hours ahead of launching his presidential campaign urged top donors and supporters to contribute heavily in the first 24 hours and first week following his announcement.

Biden said world leaders had called him, “almost begging me to do this, to save our country, save the world,” according to three sources who spoke with Politico.

“The money’s important. We’re going to be judged by what we can do in the first 24 hours, the first week,” Biden said Wednesday during a conference call with top donors and supporters.

“People think Iowa and New Hampshire are the first test,” Biden said. “It’s not. The first 24 hours. That’s the first test. Those [early states] are way down the road. We’ve got to get through this first.”

Per The Washington Post, Biden, 76, is set to announce his run for president Thursday in a video. He is expected to travel to Pittsburgh, Iowa, New Hampshire, and South Carolina over the next week for campaign events.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., topped Democrats in the fundraising race in the first quarter, bringing in $18.2 million, followed by Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. (nearly $12 million), former Texas Congressman Beto O’Rourke ($9.4 million) and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg (nearly $7 million).

Source: NewsMax America

FILE PHOTO: Former Vice President Biden speaks to reporters after speaking at electrical workers’ conference in Washington
FILE PHOTO: Former Vice President Joe Biden who is mulling a 2020 presidential candidacy, speaks to the media after speaking at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers’ (IBEW) construction and maintenance conference in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts/File Photo

April 24, 2019

By Chris Kahn

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Former Vice President Joe Biden, expected to declare his run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday, leads all other candidates in the race and draws his strongest levels of support from minorities and older adults, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos public opinion poll.

The April 17-23 poll released on Wednesday focused on the vote preferences of 2,237 Democrats and independents: the two groups that may select the Democratic nominee in most of the statewide contests ahead of the 2020 general election.

(Graphic: Who is running in 2020 – https://graphics.reuters.com/USA-ELECTION/010091471JC/index.html)

According to the poll, 24 percent would vote for Biden over 19 other declared and potential candidates.

Another 15 percent said they would support U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who ran a competitive campaign for the Democratic nomination in 2016.

No other candidate received more than 7 percent of public support, and 21 percent said they “don’t know” which candidate they would back in a primary.

The poll measures how potential voters feel right now. Many may change their minds as they become better acquainted with the candidates. It has a credibility interval, a measure of precision, of 2 percentage points for the combined group of Democrats and independents.

The statewide nominating contests will kick off in early February next year, led by Iowa.

Biden, 76, who has sought the Democratic presidential nomination twice before, remains widely popular since he left the White House in 2016 after two terms as vice president. The former longtime U.S. senator will announce he is seeking the Democratic nomination https://reut.rs/2IAxNys on Thursday, a source familiar with the plans said on Tuesday.

Sixty-three percent of all Americans say they have a “favorable” impression of Biden, including 88 percent of Democrats, 59 percent of independents and 39 percent of Republicans.

In comparison, 58 percent of Americans said they have a favorable view of Sanders and Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, whose upstart campaign has out-raised some of his more established rivals this year.

All three appear to have stronger bipartisan appeal than Republican President Donald Trump. According to the poll, 44 percent of all adults said they have a generally favorable view of Trump.

Biden receives his strongest levels of support from older adults and minorities.

Thirty-two percent of adults who are 55 years old and older said they would vote for Biden over other candidates. And 30 percent of nonwhite adults, including about 4 in 10 African-Americans, said they would back Biden for the nomination.

The poll shows that at this early stage of the presidential campaign, Americans say they will vote for candidates who have been in the national spotlight for a long time.

Their preferences may change once they get to know other candidates for the Democratic nomination.

More than 80 percent of Democrats said they were at least “somewhat familiar” with Biden and Sanders.

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats were familiar with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and about half said they were familiar with former U.S. Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas or U.S. Senators Kamala Harris of California and Cory Booker of New Jersey.

The rest of the field appears to be largely unknown by a majority of Democrats.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English throughout the United States. It gathered responses from 4,018 adults in all, including 1,449 Democrats, 1,437 Republicans and 788 independents.

(To see the poll question and answers, please see: https://tmsnrt.rs/2W7qykY.)

(Reporting by Chris Kahn; Editing by Leslie Adler and Jonathan Oatis)

Source: OANN

Former Vice President Joe Biden leads all other candidates for the 2020 Democrat presidential nomination and draws his strongest levels of support from minorities and older adults, according to a Reuters/Ipsos public poll released on Wednesday.

The April 17-23 poll focused on the vote preferences of 2,237 Democrats and independents – the two groups that may select the Democratic nominee in most of the statewide contests ahead of the 2020 general election.

According to the poll, 24 percent would vote for Biden over 19 other declared and potential candidates.

Another 15 percent said they would support U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who ran a competitive campaign for the Democrat nomination in 2016.

No other candidate received more than 7 percent of public support, and 21 percent said they “don’t know” which candidate they would back in a primary.

The poll measures how potential voters feel right now. Many may change their minds as they become better acquainted with the candidates. It has a credibility interval, a measure of precision, of 2 percentage points for the combined group of Democrats and independents.

The statewide nominating contests will kick off in early February next year, led by Iowa.

Biden, 76, who has sought the Democrat presidential nomination twice before and is expected to announce a third run later this week, remains widely popular since he left the White House in 2016 after two terms as vice president.

Sixty-three percent of all Americans say they have a “favorable” impression of Biden, including 88 percent of Democrats, 59 percent of independents and 39 percent of Republicans.

In comparison, 58 percent of Americans said they have a favorable view of Sanders and Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, whose upstart campaign has out-raised some of his more established rivals this year.

All three appear to have stronger bi-partisan appeal than President Donald Trump. According to the poll, 44 percent of all adults said they have a generally favorable view of Trump.

Biden receives his strongest levels of support from older adults and minorities.

Thirty-two percent of adults who are 55 years old and older said they would vote for Biden over other candidates. And 30 percent of non-white adults, including about 4 in 10 African-Americans, said they would back Biden for the nomination.

The poll shows that at this early stage of the presidential campaign, Americans say they will vote for candidates who have been in the national spotlight for a long time.

Their preferences may change once they get to know other candidates for the nomination.

More than 80 percent of Democrats said they were at least “somewhat familiar” with Biden and Sanders.

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats were familiar with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and about half said they were familiar with former U.S. Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas or U.S. Senators Kamala Harris of California and Cory Booker of New Jersey.

The rest of the field appears to be largely unknown by a majority of Democrats.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English throughout the United States. It gathered responses from 4,018 adults in all, including 1,449 Democrats, 1,437 Republicans and 788 independents.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Establishment Republicans could not do it, neither could Hillary Clinton, media resistance, nor special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation.

Now, Democrats are desperately sorting out which primary candidate will be the best to beat President Donald Trump, The Hill reported, citing pollsters.

“[Democratic voters are] hungry for a candidate to take on President Donald Trump,” Quinnipiac University pollster Tim Malloy said, per the report, explaining how former Vice President Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., and ex-Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, are the leading candidates atop the poll right now.

“[Biden’s] advantage is he’s rooted in experience, was vice president to [Barack] Obama, appeals to blue collar voters,” pollster Celinda Lake told The Hill. “Voters will have it on their minds.”

“Electability” (56%) almost doubled up “echoed beliefs” (33%) in their preferred trait of their Democratic candidate in a February Monmouth University poll.

It is electability that justifies Democrats leading with three white men in a diverse field of presidential candidates. Age, race, and gender “take a back seat” to electability, according to the Quinnipiac poll.

Polling is being “driven by this intense dislike of Trump,” Lake told The Hill.

“Electability seems to be Democrats greatest concern, so even if many of those touting white male candidates have no problem themselves with voting for a woman, they are worried that their friends and neighbors do have such hesitations,” Ohio University professor Katherine Jellison, a scholar of women’s studies, told The Hill. “Under those circumstances, they see a white male candidate as the best bet to defeat Donald Trump.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former San Antonio, Texas Mayor Julian Castro is among the top five Democratic presidential contenders favored by Hispanic voters, a new poll reveals.

The survey was conducted by the polling firm Latino Decision and the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials. The results were detailed in a story by The Hill.

Here are the top five Democrats favored by Hispanic voters, according to the poll:

  • 59% favor former Vice President Joe Biden
  • 58% favor Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.
  • 48% favor former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke
  • 45% favor Castro
  • 43% favor Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif.

The Hill noted Castro is the only Hispanic currently running for president.

The poll, conducted April 9-15, surveyed 606 Latino registered voters. The margin of error is 3.9 percentage points.

Source: NewsMax Politics

South Bend, Ind., mayor and Democratic presidential contender Pete Buttigieg is in talks with Fox News about appearing in a town hall event, The Hill reported Tuesday.

An unnamed spokesperson for Buttigieg told the news outlet “reaching out to the Fox audience is something we intend to do.”

The intention was announced a day after Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., became the first 2020 Democratic candidate to go onto Fox for a town hall event. Democratic National Committee chairman Tom Perez announced ast month Fox would be barred from hosting any of the party’s primary debates. 

Buttigieg has been gaining attention in his long-shot bid; an Emerson College poll released Monday showed Sanders at 29% among Democratic respondents, former Vice President Joe Biden at 24%, Buttigieg third with 9%, Sen. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., former Democratic Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke each with 8%, and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., at 7%.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Former Rep. Beto O’Rourke, D-Texas, released 10 years of his tax returns Monday, reporting $366,455 in adjusted gross income in 2017 for him and his wife, Amy.

O’Rourke, who is running for president in 2020, joined a growing list of Democratic presidential contenders to put their personal finances on display.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., released his returns earlier Monday, and Sens. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., did so previously.

O’Rourke, who lost a tight race against Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, last November, paid $81,019 in federal income tax in 2017, and donated just $1,166 to charity.

The campaign said O’Rourke will release his 2018 returns “as soon as possible as they are filed,” adding the decision to release them “follows his commitment to increasing accountability and transparency while in the House of Representatives when he held monthly public town halls back in his district where any person could ask any question.”

The returns show an income of more than $330,000 in 2014 and 2016 and more than $370,000 in 2017 and 2015.

President Donald Trump has yet to publicly disclose his returns, though the House Ways and Means Committee has requested six years of personal and business returns.

Source: NewsMax Politics

President Donald Trump’s re-election campaign is set to report that it raised more than $30 million in the first quarter of 2019, edging out his top two Democratic rivals combined, according to figures it provided to The Associated Press.

The haul brings the campaign’s cash on hand to $40.8 million, an unprecedented war chest for an incumbent president this early in a campaign.

The Trump campaign said nearly 99% of its donations were of $200 or less, with an average donation of $34.26.

Trump’s fundraising ability was matched by the Republican National Committee, which brought in $45.8 million in the first quarter — its best non-election year total. Combined, the pro-Trump effort is reporting $82 million in the bank, with $40.8 million belonging to the campaign alone.

Trump formally launched his reelection effort just hours after taking office in 2017, earlier than any incumbent has in prior years. By contrast, former President Barack Obama launched his 2012 effort in April 2011 and had under $2 million on hand at this point in the campaign.

Obama went on to raise more than $720 million for his reelection. Trump’s reelection effort has set a $1 billion target for 2020.

Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale said in a statement that Trump “is in a vastly stronger position at this point than any previous incumbent president running for re-election, and only continues to build momentum.”

Trump’s fundraising with the RNC is divided between two entities: Trump Victory, the joint account used for high-dollar gifts, and the Trump Make America Great Again Committee, the low-dollar digital fundraising operation known internally as “T-Magic.” The campaign is set to launch a traditional “bundling” program — which it lacked in 2016 — in the coming weeks. Bundlers are mid-tier donors who bring in contributions from their associates.

Together, the Trump entities have raised a combined $165.5 million since 2017.

Trump is benefiting from the advantages of incumbency, like universal name recognition and his unrivaled position atop the Republican Party.

Among Democrats, dollars are divided across a candidate field of well more than a dozen, while the Democratic National Committee remains in debt and has suffered from being dramatically outraised by the RNC in recent months.

Bernie Sanders topped the Democratic field in the first quarter, raising slightly more than $18 million, followed by Kamala Harris with $12 million and Beto O’Rourke with $9.4 million. Trump is reporting a haul of $30.3 million.

Republicans have trailed Democrats in online fundraising ever since the medium was invented roughly two decades ago. But Trump has closed the gap, driving small-dollar donors who make recurring donations to the GOP like the party has never seen before. According to RNC chairwoman Ronna McDaniel, Trump’s campaign has already had eight seven-figure fundraising days this year, and has taken in money from more than 1 million new online donors since Trump’s inauguration — including 100,000 this year.

The Republican committee said it is planning on spending $30 million on maintaining and growing Trump’s email list alone, recently expanded its headquarters space to an annex in Virginia and will soon invest in developing an app.

In 2015, Trump swore off outside money, declaring in his opening speech: “I’m using my own money. I’m not using the lobbyists’. I’m not using donors’. I don’t care. I’m really rich.”

He quickly reversed course on high-dollar donations after he won the GOP nomination, bowing to the financial pressures of running a general election campaign, and he’d already raised millions online through the sale of merchandise like his signature red Make America Great Again hats.

Trump gave or loaned $66 million to his 2016 campaign, but has yet to spend any of his own cash for his reelection effort. Aides don’t expect that to change.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., is developing a risky strategy of reaching out to President Donald Trump voters, stumping last week in Wisconsin and Michigan — and appearing on a Fox News-sponsored town hall Monday,  The Washington Post reported.

The approach will be tested not only in Wisconsin and Michigan, but Pennsylvania, too — all part of his current campaign swing, where many white, working-class voters were drawn to Trump’s populist message in 2016. 

Yet many of the Democratic gains in the 2018 election were made by candidates who were in a more traditional Democrat mold — including in Wisconsin and Michigan, where Democrats nominated more traditional candidates for governor and captured both seats from Republicans.

According to the Post, Sanders’ approach also will be tested with the the expected candidacy of former vice president Joe Biden. Biden’s bipartisan approach would sharpen the contrast between the field’s “unifiers” — Biden, Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., and former Texas Democratic Rep. Beto O’Rourke — and partisans like Sanders and Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

Sanders’s supporters say voters are deeply frustrated and looking for a leader who will shake things up, noting 11 percent of voters who picked Sanders in the 2016 Democratic primary went on to vote for Trump in the general election, the Post reported, citing an American National Election Studies survey. Another 8 percent voted for minor-party candidates, and Sanders loyalists think he’s got a shot at them as well.

“Unfortunately, a lot of times people are really angry, and sometimes they displace that anger,” Sanders supporter Christina Fong, of Grand Rapids, Mich., told the Post. “So they remain angry, which he taps into.”

Others think Sanders’ message is too extreme.

“I think when people find out that certain candidates want to take away people’s employer-sponsored health care, that’s going to be very worrisome for some Democrats, especially in some of these affluent suburbs,” Ian Russell, former executive director of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, told the Post.

Republicans, meanwhile, are ready for a run against Sanders.

“Speaking for North Carolina, if America had a choice between a self-avowed socialist democrat and a free market capitalist, he loses,” Sen. Thom Tillis, R-N.C., told the Post. “Period, end of story.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Senator Harris launches her campaign for U.S. president at a rally in Oakland
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Senator Kamala Harris launches her campaign for president of the United States at a rally at Frank H. Ogawa Plaza in her hometown of Oakland, California, U.S., January 27, 2019. REUTERS/Elijah Nouvelage/File Photo

April 12, 2019

By Amanda Becker

IOWA CITY, Iowa (Reuters) – U.S. Senator Kamala Harris held just one public event this week during her third trip to Iowa since joining the contest for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination, a town hall at the University of Iowa where she talked about her plan to raise teacher pay.

Harris, formerly California’s top prosecutor, spent most of her two-day visit at private gatherings aimed at securing early support from specific constituencies – women, state lawmakers and educators.

Iowa hosts the first presidential nominating contest in February 2020, and Harris’ early strategy in the farming state is considerably different than the traditional barnstorm politicking by some of her Democratic competitors.

Former Texas congressman Beto O’Rourke, for example, went to 23 events across 10 counties on his second trip to Iowa. U.S. Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey attended 14 events in 11 counties during two visits, with a third scheduled next week.

Harris’ campaign thinks its targeted approach will allow her to build momentum in Iowa, while freeing up resources to invest more heavily in the path they see as crucial to her winning the Democratic nomination: California and the U.S. South.

“Organizing looks very different right now than it will look a year or even six months from now,” said Miryam Lipper, Harris’ Iowa spokeswoman. “Right now we’re focused on introducing Kamala to Iowans and engaging with potential supporters in a smart way.”

Harris’ tactics carry some risk. Iowa voters play an outsized role in picking U.S. presidents, and many have come to expect frequent face time with White House hopefuls.

Harris aides say it is early in the race, and there could come a point when she crisscrosses Iowa’s 99 counties.

However, Iowa likely will award just 41 of about 3,800 delegates available to win the Democratic nomination. While the campaign aims to do well there, aides say they do not think a first-place finish is as critical for Harris as it might be for other candidates needing a break-out moment.

Early opinion polls show Harris in the top tier of more than 18 Democrats who have announced campaigns or are expected to. Harris, 54, supports a middle-class tax credit, Medicare for All government health insurance, the so-called Green New Deal proposal on climate change and the legalization of marijuana.

Joshua Putnam, a professor at the University of North Carolina Wilmington who specializes in political primaries, said a candidate in Harris’ position needs to meet expectations in Iowa and the subsequent New Hampshire primary to remain viable for the strategy to work.

“They likely do not need outright wins in either of the first two states, but that is not the only type of winning. One can win or lose relative to expectations as well,” Putnam said.

GRAPHIC-Who is running in 2020 – https://tmsnrt.rs/2Ff62ZC

‘CAMP KAMALA’

Harris’ strategy was on display this week as she courted groups with the potential to influence their friends and neighbors.

She met with Democratic state legislators on Thursday ahead of their session ending in May, when they will leave Des Moines and return to their districts. She secured her first endorsement from a party activist in Iowa before a house party hosted by members of a group that encourages women to run for office.

Harris told the women the 2016 election of President Donald Trump, the likely Republican candidate in 2020, was an “inflection point” in U.S. history. 

“This is a moment in time that is requiring each of us as individuals and collectively to look in the mirror and ask a question … who are we?” Harris said at the gathering. “And part of the answer to that question is we are better than this. So this is a moment in time then that we must fight for the best of who we are.”

Next week, Harris’ campaign is hosting “Camp Kamala” to educate college students about Iowa’s complex caucus process and her candidacy before they fan out across the state and the rest of the country for their summer break.

While she is not ceding Iowa by any stretch, Harris’ delegate strategy begins in earnest in Nevada and South Carolina, which hold the third and fourth nominating contests.

Harris aides say they expect to do well in Nevada and believe it is important to have a strong showing or win in South Carolina, the first contest with a sizeable percentage of black voters. Harris, the daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and India, would make history as the first black woman to gain the nomination.

Her performance on so-called “Super Tuesday” in early March, when at least a dozen states will award about 40 percent of the delegates, will be critical, her campaign acknowledged.

The southern states of Alabama, Arkansas, North Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia hold their nominating contests on Super Tuesday, as do delegate-rich Texas and California. Harris has already visited Texas, which will award more than 260 delegates, and California, where she has won statewide races three times, will award at least 475.

Her campaign aims to invest as heavily in these states as they can, aides said.

Jean Hessburg, the Iowa activist who endorsed Harris this week, said caucus goers understand “this is a marathon and not a sprint.” Candidates making dozens of stops across the state risk spreading themselves too thin, she added.

“By doing these targeted events, the idea would be it’s more memorable,” said Hessburg, who leads the Women’s Caucus for the Iowa Democratic Party.

(Reporting by Amanda Becker; additional reporting by Joseph Ax and Timothy Reid; Editing by Colleen Jenkins and Grant McCool)

Source: OANN


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