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Corey Jones’s family sang the gospel song “Victory is Mine” as they walked out of a Florida courthouse, celebrating after a judge handed a 25-year sentence to a former police officer for killing the stranded black motorist in 2015.

Fired Palm Beach Gardens officer Nouman Raja on Thursday became the first Florida law enforcement agent in nearly 30 years to be convicted and sentenced for an on-duty killing — and one of only a few officers nationwide.

Raja, 41, had told investigators he fired after Jones pulled a gun on him, but an audiotape of their encounter led prosecutors and jurors to believe Raja instigated their altercation. And last month a jury convicted Raja of manslaughter and attempted murder in the death of the 31-year-old musician who was gunned down after his SUV stalled on the road home from a nightclub performance.

“We knew what the truth was and we stood by that,” his father, Clinton Jones Sr., told reporters after Thursday’s sentencing. He said he never doubted Raja was the aggressor. “Because of the son we had raised and the type of character he had, we knew … it wasn’t our Corey.”

The families of both Raja and Jones had packed Circuit Judge Joseph Marx’s courtroom, but there was hushed silence as Marx pronounced sentence. He could have given Raja a life term, a sentence prosecutors sought.

“This has been a heartbreaking case,” Marx said. “I think it has had a profound effect on every single person who sat through this trial.”

Raja’s wife, Karine, had sought leniency so her husband could be a father to their two young children. She said the media and others had unfairly portrayed him as “a monster, the angel of death.” Raja, in blue jail jumpsuit, looked down often as she spoke.

“The wrong person was chosen to be a sacrificial lamb,” she said. “Raja is the man you wanted serving and protecting you.” His attorneys vow to appeal.

Prosecutors contended Raja escalated a seemingly routine interaction into a deadly confrontation with Jones, a housing inspector and part-time drummer. Raja’s attorneys argued his actions were in self-defense both for a police officer and under Florida’s controversial “stand your ground” law.

Raja, of Asian descent, was in plain clothes for an auto burglary investigation team when he spotted Jones’ SUV at 3:15 a.m. on Oct. 18, 2015. Jones was headed home from a nightclub performance by his reggae band when his vehicle stalled on a dark highway off-ramp. He had a concealed-weapons permit and carried a handgun, purchased days earlier to protect his $10,000 drum set, which was in the SUV.

Raja, wearing jeans, a T-shirt and a baseball cap, drove an unmarked van the wrong way up an off ramp within feet of the SUV.

Prosecutors said Raja never identified himself as an officer and acted so aggressively Jones must have thought he was about to be carjacked or killed. Raja’s supervisor testified the officer had been told to don a police vest if he approached a civilian. He didn’t, nor did he pull his badge.

What police didn’t know at first was that Jones had been talking to a tow-truck dispatcher on a recorded line. That recording shows Jones saying “Huh?” as his door opens. Raja yells, “You good?” Jones says he is. Raja replies twice, “Really?” with Jones replying “Yeah.”

Suddenly, Raja shouts at Jones to raise his hands, using an expletive. Jones replies, “Hold on!” and Raja repeats his demand.

Prosecutors believe Jones pulled his gun and tried to run. Raja fired three shots; Jones ran down an embankment. Prosecutors said he threw his gun, but Raja fired three more times, 10 seconds after the first volley. One of the bullets pierced the man’s heart. Jones was also hit in both arms.

Prosecutors said Raja, not knowing of the audio recording, sought to deceive investigators. He claimed he said “Police, can I help you?” as Jones jumped from the SUV. He also told them Jones leapt backward and pointed his gun, forcing him to fire. Raja said Jones ran but turned and again pointed his gun, forcing him to fire the second volley.

Prosecutors charged Raja with manslaughter, saying his actions created the confrontation and showed “culpable negligence.” They also charged him with attempted murder, saying no matter which of Raja’s six shots killed Jones, the second volley was a conscious effort to kill the fleeing man.

The last Florida officer sentenced for an on-duty killing was Miami’s William Lozano in 1989. The Hispanic officer fatally shot a black motorcyclist who he said tried to hit him. A passenger died when the motorcycle crashed. Three days of rioting followed.

Convicted of two manslaughter counts in a Miami trial and sentenced to seven years, Lozano never served time. State appellate court justices dismissed the verdict, saying the case should have been moved from Miami because of racial tensions. Lozano was acquitted at a 1993 retrial in Orlando.

Source: Fox News National

A white former Chicago police officer convicted of killing a black teenager was emotionally distraught in the days that followed the 2014 shooting, according to a newly released psychologist’s report.

The report was among nearly 90 unsealed court filings related to Jason Van Dyke’s prosecution released Wednesday in response to a lawsuit by media organizations.

Dr. Laurence Miller, a psychologist hired by the defense, worked with Van Dyke as he prepared for trial. In April 2016, the Florida-based psychologist interviewed Van Dyke via Skype.

Van Dyke told Miller that “time froze” when he shot Laquan McDonald 16 times, the report said. The 41-year-old officer added that he was “not that good a shot with the handgun” and thought the shots may have missed the 17-year-old as he walked down the road while holding a small knife.

“He (recalled) thinking, ‘Why isn’t (McDonald) falling, why isn’t he stopping?'” the report said.

Dashcam video of the shooting shows Van Dyke continued firing when McDonald was on the ground.

Miller noted Van Dyke said he didn’t feel like himself upon returning to work. He told Miller that when co-workers came to shake his hand, “I just felt shell-shocked.” The officer declined to join his partner days later in pursuing a gun-wielding suspect after the call for help came from the same 7-Eleven where they had parked before pursuing McDonald, Miller said.

“His partner ran after the suspect while Van Dyke stood by the car ‘pretending to be looking,'” wrote Miller.

A key moment from the trial excluded from the psychologist’s report was when prosecutors cross-examined Miller. Just before arriving to the scene, Van Dyke told his partner, “Oh my God, we are going to have to shoot the guy,” according to Miller.

Van Dyke was sentenced in January to nearly seven years in prison. With credit for time served while awaiting his sentencing and projected day-for-day credit for good conduct, records show Van Dyke is scheduled to be released in February 2022.

Source: Fox News National

The death certificate of Boston mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger revealed that the notorious criminal died last year from “blunt force injuries of the head.”

The document obtained by Fox News from the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources on Thursday showed that the 89-year-old was found dead on Oct. 30, 2018 at 8:21 a.m.

FLASHBACK: MURDERED GANGSTER WHITEY BULGER HOPED FOR ‘PEACEFUL DEATH’

The death certificate of Boston mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger revealed that the notorious criminal died last year from “blunt force injuries of the head.”

The death certificate of Boston mob boss James “Whitey” Bulger revealed that the notorious criminal died last year from “blunt force injuries of the head.” (West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources)

He sustained injuries as a result of being “assaulted by other(s),” which occurred in his “prison cell” at the U.S. Penitentiary, Hazelton in Bruceton Mills, W.V., the certificate said.

The “final manner of death” was deemed to be a homicide, according to the document.

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The death of Bulger, who was a fugitive for 16 years and sentenced to life in prison in 2013, came after he was moved from a prison in Florida and had a stop in Oklahoma City before arriving at the high-security facility in West Virginia.

Fox News’ Ryan Gaydos contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News National

One of the seven puppies that were rescued after being dropped behind the back of a dumpster in California last week has died, according to animal services.

The foster volunteer who took in the pups said they believe the one who died was either the runt of the litter, or might have been at the bottom of the plastic bag that was dumped behind an auto parts store in Coachella on April 18.

38 DOGS IMPOUNDED FROM HOME OF COACHELLA WOMAN WHO ALLEGEDLY DUMPED 7 PUPPIES NEXT TO DUMPSTER

“He was just so weak and held on for as long as he could,” the foster wrote in a Facebook post. “When I got him he was pale and kind of flat looking, so I think he was the cushion that saved his siblings.”

The volunteer believes “he was at the bottom and took the hit when all of his siblings landed on him,” but the other six dogs, who were around 3 days old when they were discovered last week, are “thriving.”

Deborah Sue Culwell, 54, was arrested at her home in Coachella, California, on Monday, officials said.

Deborah Sue Culwell, 54, was arrested at her home in Coachella, California, on Monday, officials said. (Riverside County Animal Services)

Surveillance footage was released of 54-year-old Deborah Sue Culwell allegedly dumping the litter of pups. She was arrested at her home on Monday, where Riverside County Animal Services found and impounded 38 dogs living in squalor.

“Most of the dogs appeared to be in somewhat healthy condition, but some were aggressive or fearful,” John Welsh, of Riverside County Animal Services, said in a news release. “The house was in a state of disrepair.”

Authorities impounded 38 dogs from Culwell's home.

Authorities impounded 38 dogs from Culwell’s home. (Riverside County Animal Services)

The 38 dogs are currently being cared for at the Coachella Valley Animal Campus in Thousand Palms, where veterinarians said none of the dogs appear to have serious illnesses.

Culwell, meanwhile, still maintains ownership of the dogs, according to Welsh. He said that each day the 38 dogs remain in the care of Riverside County Animal Services, Culwell is billed $570 in boarding and care fees. That number excludes the cost of “vaccinations, examination fees, medications, nor state-mandated fees” that are necessary for the dogs.

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Officials said Culwell has 10 days to request a hearing to maintain or relinquish ownership of the dogs, but after that period is over, animal services can work to rehome the dogs.

Culwell faces up to seven felony counts of animal cruelty. According to online records from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office, she’s scheduled to appear in court on June 18.

Source: Fox News National

Kansas child welfare authorities investigated two reports of possible abuse or neglect involving a Wichita couple in the 17 months before their 3-year-old son was found dead in his crib.

The Kansas Department of Children and Families on Thursday completed its investigation into the April 12 death of Zaiden Javonovich, who authorities believe was dead days before his body was discovered.

In a report summary obtained by The Associated Press through an open records request, the agency said it found physical abuse and neglect in the case but provided no other details.

Zaiden’s mother, Brandi Marchant, 22, and his father, Patrick Javonovich, 28, are charged with felony murder and child abuse in Zaiden’s death. His body was found April 11 when police went to the home after receiving a call about a domestic disturbance. Zaiden’s 4-month-old brother, who is Marchant’s son, was found injured and hospitalized in critical condition.

In November 2017, the Department of Children and Families investigated possible emotional abuse after a report that Marchant made homicidal and suicidal statements in front of the children. One child who reported a homicidal statement mentioned Zaiden, according to the report. Several people were interviewed but investigators could not substantiate the claim.

A year later, the department was told the younger boy tested positive for marijuana at birth. The case could not be investigated as an abuse/neglect case because medical officials did not indicate the boy’s health was hurt by marijuana use, the summary states.

Instead, a Family in Need of Assessment case was started. A social worker who met with the couple found both children appearing healthy, with all necessary supplies for the infant, according to the report. The parents, who are not married, completed a federally required plan of safe care and in another visit, Marchant completed a Department of Children and Families safety plan. The case was closed Jan. 14.

The Wichita Eagle reported the agency rejected a request for information about the younger boy. Spokesman Eric Smith confirmed the department received a report of alleged abuse and is investigating.

Source: Fox News National

A white former Chicago police officer convicted of killing a black teenager in 2014 was emotionally distraught in the days that followed the shooting, according to a newly released psychologist’s report.

The report was among nearly 90 unsealed court filings related to Jason Van Dyke’s prosecution released Wednesday in response to a lawsuit by media organizations.

Dr. Laurence Miller, a psychologist hired by the defense, worked with Van Dyke as he prepared for trial. In April 2016, the Florida-based psychologist interviewed Van Dyke via Skype.

Van Dyke told Miller that “time froze” as he fired 16 shots at Laquan McDonald, the report said. The 41-year-old officer added that he was “not that good a shot with the handgun” and thought the shots may have missed the 17-year-old as he walked down the road while holding a small knife.

“He (recalled) thinking, ‘Why isn’t (McDonald) falling, why isn’t he stopping?'” the report said.

Miller noted Van Dyke said he didn’t feel like himself upon returning to work. He told Miller that when co-workers came to shake his hand, “I just felt shell-shocked.” The officer declined to join his partner days later in pursuing a gun-wielding suspect after the call for help came from the same 7-Eleven where they had parked before pursuing McDonald, Miller said.

“His partner ran after the suspect while Van Dyke stood by the car ‘pretending to be looking,'” wrote Miller.

A key moment from the trial excluded from the psychologist’s report was when prosecutors cross-examined Miller. Just before arriving to the scene, Van Dyke told his partner, “Oh my God, we are going to have to shoot the guy,” according to Miller.

Van Dyke was sentenced in January to nearly 7 years in prison. With credit for time served while awaiting his sentencing and projected day-for-day credit for good conduct, records show Van Dyke is scheduled to be released in February 2022.

Source: Fox News National

A Long Island man ran a prostitution ring out of his elderly parents’ sprawling suburban home, enticing women with drugs and locking them in a basement where he forced them to use a bucket instead of a bathroom, prosecutors said Thursday.

Raymond Rodio III, 47, used social media to recruit and advertise the women, got them hooked on heroin or crack cocaine, and forced them to have sex with men in the basement of the home, in Sound Beach, or at nearby motels, Suffolk County District Attorney Tim Sini said.

“This is a dangerous and depraved individual,” Sini said after Rodio’s arraignment. “He kept women locked up in the basement of his parents’ house. He used the basement of his parents’ home as a dungeon.”

Rodio operated the ring for about four years and victimized more than 20 women, Sini said.

Rodio’s parents, who are in their 70s, may have known “something untoward” was going on, but not necessarily that their son was running a prostitution ring, Sini said. They are not charged with a crime.

Rodio pleaded not guilty Thursday to sex trafficking, promoting prostitution and other charges. He remains jailed because he hasn’t posted $1 million cash bail or $2 million bond.

His next court appearance is scheduled for May 21. If convicted of the top charge, he faces up to 25 years in prison.

A message seeking comment was left with his lawyer.

Police uncovered the alleged prostitution ring after a routine traffic stop last August. Officers recognized that a passenger in the car appeared to be a victim of human trafficking, Sini said.

“As chilling and cruel as this case is, sex trafficking would not be possible or lucrative if not for the people who pay to the opportunity to sexually degrade the women being kept in these conditions,” said National Sexual Violence Resource Center spokeswoman Kristen Houser.

From the outside, Rodio’s parents’ home appears typical of Sound Beach — a quiet, waterfront community about 60 miles (100 kilometers) east of midtown Manhattan on Long Island’s north shore. Recent photos show a half-dozen American flags in the home’s spacious, meticulously manicured yard. There are birdhouses, wagon wheels and a driveway basketball hoop.

Inside, through a door and down the stairs from an unfinished garage, was a vile, windowless hellscape where Rodio held women for long stretches without access to a shower, a bathroom or the outside world, Sini said.

Rodio’s makeshift brothel featured a bed with a leopard-print comforter, but also walls lined with family portraits and Jesus on a prayer card, Sini said. There were shelves full of lotions, a bottle of chocolate syrup and “all sorts of items that one could suspect were used in sex acts,” Sini said.

“It’s disgusting,” he said.

In recruiting women, Sini said, Rodio targeted women who appeared to have drug dependence or who were somehow otherwise vulnerable. He would initially supply them with drugs for free so they would be dependent on him, the prosecutor said. Then, after setting them up with clients, he’d give them heroin or crack to impair their judgment, Sini said.

Rodio would use the money the clients paid to buy the women more drugs and underwrite his own crack habit, Sini said. If they resisted seeing a client or didn’t fork over enough of the fees, he’d scream at them, Sini said. The flow of drugs made the women indebted to Rodio, Sini said, and the only way they could repay it was by performing sex acts.

“This is a common tactic used by traffickers. They essentially force their victims to become addicted to drugs, then use that addiction — that illness — to keep victims under their control,” Sini said.

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Follow Michael Sisak at twitter.com/mikesisak

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Source: Fox News National

A New York jury on Thursday convicted an extravagant socialite who bankrolled an implausibly lavish lifestyle with tens of thousands of dollars she swindled from banks, hotels and friends who believed she was a wealthy German heiress.

The Manhattan jury found Anna Sorokin guilty of four counts of theft of services, three counts of grand larceny and one count of attempted grand larceny following a monthlong trial that attracted international attention. She was acquitted of one count of grand larceny and one count of attempted grand larceny. She is to be sentenced May 9.

Sorokin also faces deportation to Germany because authorities say she overstayed her visa.

Using the name Anna Delvey, Sorokin deceived friends and financial institutions into believing she had a fortune of about $67 million (60 million euros) overseas that would cover her high-end clothing, luxury hotel stays and trans-Atlantic travel.

She claimed her father was diplomat or an oil baron and went to extraordinary lengths to have others pay her way. Prosecutors said she promised one friend an all-expenses paid trip to Morocco but then stuck her with the $62,000 bill.

She also forged financial records in an application for a $22 million loan to fund a private arts club she wanted to build, complete with exhibitions, installations and pop-up shops, prosecutors said. She was denied the loan but persuaded one bank to lend her $100,000 she failed to repay.

Her defense attorney, Todd Spodek, insisted Sorokin planned to settle her six-figure debts and was merely “buying time.”

Source: Fox News National

A Coast Guard lieutenant accused of being a domestic terrorist is entitled to be released from custody before his trial on firearms and drug charges, a federal magistrate said Thursday.

U.S. Magistrate Judge Charles Day noted that 50-year-old Christopher Hasson hasn’t been charged with any terrorism related offenses. Hasson was arrested Feb. 15 and is awaiting trial on firearms and drug charges. Prosecutors have said he created a hit list of prominent Democrats, two Supreme Court justices, network TV journalists and social media company executives.

Day said he still has “grave concerns” about Hasson based on information prosecutors have presented. The magistrate said Hasson is “going to have to have a whole lot of supervision” before his release, a process that could take several days.

Marcia Murphy, a spokeswoman for U.S. Attorney Robert Hur’s office, said prosecutors would oppose any conditions of release for Hasson.

Day didn’t order Hasson to be immediately released. The magistrate gave Hasson’s defense attorney, Liz Oyer, a few days to arrange conditions of release that would be acceptable to the court. Prosecutors have vowed to appeal if Day does order his release.

Oyer said her client hadn’t made any direct or specific threats to harm anyone. She said prosecutors are seeking to punish Hasson for “private thoughts” that he never shared.

“They have not come forward with evidence that Mr. Hasson is a domestic terrorist because he is not,” she told Day.

But prosecutors have said Hasson is a self-described white nationalist who espoused extremist views for years and “intends to murder innocent civilians on a scale rarely seen in this country.” In a February court filing, prosecutors said Hasson drafted an email in which he said he was “dreaming of a way to kill almost every last person on the earth.”

Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Windom said prosecutors had presented “clear and convincing evidence” that Hasson poses a danger to the public.

“The dots were connected directly by the defendant with his own writings,” Windom said.

Prosecutors have said Hasson appeared to be planning attacks inspired by the manifesto of Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian right-wing extremist who killed 77 people in a 2011 bomb-and-shooting rampage.

On Feb. 21, Day ordered Hasson to be held without bond. At that time, however, the magistrate said he was willing to revisit his decision if prosecutors didn’t bring more serious charges within two weeks.

On Thursday, Day said he was inclined to order home confinement with electronic monitoring for Hasson and restrict his access to firearms and computers. The magistrate gave Oyer a few days to present him with a proposal before Hasson can be freed.

Prosecutors claim Hasson drew up what appeared to be a computer-spreadsheet hit list that included House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer and Democratic presidential hopefuls Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker and Kamala Harris. Several network TV journalists — MSNBC’s Chris Hayes and Joe Scarborough and CNN’s Chris Cuomo and Van Jones — also were mentioned.

Hasson also targeted two Supreme Court justices and two social media company executives, prosecutors said in a court filing Tuesday. The filing doesn’t name them, but it says Hasson searched online for their home addresses in March 2018, within minutes before and after searching firearm sales websites.

Investigators found 15 guns, including seven rifles, and more than 1,000 rounds of ammunition at Hasson’s basement apartment in Silver Spring, Maryland, prosecutors said.

“He has these ready to go, ready for use,” Windom said.

Oyer said Hasson has had a lifelong interest in firearms and likes to hunt and target practice. She said the number of guns he owned isn’t unusual in North Carolina, where he lived for years before moving to Maryland.

Hasson’s Feb. 27 indictment also accuses him of illegal possession of tramadol, an opioid painkiller.

Hasson pleaded not guilty last month to charges of illegal possession of firearm silencers, possession of firearms by a drug addict and unlawful user, and possession of a controlled substance. He faces a maximum of 31 years in prison if convicted of all four counts in his indictment.

Hasson, a former Marine, worked at Coast Guard headquarters in Washington on a program to acquire advanced new cutters for the agency. A Coast Guard spokesman has said Hasson will remain on active duty until the case against him is resolved.

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This story has been edited to correct the short headline and the judge’s first name.

Source: Fox News National

A former Minneapolis police officer on trial in the fatal shooting of an unarmed woman testified Thursday that he saw a woman in a pink shirt with blond hair at his partner’s window, raising her right arm, before he fired his gun “to stop the threat.”

Mohamed Noor refused to talk to investigators after the July 2017 shooting of Justine Ruszczyk Damond , a dual citizen of the U.S. and Australia, making his testimony his first public statements since her death.

Damond had called 911 minutes earlier to report a possible sexual assault behind her home, and was shot as she approached Noor’s squad car as he and his partner slowly rolled down her alley looking for evidence of a woman in distress.

Noor testified that he fired to stop what he thought was a threat to him and his partner, Matthew Harrity, after he heard a loud bang on the driver’s side of the squad car.

Noor said he saw fear in Harrity’s eyes and saw that Harrity was trying to pull his gun but was having difficulty.

He described putting his left arm over Harrity’s chest, and seeing a woman in a pink shirt with blond hair outside Harrity’s driver’s side window raising her right arm.

“I fired one shot,” Noor said. “My intent was to stop the threat.”

When he realized he had shot an innocent woman, Noor said, “I felt like my whole world came crashing down.”

“I couldn’t breathe,” Noor said. “I felt great pain.”

Prosecutor Amy Sweasy attacked Noor in cross-examination, noting that Noor didn’t see Damond’s hands or a weapon.

“You meant to shoot the woman to stop the threat?” she asked. “You knew you were shooting a person?”

“Yes ma’am,” he answered.

Earlier Thursday, Noor described the unorthodox path he took to becoming an officer — he was working as a pharmaceutical analyst before deciding to switch careers — and then detailed his 29-week cadet training in 2015.

Noor was fired from the force soon after being charged. His attorneys have said he was spooked by a noise on his squad car right before the shooting and feared an ambush.

Noor described “counter-ambush” training that included scenarios such as two officers in a squad car, doing routine tasks, and an instructor yelling “Threat!” The officers had to make a quick decision about whether to shoot, Noor said.

“Action is better than reaction,” Noor said. “If you’re reacting, that means it’s too late … to protect yourself … you die.”

Noor described another training exercise where he was sent to a location, heard gunshots and instead of assessing the threat, he ran toward it. An instructor shot him with a paintball gun, he said.

“So the point is if you don’t do your job correctly, you’ll get killed,” defense attorney Thomas Plunkett said.

“Yes sir,” Noor answered.

The death of Damond, a 40-year-old life coach who was engaged to be married a month after her death, sparked anger and disbelief in both the U.S. and Australia, cost the city’s police chief her job and contributed to the mayor’s electoral defeat a few months later.

Prosecutors have questioned the supposed noise, presumably from Damond slapping the car as she approached, by noting that investigators didn’t find forensic evidence of Damond’s fingerprints on the car. They also questioned the timing of Harrity’s first mention of the thump — not the night of the shooting, but a few days later, as he was being interviewed by state investigators.

Neither officer had their body cameras running when Damond was shot, something Harrity blamed on what he called a vague policy that didn’t require it. The department toughened the policy after Damond’s death to require that the cameras be turned on when responding to a call.

Damond was white. Noor, 33, is a Somali American whose hiring two years before the shooting was celebrated by Minneapolis leaders as a sign of a diversifying police force in a city with a large population of Somali immigrants.

Noor testified earlier Thursday about immigrating from Somalia to the U.S., where he became a citizen in 1999. He lived first in Chicago, then moved to Minneapolis, where he said he fell in love with the city.

He said he became a police officer because he “wanted to serve.”

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Follow Amy Forliti on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/amyforliti

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Check out the AP’s complete coverage of Mohamed Noor’s trial: https://apnews.com/MohamedNoortrial

Source: Fox News National


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