John McCain

The family of the late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., will back former Vice President Joe Biden for president, the Washington Examiner is reporting.

The McCain family intends to support Biden through the Democratic primaries, the Examiner reported. The McCains also would throw their support behind him in a race against President Donald Trump in the general election, should Biden make it.

Sources tell the Examiner, McCain’s widow, Cindy, and daughter Meghan, 34, will publicly offer their support in an attempt to get Trump out of office in 2020.

A McCain family source said there have been talks with the McCains and Biden family about his 2020 run.

“The question is going to be timing and coordinating with the Biden campaign,” the source said. “There are a lot of moving parts there and (Biden’s campaign is) not necessarily organized. I wouldn’t expect a formal family endorsement because some of McCain’s family is still in the military, but I do expect Cindy to speak out at some point.”

The senator died last August after a battle with brain cancer. He and Trump had been locked in a feud during the 2016 campaign. And in 2017, McCain cast the deciding vote that end the GOP’s effort to repeal Obamacare. Trump has remained critical of McCain since the senator’s death.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Prominent conservative donors who avoided President Donald Trump’s 2016 campaign are now participating in a new fundraising drive for Trump ahead of his re-election bid, Politico reports.

Donors to former President George W. Bush and former presidential candidates Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Mitt Romney, R-Utah, have agreed to steer their fundraising networks toward Trump. Politico compares the project to the Pioneers network that backed Bush’s first presidential campaign. The program will offer rewards, such as invitations to retreats, briefings, and dinners sponsored by the campaign, to donors who give $25,000 or more to the Trump Victory fund.

“I think you’ll have a significant number of Bush and Romney veterans that were on the sidelines or didn’t get overly involved in 2016 but will be involved in the 2020 campaign,” said Jack Oliver, a longtime GOP fundraiser who helped President Bush and his brother Jeb Bush in their presidential campaigns.

“There were still a lot of people who were trying to lick their wounds and hadn’t quite gotten over the fact that he [Trump] had whipped everybody. They were slow to come on board,” said Roy Bailey, a fundraiser and one of the leaders of the Trump Victory project. He added about 150 people have joined.

“I’ve had a couple of people that in 2016, they just weren’t on board with candidate Trump at all and they said, ‘Look, Roy, he has won me over. I’m all in,'” he said.

Source: NewsMax America

Former CIA director James Woolsey said unfounded claims by former members of the intelligence community that President Donald Trump is guilty of conspiring with the Russians is as perplexing as a clock chiming for a 13th time.

Woolsey was on Newsmax TV's "Newsmax Now" Wednesday night and was asked specifically about former CIA director John Brennan, who has insisted for two years that Trump colluded with the Russians. It was unveiled last weekend that special counsel Robert Mueller came to the opposite conclusion.

"I think it hurts generally when you accuse someone of something as serious as essentially aide and comfort to the enemy of the United States, and you don't have any evidence to that effect," Woolsey said. "And then it turns out, as it looks right now, they don't have evidence.

"That's like the 13th chime of a clock. It's bizarre in and of itself, and it calls into question everything from the same source."

Woolsey added that Trump's repeated criticisms of the late Sen. John McCain are also similar to a clock's extra tone, and then added that Americans should return to using facts as supporting evidence for discussion, rather than opinions.

"I wish we could have a more civil and fair-minded and evidence-based statement of people's objectives and policies, rather than the kind of thing we saw, falsely apparently, claiming treason," he said.

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Source: NewsMax Politics

Former CIA Director James Woolsey said unfounded claims by former members of the intelligence community that President Donald Trump is guilty of conspiring with the Russians is as perplexing as a clock chiming for a 13th time.

Woolsey was on Newsmax TV's "Newsmax Now" on Wednesday night and was asked specifically about former CIA Director John Brennan, who has insisted for two years that Trump colluded with the Russians. It was unveiled last weekend that special counsel Robert Mueller came to the opposite conclusion.

"I think it hurts generally when you accuse someone of something as serious as essentially aide and comfort to the enemy of the United States, and you don't have any evidence to that effect," Woolsey said. "And then it turns out, as it looks right now, they don't have evidence.

"That's like the 13th chime of a clock. It's bizarre in and of itself, and it calls into question everything from the same source."

Woolsey added Trump's repeated criticisms of the late Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., are also similar to a clock's extra tone, and then added Americans should return to using facts as supporting evidence for discussion, rather than opinions.

"I wish we could have a more civil and fair-minded and evidence-based statement of people's objectives and policies, rather than the kind of thing we saw, falsely apparently, claiming treason," he said.

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Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., on Wednesday dismissed critics of his support for President Donald Trump despite Trump’s harsh remarks about Graham’s best friend, the late Sen. John McCain.

In a blunt interview on CNN's “At This Hour With Kate Bolduan,” Graham trashed “those people who bring up this narrative.”

“You just hate Trump,” Graham told Bolduan. “You don’t really care about McCain and me. I know this. This is a game. You’re not offended about me and McCain, you’re trying to use me to get to Trump. I’m not playing that game.”

“If you think the only way to honor John McCain is to tell this president, ‘I won’t work with you, I won’t ever help you,’ that’s your agenda, not mine,” he continued. 

“My agenda is two-fold, to honor my friend for the rest of my life in any way I can, and help this president be successful, and I’m not into this idea that the the only way to honor John McCain is to trash out Trump.”

“I’m the senator of South Carolina and I’m going to do what the people of South Carolina want me to do: help make this president successful,” Graham declared.

Bolduan also brought up that Trump and his supporters are saying that John McCain “shopped” the unverified anti-Trump dossier compiled by ex-British spy Christopher Steele “all over town” — but Graham clarified someone from the McCain Institute may have done so but that John McCain acted responsibly.

“Well I told [Trump] yeah,” he responded when asked if he told that to Trump.

“I mean, I don’t care – I’m not out to please the president about John McCain. He’s my friend, John McCain. I loved the guy to death. He’s an American hero,” said Graham. “I want to help the president and I like him.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

Sen. Lindsey Graham said he told President Donald Trump that it was he who advised the late Sen. John McCain to turn over the Steele dossier of Trump-Russia allegations to the FBI, and that McCain deserves better than the way the president has been publicly disparaging him, CNN reported on Monday.

Graham rejected Trump's assertions that the Arizona Republican leaked the dossier to the press and helped bring about the Russia probe.

Trump renewed his attacks against McCain earlier this month, harshly criticizing him for his vote against a Republican attempt to repeal Obamacare and his decision to turn the Steele dossier over to the FBI, The Hill reported.

According to CNN, Graham said he “told the president it was not John McCain. I know because John McCain showed me the dossier. And I told him… Turn it over to somebody who's job it is to find these things out and John McCain acted appropriately" by immediately doing so.

The South Carolina senator said some people connected with McCain “did some things inappropriate but it was not John McCain" who gave it to the press.

Graham stressed that “John McCain is one of my closest friends in life, not just in politics. I want President Trump to be successful. He's been very good to me in the sense he's let me in his world. And I have some access to the president about things that matter to me and the country and I appreciate that."

Source: NewsMax Politics

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as he returns to the White House in Washington
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters as the president returns from a weekend in Florida at the White House in Washington, U.S., March 24, 2019. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

March 25, 2019

By Steve Holland, Jeff Mason and Roberta Rampton

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s conclusion that Donald Trump did not collude with Russia to win the presidency in 2016 gives the president a powerful weapon to use against his Democratic opponents and a potential boost to what is shaping up to be a tough bid for re-election in 2020.

Mueller’s conclusion that neither Trump nor his aides conspired with Russia in 2016 takes away a central charge that Democrats have flung at Trump for two years – that he did not win the presidency fairly or cleanly. The allegations have played out on an endless loop on cable TV news shows, overshadowing Trump’s presidency from day one.

Democrats have vowed to continue congressional investigations into the 2016 election campaign and Trump’s business practices. But without the solid foundation of a Mueller report that found evidence of any crimes by the president, they now risk seeming to overplay their hand.

“This is a gold star day for Donald Trump,” said presidential historian Douglas Brinkley. “Now the shackles are off. He’s able to demonize the news media and Democrats as perpetuating what he calls a hoax. And he’ll be able to use his innocence as fodder for the campaign trail.”

The question for Trump now is whether he will be able to bring a minimum of discipline to his campaign messaging and to the presidency itself.

History suggests he will have trouble with self-discipline. Just last week, he was immersed in a strange fight with a dead man, sharply criticizing the late Republican Senator John McCain and falsely accusing him of being at the root of some of the collusion allegations against him.

He has also been prone to making baffling abrupt decisions, such as occurred last week when he called off a round of sanctions against North Korea before they had even been imposed.

Despite the Mueller report’s conclusions, Trump remains an intemperate president, eager to lash out at any and all critics and perceived slights.

“This was an illegal takedown that failed,” Trump said on Sunday, even though Mueller left open the question of whether the former real estate magnate had attempted to obstruct the Russia probe, which did find extensive evidence that Russia meddled in the 2016 election.

“Now is the time to get back on the offense on the economy and growth,” said Republican strategist Scott Reed. “This is a good time to get back to a real healthy dose of message discipline for the entire administration, department-wide and the White House. That’s what you do when something like this happens.”

Trump, on a golfing weekend in Palm Beach, Florida, got the news in his private quarters at his Mar-a-Lago retreat from White House counsel Emmett Flood, and watched TV coverage of the Mueller report in his cabin on Air Force One.

Trump’s initial comments in reacting to the Mueller conclusion suggests he is not inclined to move past the investigation.

Speaking to reporters before boarding Air Force One for the flight back to Washington, Trump called for Democrats to be investigated, expanding on his often repeated assertion that the Mueller probe was Democrat-inspired. Mueller was appointed by Trump’s Department of Justice in 2017 after he fired FBI director James Comey.

“It’s a shame that our country had to go through this. To be honest it’s a shame that your president has had to go through this,” Trump said. “Before I even got elected it began, and it began illegally.”

Trump’s comments could foreshadow an effort by his supporters to seek payback for the cloud that has hung over his time in the White House.

“I’m interested in moving on and trying to get this behind us, but people have to pay for what they’ve done for the past two years,” said former Trump campaign aide David Bossie. “We must investigate the investigators.”

CHALLENGES FOR DEMOCRATS

Trump’s path to re-election remains a perilous one. Analysts say he will probably need to win the Midwestern states of Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin, just as he did in his improbable 2016 victory, and Democrats are already pouring resources into those states.

Trump will foreshadow his campaign message on Thursday night when he headlines a “Make America Great Again” rally in Michigan.

Trump supporters viewed the Mueller report as a blow to the more than a dozen Democrats who are campaigning for their party’s 2020 presidential nomination.

“This is very problematic for any Democrat who’s running for president in 2020 that was hoping they would face a weakened or beaten-down President Trump,” former Trump campaign adviser Jason Miller said. “In fact, President Trump will likely see a ratings boost coming out of this and a strong tailwind pushing him toward the upcoming election.”

Reuters/Ipsos polling has shown that Americans decided early on in Mueller’s investigation whether they thought Trump was guilty of collusion or not. The polling found few undecided voters.

Brinkley said Democrats will need to adjust their tactics and emphasize their differences with Trump’s record on issues ranging from healthcare and climate change to immigration.

“Some of those charges are going to have to rise to be the main charges against Trump,” he said, noting there was fatigue with the Russia issue.

(Reporting By Steve Holland, Jeff Mason and Roberta Rampton; Editing by Ross Colvin and Chris Reese)

Source: OANN

Without a mention of John McCain after breaking from the president's criticism of his late friend, Sen. Lindsey Graham delivered loyalty and laughs in a light-hearted, GOP fundraiser speech Friday as President Donald Trump looked on, Politico reported.

"If Lindsey's speaking, I want to come down here for two reasons," President Trump said, per a video posted by a Politico reporter. "No. 1: He's a great speaker; and No. 2, I know if I'm here, he's not going to say anything bad about me."

The media was shut out of attending the annual Lincoln Day Dinner, a Palm Beach County Republican Party fundraiser, per the report. President Trump had not planned to attend, but he did announce Sen. Graham after having dinner with the first lady Melania and his son Barron, according to attendees.

"We found a lot in common: I like him and he likes him," a jovial Graham joked in a light-hearted speech, those in attendance told Politico.

Among the other one-liners from Graham, who spoke "off the cuff," according to Graham spokesman Kevin Bishop:

  • On hailing the move of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem: "There will be a Trump hotel there in 10 years," he cracked.
  • Graham jokingly asked the crowd if they wanted to see former Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., on the Supreme Court. Gowdy was in attendance and "mingling with the president," according to Politico.
  • After the crowd started a "lock her up" chant about Hillary Clinton, Graham quipped: "Don't lock her up! We want her to run again."

"Pretty typical Lindsey," one attendee told Politico of the 30-minute speech, which President Trump arrived for and left when it was done.

The following from the Trump inner-circle and Florida GOP were in attendance, per the report.

  • Emcee ex-Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.
  • Donald Trump Jr. and girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle.
  • Florida Lt. Gov Jeanette Núñez.
  • Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla.
  • Former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla.
  • Republican National Committee co-chair Tommy Hicks, Jr.
  • Conservative activist James O'Keefe.

One topic that was not broached, as the Mueller report was delivered to the Justice Department, was the Russia investigation.

"Nobody mentioned anything, other than all of us saw our phones and knew the report dropped," an attendee told Politico.

Source: NewsMax Politics

There were some tense moments during an interview President Donald Trump did with Fox Business Network's Maria Bartiromo regarding his continued bashing of the late Sen. John McCain.

Bartiromo sat down with Trump on Thursday for an interview that will air Friday morning. The network released snippets of the interview, including a part about Trump's ongoing feud with McCain — the Republican senator, war hero, and former POW who died last August following a battle with brain cancer.

"You spent a good portion of your time in Ohio the other day trashing John McCain," Bartiromo said. "Sen. John McCain is dead. Why are you doing this?"

Trump replied, "It's not a good portion of my time, it's a very small portion. But if you realize, about three days ago, it came out that his main person gave to the FBI the fake news dossier. It was a fake, it was a fraud, it was paid for by Hillary Clinton and the Democrats. They gave it to John McCain, who gave it to the FBI for very evil purposes. That's not good.

"And the other thing, he voted against repeal and replace [Obamacare]. Now, he's been campaigning for years for repeal and replace. I'm not a fan. After all of this time, think of this. Repeal and replace. We would've had great healthcare."

Bartiromo then pushed back, reiterating the point McCain is no longer living.

"But Mr. President, he's dead. He can't punch back. I know you punch back, but he's dead," she said.

Trump then got more defensive, saying, "I don't talk about it. People ask me the question. I didn't bring this up. You just brought it up. You asked the question."

Bartiromo interjected and replied, "You talked about it this week."

Trump then repeated his point about the press asking him about McCain rather than him bringing up the topic — despite the fact Trump tweeted disparaging remarks about McCain last weekend and also spoke ill of him, unprompted, during a speech Wednesday.

"You asked me the question. When I went out yesterday to the [press] scrum, they asked me the question. When they ask me the question, I answer the question. But you people bring it up, I don't bring it up," Trump told Bartiromo.

"I'm not a fan, he was horrible what he did with repeal and replace. What he did to the Republican Party and to the nation and to sick people that could've had great healthcare was not good. So I'm not a fan of John McCain, and that's fine."

Source: NewsMax Politics

Meghan McCain's co-host on ABC's "The View" on Thursday called President Donald Trump a "pathological liar" and criticized GOP lawmakers who have yet to condemn his attacks on McCain's father, the late Sen. John McCain.

"The reason they are not speaking is because they are spineless, and they are afraid of [Trump]," Ana Navarro said Thursday during the show's opening segment. "Because they think he is like Lord Voldemort and if they mention his name, he will come down and strike them dead politically."

Navarro made her comments after producers played a clip of the president saying, "I gave him the kind of funeral that he wanted. I didn't get a thank you, but that's OK."

Navarro responded: "First of all, John McCain didn't get the funeral that he wanted. He got the funeral that he deserved. He got the funeral that he earned through more than 60 years of service and sacrifice and pain for this country, something that Donald Trump would know nothing about because for more than 70 years it's been all about Trump for him."

Trump and McCain's feud goes back to the 2016 presidential election, but the president has stepped up his attacks on the former Arizona lawmaker over the last week.

Few Republican lawmakers have condemned the president, though Rep. Dan Crenshaw, R-Texas, did urge Trump to stop talking about McCain.

"There is just no reason to be talking about Sen. McCain after he has passed. He is not your political enemy Mr. President," he said.

Source: NewsMax Politics


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