election

America has to fix the attack by Russia on the 2016 election, but it’s a “false choice” to conclude impeachment is the only solution, according to Hillary Clinton.

In a commentary posted by The Washington Post, the 2016 Democratic presidential nominee said “this is bigger than politics.”

“A crime was committed against all Americans, and all Americans should demand action and accountability,” she wrote.

“Our founders envisioned the danger we face today and designed a system to meet it. Now it’s up to us to prove the wisdom of our Constitution, the resilience of our democracy and the strength of our nation.”

According to Clinton, Congress has to “get it right.”

Mueller’s report “is a road map,” she wrote, but asserted the debate about how to respond and “how to hold President [Donald] Trump accountable for obstructing the investigation and possibly breaking the law …has been reduced to a false choice: immediate impeachment or nothing.”

“What our country needs now is clear-eyed patriotism, not reflexive partisanship,” she wrote.

“It’s up to members of both parties to see where that road map leads — to the eventual filing of articles of impeachment, or not,” she wrote. “Either way, the nation’s interests will be best served by putting party and political considerations aside and being deliberate, fair and fearless.”

Secondly, she said Congress has to hold “substantive hearings that build on the Mueller report and fill in its gaps” before heading right for impeachment — and asserted “Watergate offers a better precedent” with its televised hearings.

“Similar hearings with Mueller, former White House counsel Donald McGahn and other key witnesses could do the same today.”

Also, she said, the nation needs a commission like the one formed after 9/11 to be established by Congress “to recommend steps that would help guard against future attacks.”

Clinton also warned Democrats that they will have to “stay focused on the sensible agenda that voters demanded in the midterms, from protecting health care to investing in infrastructure.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

The family of the late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., will back former Vice President Joe Biden for president, the Washington Examiner is reporting.

The McCain family intends to support Biden through the Democratic primaries, the Examiner reported. The McCains also would throw their support behind him in a race against President Donald Trump in the general election, should Biden make it.

Sources tell the Examiner, McCain’s widow, Cindy, and daughter Meghan, 34, will publicly offer their support in an attempt to get Trump out of office in 2020.

A McCain family source said there have been talks with the McCains and Biden family about his 2020 run.

“The question is going to be timing and coordinating with the Biden campaign,” the source said. “There are a lot of moving parts there and (Biden’s campaign is) not necessarily organized. I wouldn’t expect a formal family endorsement because some of McCain’s family is still in the military, but I do expect Cindy to speak out at some point.”

The senator died last August after a battle with brain cancer. He and Trump had been locked in a feud during the 2016 campaign. And in 2017, McCain cast the deciding vote that end the GOP’s effort to repeal Obamacare. Trump has remained critical of McCain since the senator’s death.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Trumps depart the White House in Washington
U.S. President Donald Trump and first lady Melania Trump depart the White House in Washington, U.S., April 24, 2019. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

April 24, 2019

By Susan Heavey

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – President Donald Trump vowed on Wednesday to fight all the way to the Supreme Court against any effort by congressional Democrats to impeach him, even though the U.S. Constitution gives Congress complete authority over the impeachment process.

Trump’s threat, made in a morning tweet, came as the White House launched a fierce legal battle to fight subpoenas from Democrats in the House of Representatives for documents and testimony from his administration.

Democrats remain divided on whether to proceed with Trump’s impeachment after Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia inquiry. Trump defiantly proclaimed on Twitter that the investigation “didn’t lay a glove on me.”

“If the partisan Dems ever tried to Impeach, I would first head to the U.S. Supreme Court,” the Republican president, who is seeking re-election next year, said without offering details about what legal action he envisioned.

The Constitution gives the sole power of impeachment and removing a president from office to the House and the Senate, not the judiciary, as part of the founding document’s separation of powers among the three branches of the federal government.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and other Democratic leaders have remained cautious over launching impeachment proceedings against Trump ahead of the 2020 election, although they have left the door open to such action. Others in the party’s more liberal wing have demanded impeachment proceedings.

Mueller’s findings, released in a redacted report last week, detailed about a dozen episodes of potential obstruction of justice by Trump in trying to impede the inquiry but stopped short of concluding that he had committed a crime.

The report said Congress could address whether the president violated the law. Mueller separately found insufficient evidence that Trump’s campaign engaged in a criminal conspiracy with Russia in the 2016 presidential race.

House Democrats have stepped up their oversight of the Trump administration since taking control of the chamber in January, from Trump’s tax returns and White House security clearances to the investigation into Russian interference in U.S. politics.

Trump has ordered officials not to comply with subpoenas, and has filed a lawsuit to prevent material from being turned over to lawmakers.

“We’re fighting all the subpoenas,” Trump told reporters at the White House on Wednesday.

CONSTITUTION

Under the Constitution, Congress is a co-equal branch of government alongside the executive branch and the judiciary.

The Constitution empowers Congress to remove a president from office for “treason, bribery or other high crimes and misdemeanors.” The House is given the power to impeach a president – bring formal charges – and the Senate then convenes a trial, with the senators as jurors, with a two-thirds vote needed to convict a president and remove him from office.

The Constitution gives no role to the Supreme Court in impeachment, though it does assign the chief justice the task of presiding over the Senate trial. Conservative John Roberts currently serves as chief justice.

That would not preclude Trump from proceeding with litigation to tie up the issue in the courts, despite Supreme Court precedent upholding congressional impeachment power. In 1993, the nation’s top court ruled 9-0 in a case involving an impeached U.S. judge that the judiciary has no role in the impeachment process.

Lawrence Tribe, a constitutional law professor at Harvard who has been critical of Trump, said the U.S. founding fathers had considered but ultimately scrapped the idea of allowing the Supreme Court to have any role in the impeachment process.

“Not even a SCOTUS filled with Trump appointees would get in the way of the House or Senate,” Tribe said in a series of tweets on Wednesday.

Some congressional Republicans have urged the country to move forward after the Mueller report, while a few, including Senator Mitt Romney, have condemned Trump’s actions. Some conservatives outside of Congress have urged congressional action in the wake of Mueller’s report.

(Reporting by Susan Heavey, Steve Holland, Roberta Rampton and Makini Brice, Writing by John Whitesides, Editing by Andrea Ricci and Alistair Bell)

Source: OANN

The first Republican to announce a GOP 2020 primary challenge to President Donald Trump says “we would be much better off with a President Mike Pence.”

“For the good of the country, if he had the self-awareness that Richard Nixon had, sense of shame is too strong a word, but self-awareness is probably too soft a word, he would resign,” former Massachusetts Gov. Weld told MSNBC’s “The Last Word” on Tuesday night. “The truth is: We would be much better off with a President Mike Pence than a President Donald Trump.”

Weld warned against Democrats impeaching President Trump, because “those boils over at the White House are dying to have impeachment proceedings initiated so that Mr. Trump can scream like a stuffed pig.”

“It’s just going to give him such a delicious talking point the last few months before the election,” Weld told host Lawrence O’Donnell. 

Weld is ready to challenge President Trump in a Republican primary for the 2020 presidential candidacy, although Ohio Republican John Kasich and Maryland GOP Gov. Larry Hogan are weighing a run as well.

Weld admitted he will not bother campaigning in the deep red southern states, but he will focus on the northeast, mid-Atlantic, and California.

“It is time to return to the principles of Lincoln — equality, dignity, and opportunity for all,” he said at the time. “There is no greater cause on earth than to preserve what truly makes America great. I am ready to lead that fight.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: Former Vice President Biden speaks to reporters after speaking at electrical workers’ conference in Washington
FILE PHOTO: Former Vice President Joe Biden who is mulling a 2020 presidential candidacy, speaks to the media after speaking at the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers’ (IBEW) construction and maintenance conference in Washington, U.S., April 5, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts/File Photo

April 24, 2019

By Chris Kahn

NEW YORK (Reuters) – Former Vice President Joe Biden, expected to declare his run for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination on Thursday, leads all other candidates in the race and draws his strongest levels of support from minorities and older adults, according to a new Reuters/Ipsos public opinion poll.

The April 17-23 poll released on Wednesday focused on the vote preferences of 2,237 Democrats and independents: the two groups that may select the Democratic nominee in most of the statewide contests ahead of the 2020 general election.

(Graphic: Who is running in 2020 – https://graphics.reuters.com/USA-ELECTION/010091471JC/index.html)

According to the poll, 24 percent would vote for Biden over 19 other declared and potential candidates.

Another 15 percent said they would support U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who ran a competitive campaign for the Democratic nomination in 2016.

No other candidate received more than 7 percent of public support, and 21 percent said they “don’t know” which candidate they would back in a primary.

The poll measures how potential voters feel right now. Many may change their minds as they become better acquainted with the candidates. It has a credibility interval, a measure of precision, of 2 percentage points for the combined group of Democrats and independents.

The statewide nominating contests will kick off in early February next year, led by Iowa.

Biden, 76, who has sought the Democratic presidential nomination twice before, remains widely popular since he left the White House in 2016 after two terms as vice president. The former longtime U.S. senator will announce he is seeking the Democratic nomination https://reut.rs/2IAxNys on Thursday, a source familiar with the plans said on Tuesday.

Sixty-three percent of all Americans say they have a “favorable” impression of Biden, including 88 percent of Democrats, 59 percent of independents and 39 percent of Republicans.

In comparison, 58 percent of Americans said they have a favorable view of Sanders and Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, whose upstart campaign has out-raised some of his more established rivals this year.

All three appear to have stronger bipartisan appeal than Republican President Donald Trump. According to the poll, 44 percent of all adults said they have a generally favorable view of Trump.

Biden receives his strongest levels of support from older adults and minorities.

Thirty-two percent of adults who are 55 years old and older said they would vote for Biden over other candidates. And 30 percent of nonwhite adults, including about 4 in 10 African-Americans, said they would back Biden for the nomination.

The poll shows that at this early stage of the presidential campaign, Americans say they will vote for candidates who have been in the national spotlight for a long time.

Their preferences may change once they get to know other candidates for the Democratic nomination.

More than 80 percent of Democrats said they were at least “somewhat familiar” with Biden and Sanders.

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats were familiar with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and about half said they were familiar with former U.S. Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas or U.S. Senators Kamala Harris of California and Cory Booker of New Jersey.

The rest of the field appears to be largely unknown by a majority of Democrats.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English throughout the United States. It gathered responses from 4,018 adults in all, including 1,449 Democrats, 1,437 Republicans and 788 independents.

(To see the poll question and answers, please see: https://tmsnrt.rs/2W7qykY.)

(Reporting by Chris Kahn; Editing by Leslie Adler and Jonathan Oatis)

Source: OANN

Former Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen’s attempts to raise the alarm about Russian interference in American elections was thwarted by White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney, who told her not to bring up the subject with President Donald Trump, The New York Times reported on Wednesday.

Mulvaney made it clear that Trump viewed any public talk of malign Russian election activity with questions about the legitimacy of his victory and thus did not want the subject discussed.

Even though the Department of Homeland Security has the main responsibility for civilian cyberdefense and Nielsen was extremely concerned about Russia’s interference in the 2018 midterm elections and future ones, she gave up on attempts to organize a White House meeting of cabinet secretaries to coordinate a strategy to protect next year’s elections due to Trump’s attitude.

Nielsen’s frustrations were described to the Times by three senior administration officials and a former one, with the White House refusing to provide comment.

The opening page of the Worldwide Threat Assessment, which was compiled by government intelligence agencies and delivered to Congress earlier this year, warned that “Russia’s social media efforts will continue to focus on aggravating social and racial tensions, undermining trust in authorities and criticizing perceived anti-Russia politicians” and that Moscow may increase its tactis “in a more targeted fashion to influence U.S. policy, actions and elections.”

Nielsen grew so frustrated with Trump’s refusal to discuss an overall strategy that she twice held her own top-level meetings on the subject.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo denied that the administration sidestepped the topic, saying “I don’t think there’s been a discussion between a senior U.S. official and Russians in this administration where we have not raised this issue.”

Related Stories:

Source: NewsMax Politics

A person in an Easter Bunny costume looks on as U.S. President Trump attends the 2019 White House Easter Egg Roll in Washington
A person in an Easter Bunny costume looks on as U.S. President Donald Trump attends the 2019 White House Easter Egg Roll in Washington, U.S., April 22, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

April 24, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s main eavesdropping agency on Wednesday said allegations that it had been asked by the Obama administration to spy on Donald Trump after the 2016 presidential election were utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.

Trump on Wednesday tweeted that a former CIA analyst, Larry Johnson, had accused Britain of spying on the Trump campaign. Trump said: “It is now just a question of time before the truth comes out, and when it does, it will be a beauty!”

When asked about the tweet, a GCHQ spokesman said: “The allegations that GCHQ was asked to conduct ‘wire tapping’ against the then President Elect are nonsense. They are utterly ridiculous and should be ignored.”

(Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge, Editing by Paul Sandle)

Source: OANN

Former Vice President Joe Biden leads all other candidates for the 2020 Democrat presidential nomination and draws his strongest levels of support from minorities and older adults, according to a Reuters/Ipsos public poll released on Wednesday.

The April 17-23 poll focused on the vote preferences of 2,237 Democrats and independents – the two groups that may select the Democratic nominee in most of the statewide contests ahead of the 2020 general election.

According to the poll, 24 percent would vote for Biden over 19 other declared and potential candidates.

Another 15 percent said they would support U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who ran a competitive campaign for the Democrat nomination in 2016.

No other candidate received more than 7 percent of public support, and 21 percent said they “don’t know” which candidate they would back in a primary.

The poll measures how potential voters feel right now. Many may change their minds as they become better acquainted with the candidates. It has a credibility interval, a measure of precision, of 2 percentage points for the combined group of Democrats and independents.

The statewide nominating contests will kick off in early February next year, led by Iowa.

Biden, 76, who has sought the Democrat presidential nomination twice before and is expected to announce a third run later this week, remains widely popular since he left the White House in 2016 after two terms as vice president.

Sixty-three percent of all Americans say they have a “favorable” impression of Biden, including 88 percent of Democrats, 59 percent of independents and 39 percent of Republicans.

In comparison, 58 percent of Americans said they have a favorable view of Sanders and Pete Buttigieg, the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, whose upstart campaign has out-raised some of his more established rivals this year.

All three appear to have stronger bi-partisan appeal than President Donald Trump. According to the poll, 44 percent of all adults said they have a generally favorable view of Trump.

Biden receives his strongest levels of support from older adults and minorities.

Thirty-two percent of adults who are 55 years old and older said they would vote for Biden over other candidates. And 30 percent of non-white adults, including about 4 in 10 African-Americans, said they would back Biden for the nomination.

The poll shows that at this early stage of the presidential campaign, Americans say they will vote for candidates who have been in the national spotlight for a long time.

Their preferences may change once they get to know other candidates for the nomination.

More than 80 percent of Democrats said they were at least “somewhat familiar” with Biden and Sanders.

Sixty-seven percent of Democrats were familiar with Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and about half said they were familiar with former U.S. Representative Beto O’Rourke of Texas or U.S. Senators Kamala Harris of California and Cory Booker of New Jersey.

The rest of the field appears to be largely unknown by a majority of Democrats.

The Reuters/Ipsos poll was conducted online in English throughout the United States. It gathered responses from 4,018 adults in all, including 1,449 Democrats, 1,437 Republicans and 788 independents.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Nineteen months before the 2020 elections, one U.S. House race that now appears in play is New York’s 11th District (Staten Island-Brooklyn).

By nearly all accounts, Nicole Malliotakis, state assemblywoman and 2017 candidate for mayor of New York, is poised to carry the Republican and Conservative Party lines against freshman Democratic Rep. Max Rose.

In recent weeks, Malliotakis, 38, has raised eyebrows in political circles nationwide by raising more than $300,000 in the first quarter of the year—the most of any Republican non-incumbent U.S. House hopeful in the nation.

In addition, the announced House hopeful has received the maximum legal donation from House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy, Cal., and early endorsements from New York Republican Reps. Elise Stefanik and Lee Zeldin and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, Wash.

In a state where the third ballot line of the smaller Conservative Party has long been critical to the election of nearly all Republicans from the Empire State, its recently-elected Conservative Chairman Jerry Kassar told us Malliotakis “was a near certainty” to have the Conservative nomination for Congress in ’20.

“There’s just too much I addressed and wanted to change when I ran for mayor that an activist Member of Congress could do something about,” the feisty daughter of Cuban and Greek immigrants told Newsmax, “Sanctuary cities, the tax dollars that the [New York Democratic Mayor Bill] DeBlasio Administration has misused intended for public education and transportation, —they can be scrutinized at the federal level.”

But Malliotakis emphasized that “one can only have reform when there is a two-party system. Here in New York, we’ve seen what one-party rule can do and it’s not good. Right now, we have no Members of Congress from New York who aren’t Democrats. That has to change.”

Two years ago, the one-party rule Malliotakis spoke of came about when political newcomer Rose upset the 11th District’s Rep. Dan Donovan—the last Republican U.S. Representative from New York City. Prior to Rose’s election, the 11th had been in Republican hands for all but two of the previous 38 years.

“And while he plays middle-of-the-road back in the district, he is far on the left in Washington and on MSNBC,” observed the Malliotakis, “He supports DeBlasio’s sanctuary city policy, backs free college for illegal aliens, favors late-term abortion and lowering the voting age to sixteen.”

Malliotakis, whose Assembly district is contained within the boundaries of the 11th District, carried 70 percent of the vote in Staten Island when she ran for mayor. In the Brooklyn portion of the district, her margin was 58 percent.

“And one thing I can’t wait to do when I’m in Congress is take on [New York’s far-left Democratic Rep.] Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez—on the House floor and on TV,” she told us, “My Mom was a refugee from Castro’s Cuba, and anyone who wants to take us down the road to socialism is on my bad side.”

John Gizzi is chief political columnist and White House correspondent for Newsmax. For more of his reports, Go Here Now.

Source: NewsMax Politics

FILE PHOTO: Candidate Zelenskiy waves to supporters following the announcement of an exit poll in Ukraine's presidential election in Kiev
FILE PHOTO: Ukrainian presidential candidate Volodymyr Zelenskiy waves to supporters following the announcement of the first exit poll in a presidential election at his campaign headquarters in Kiev, Ukraine April 21, 2019. REUTERS/Viacheslav Ratynskyi

April 24, 2019

By Pavel Polityuk

KIEV (Reuters) – Ukrainian President-elect Volodymyr Zelenskiy on Wednesday called on the government and state energy company Naftogaz to hold talks with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) on lowering household gas prices from May 1.

The IMF, which is helping Ukraine with a multi-billion dollar loan program, has said it wants to see gas prices set at their market level.

Zelenskiy, who has yet to take office but won a landslide election victory on Sunday, said in a statement on his team’s Facebook page he wanted prices to be lower.

“Let’s not just in words, but in deeds show that we can take decisions in people’s interests,” the statement said.

“For the past four months, gas prices in Europe have been decreasing and now the price of gas for the population in Ukraine is higher than the price of gas on the European market.”

The same statement warned that neighboring Russia might limit energy supplies to Ukraine from June 1, and that, from Jan. 1, Moscow might move to halt gas transit through Ukraine altogether, a move it said would result in significant financial losses and gas supply risks.

“These challenges require us to take effective and fast action,” the statement said.

An IMF spokesman was not immediately available to comment.

Prime Minister Volodymyr Groysman in March said he would urge the finance ministry and Naftogaz to start talks with the IMF to try to prevent any future rise in gas tariffs.

The government raised gas prices by nearly a quarter in October, allowing it to secure a new $3.9 billion stand-by aid agreement with the IMF.

According to a previously adopted government resolution, gas prices were due to rise by 15 percent from May 1. But earlier this week the government and Naftogaz agreed a slight decrease in tariffs.

Naftogaz said prices would fall by around 3.5 percent to 8,247 hryvnias ($310.56) per 1,000 cubic meters from May 1.

(Reporting by Pavel Polityuk; Writing by Andrew Osborn; Editing by Matthias Williams)

Source: OANN


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