Lindsey Graham

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1. Tension between Attorney General William Barr and Robert Mueller

Barr revealed a split with the special counsel over the pursuit of evidence that President Trump tried to obstruct the probe. Mueller did not draw any conclusion on obstruction, despite gathering the evidence.

“The investigation carried on for a while as additional episodes were looked into,” Barr told the panel. “So my question was, why were those investigated if, at the end of the day, you weren’t going to reach a decision on them?”

Later in the hearing Barr dismissed a March 27 letter from Mueller complaining about Barr’s four-page memo to Congress about the report. “The letter’s a bit snitty and I think it was written by one of his staff people,” Barr told the Senate Judiciary Committee. Mueller served as Barr’s deputy when Barr was President George H.W. Bush’s Attorney General in 1991.

2. Barr didn’t review Mueller’s evidence.

Under questioning from Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., a former prosecutor who is running for president, Barr acknowledged neither he nor Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein reviewed the trove of evidence gathered by the Mueller team before he cleared Trump of any wrongdoing.

“We accepted the statements in the report as a factual record,” Barr told Harris. “We did not go underneath it to see whether or not they were accurate. We accepted it as accurate.”

3. Barr is probing leaks to media.

Under questioning from Republicans on the panel, Barr said he is investigating Department of Justice leaks to the media regarding the investigation into alleged Russian collusion with the Trump campaign.

Dozens of news stories over the past two years have centered on information provided by anonymous law enforcement sources, some of it inaccurate, about the probe and Trump’s involvement with the Russians.

“We have multiple criminal leak investigations underway,” Barr told the panel.

4. Barr is examining the justification for surveillance warrants into Trump campaign.

Barr said he is investigating the basis for the Justice Department’s decision to secretly surveil the Trump campaign beginning in October 2016. Barr said he is working with Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz to determine if a surveillance warrant was properly obtained by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance court the month before the election.

Barr said his probe, “is focused on the basis of the FISA and the handling of the FISA application,” and added it could extend into the prior months, when FBI agents who helped initiate the Trump probe were texting to each other about their disdain for Trump, their desire to stop him from becoming president, and their support of Hillary Clinton.

The FBI obtained a warrant to spy on Trump campaign aide Carter Page on an undisclosed date in October, according to redacted documents released by the Trump administration.

“By necessity, it looks back a little earlier than that,” Barr said of his investigation. “The people I have helping me with my review will be working very closely with Mr. Horowitz.”

5. Senate Judiciary (probably) won’t call Mueller to testify.

Democrats are eager to hear testimony from special counsel Robert Mueller, they said Wednesday. But Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., doesn’t plan to invite him.

“I’m not going to do any more,” Graham said after Barr’s day-long hearing. “Enough already, it’s over.”

Graham said he would make an exception if Mueller wanted to discuss with the panel his phone conversation with Barr last month over Barr’s memo about the 400-plus page report. Democrats say the Senate should subpoena Barr’s notes from the call, which followed a letter from Mueller to Barr complaining about Barr’s memo.

Barr refused to turn over the notes when Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., asked for them.

“I’m going to ask [Mueller] if he wants to come talk about this limited thing,” Graham said. “I’m not going to retry the case.”

Attorney General William Barr on Wednesday dismissed a four-page letter sent by special counsel Robert Mueller complaining about the way Barr characterized his report into Mueller’s Russian collusion probe.

“The letter’s a bit snitty, and I think it was written by one of his staff people,” Barr told the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The letter from Mueller was leaked to the press Tuesday evening, hours before Barr’s critical testimony about the Mueller report before the Judiciary Committee.

The testimony showed a division between Barr and Mueller, who Barr at one point reminded the panel had served many years in the government as “a political appointee” and not a career prosecutor.

Barr said he also disagreed with Mueller’s decision to extend the investigation to probe obstruction without issuing a conclusion on that charge.

Mueller, in a March 27 letter, said Barr’s own four-page summary of Mueller’s findings “did not fully capture the context, nature and substance,” of his report.

Democrats pointed to the Mueller letter to underscore their belief Barr mischaracterized the Mueller report to benefit the president.

Barr refused a request by Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., to turn over his notes of a phone conversation with Mueller about that letter.

“Why should you have them?” Barr said.

Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said he would ask Mueller, “Is there anything about that conversation you disagree with and if there is, you can come and tell us.”

Senate Democrats, led by 2020 White House contender Amy Klobuchar, on Wednesday contested Attorney General William Barr’s conclusion that President Trump did not try to obstruct the Mueller investigation into Russian collusion.

Klobuchar, D-Minn., said the Mueller report outlines incidents where Trump attempted to influence the investigation by attempting to fire the special counsel and coercing witnesses including former campaign chairman Paul Manafort and Trump’s ex-personal lawyer Michael Cohen.

“Look at the pattern here,” said Klobuchar, a former prosecutor, referring to the examples outlined in the Mueller report such as the instance where Trump urged Cohen to “hang in there” and “stay strong.”

Barr disagreed with Klobuchar and said the individual incidents did not qualify as criminal obstruction.

Barr said he believes Trump was urging the witnesses to resist fabricating false evidence against him in order to escape criminal punishment.

“Discouraging flipping in that sense is not obstructing,” Barr said.

Klobuchar said “the totality of the evidence” shows obstruction by Trump.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., said Trump’s effort to remove Mueller is an indication of obstruction and his campaign broke the law when it failed to report Russian attempts to pass along information about Hillary Clinton.

“Whether or not you can make a criminal charge out of this it is unacceptable,” Coons said. “The Russians offered Trump dirt on Hillary Clinton, and they never reported that to the FBI,” Coons said.

Sen. Richard Blumenthal, D-Conn., called on Barr to recuse himself from the remaining open investigations related to the investigation.

Barr refused.

Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, tried to force Barr to reveal whether he believed Trump’s overall behavior during the investigation was “OK” and accused Barr of lying to Congress.

“You seem to think it’s not a crime then, there is no problem, nothing to see here, nothing to worry about,” Hirono said. “Do you think all of the things Trump did are OK?”

“How did we get to this point?” Barr responded.

Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., cut off Hirono and accused her of slandering Barr “from top to bottom.”


‘It was MY baby!’ Bill Barr clashes with Democrats who accuse him of spinning Mueller report as he says decisions about releasing it were all up to him and insists he was RIGHT to clear Trump of obstructing justice

  • Trump’s attorney general told the Senate Judiciary Committee on Wednesday that the Mueller report ‘was my baby’ and he alone decided when to release it 
  • Mueller wrote a letter to Attorney General William Barr on March 27 complaining that Barr’s memo to Congress didn’t capture the report’s nuances 
  • Barr announced on March 24 that Trump had been cleared of obstruction of justice and there was no conspiracy between his campaign and Russia 
  • In response, Mueller wrote to Barr complaining that the memo ‘did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance’ of his 448-page findings
  • He had already written a letter two days earlier, urging Barr to release his own executive summaries immediately 
  • Mueller will have his turn to speak this month, in a House Judiciary Committee hearing, according to Chairman Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat

Attorney General William Barr clashed with Senate Democrats on Wednesday in his first appearance on Capitol Hill since the release of the special counsel’s Russia report, insisting that ‘it was my decision how and when to make it public, not Bob Mueller’s.’

In a tense standoff with Senate Democratic Whip Dick Durbin of Illinois, a combative Barr insisted that a March 27 letter from Mueller asked for quicker public disclosure of his report’s executive summaries wasn’t proof that the special counsel disagreed with a four-page overview Barr had sent a quartet of congressional leaders days earlier.

‘His concern was not the accuracy of the statement of the findings in my letter,’ Barr said, ‘but that he wanted more out there to provide additional context to explain his reasoning on why he didn’t reach a decision on obstruction [of justice].’

‘He wanted more out,’ he said, comparing his situation to that of a judge charged with communicating a jury’s verdict to the public long before publishing a trial transcript.

‘I’m out there saying, “Here is the verdict,” and the prosecutor comes up and taps me on the shoulder and says, “Well, the verdict doesn’t fully capture all my work. How about that great cross-examination I did,” or, “How about that third day of trial where I did that? This doesn’t capture everything”.’ 

‘My answer to that is I’m not trying to capture everything. I’m trying to state the verdict.’  

Attorney General Bill Barr testified Wednesday in a Senate hearing that the special counsel report on Russian election interference was 'my baby' the moment Robert Mueller delivered it, making it his decision alone how much to release and how quickly

Attorney General Bill Barr testified Wednesday in a Senate hearing that the special counsel report on Russian election interference was ‘my baby’ the moment Robert Mueller delivered it, making it his decision alone how much to release and how quickly

Democratic Whip Dick Durbin on Illinois grilled Barr about Mueller's demand for his own redacted versions of his report's executive summaries to be released  immediately upon delivery

Democratic Whip Dick Durbin on Illinois grilled Barr about Mueller’s demand for his own redacted versions of his report’s executive summaries to be released  immediately upon delivery

Barr, shown facing cameras on Wednesday, said he was never trying to summarize Mueller's report, but to tell Americans what the overall 'verdict' was in a brief fashion because of the intensity of public interest in the case

Barr, shown facing cameras on Wednesday, said he was never trying to summarize Mueller’s report, but to tell Americans what the overall ‘verdict’ was in a brief fashion because of the intensity of public interest in the case

Rhode Island Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse sparred with Barr about Mueller's own redacted versions of his summaries; Barr said it wasn't Mueller's job to decide how much to release, and he was operating under his 'supervision'

Rhode Island Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse sparred with Barr about Mueller’s own redacted versions of his summaries; Barr said it wasn’t Mueller’s job to decide how much to release, and he was operating under his ‘supervision’

Mueller will have his turn to speak this month, in a House Judiciary Committee hearing. Chairman Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat, told reporters the special counsel will testify by a date hasn’t been finalized.

Rhode Island Democratic Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse challenged Barr about why he ignored Mueller’s request to immediately release a redacted version of the report summaries, which the special counsel said were scrubbed of most information prohibited from public disclosure.

‘I wasn’t interested in putting out summaries, period,’ Barr replied.

Mueller had written that his own redactions covered the department’s obligations to keep Grand Jury proceedings secret, along with information related to open criminal cases and decisions about targets who wouldn’t be prosecuted.

He didn’t, however, mention the need to protect information that could reveal intelligence agency sources and methods. Barr said Wednesday that ‘there were redactions made in the executive summaries’ by his office.

‘Bob Mueller is the equivalent of a U.S. attorney,’ he said. ‘He was exercising the powers of the attorney general, subject to the supervision of the attorney general. He’s part of the Department of Justice.’ 

‘His work concluded when he sent his report to the attorney general. At that point, it was my baby. And I was making the decision as to whether or not to make it public. I effectively overrode the regulations, used discretion, to lean as far forward as I could to make that public. And it was my decision how and when to make it public. Not Bob Mueller’s.’

Democrat after Democrat accused Barr of spinning the Mueller investigation’s findings in President Donald Trump’s favor, especially by honoring an Office of Legal Counsel opinion that prohibits the Justice Department from charging a sitting president with a crime.

Attorney General William Barr testified in a packed Senate hearing room on Wednesday, his first clash with Congress over the aftermath of the Mueller report

Attorney General William Barr testified in a packed Senate hearing room on Wednesday, his first clash with Congress over the aftermath of the Mueller report

Barr defended his decision, along with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, to stand down on the question of whether President Trump obstructed justice

Barr defended his decision, along with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, to stand down on the question of whether President Trump obstructed justice

Special counsel Robert Mueller (pictured) wrote Barr a letter complaining that his memo to Congress summarizing his Russia investigation and exonerating President Trump of collusion did not fully capture the substance of his report

Special counsel Robert Mueller (pictured) wrote Barr a letter complaining that his memo to Congress summarizing his Russia investigation and exonerating President Trump of collusion did not fully capture the substance of his report

Barr had announced on March 24 that Trump had been cleared of obstruction of justice and there was no conspiracy between his campaign and Russia to interfere in the election

Barr had announced on March 24 that Trump had been cleared of obstruction of justice and there was no conspiracy between his campaign and Russia to interfere in the election

Barr said he pretended the opinion didn’t exist, but acknowledged that Mueller saw it as precluding some of what he might otherwise have been required to do.

Both sides shredded their playbooks Tuesday night with the revelation of the letter Mueller wrote to Barr, complaining that his March 24 memo to Congress announcing Trump would face no legal consequences related to alleged collusion with Russia, and clearing him of obstructing justice, ‘did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance’ of his 448-page findings.

Barr said Mueller told him the four-page memo didn’t misrepresent the larger report, but he wanted his own executive summaries released immediately instead of waiting for the rest of the tome to pass scrutiny of lawyers deciding what could be released to the public. 

Barr said Wednesday that he never thought his four pages to Capitol Hill were a summary of Mueller’s work, but were meant to tell an impatient public the bottom-line findings in the way a judge delivers a verdict.

Mueller, he said, had told him ‘his concern focused on his explanation of why he did not reach a conclusion on obstruction [of justice], and he wanted more put out on that issue.’

‘He was very clear with me that he was not suggesting that we had misrepresented his report,’ Barr said.

But he told senators that he decided it was inappropriate ‘to put out the report piecemeal. I wanted to get the whole report out.’ 

Mueller, angry that Barr hadn't immediately released his executive summaries, wrote to Barr that his four-page letter to Congress was an inadequate top-line summary

Mueller, angry that Barr hadn’t immediately released his executive summaries, wrote to Barr that his four-page letter to Congress was an inadequate top-line summary

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican who is a Trump ally, chaired Wednesday's hearing

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, a South Carolina Republican who is a Trump ally, chaired Wednesday’s hearing

Barr's four-page top-line letter to congressional leaders was released more than three weeks before a redacted version of Mueller's final report was released to the public on April 18

Barr’s four-page top-line letter to congressional leaders was released more than three weeks before a redacted version of Mueller’s final report was released to the public on April 18 

Mueller’s March 27 letter asked Barr to release ‘the introduction and executive summary for each volume’ of his report, and included versions that he said were ‘marked with redactions to remove any information that potentially could be protected by Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e); that concerned declination decisions; or that related to a charged case.’ 

Rule 6(e) concerns secret Grand Jury testimony and the other two groups of information are meant to protect the rights of people who have been investigated and either charged or not charged with crimes. 

‘I am requesting that you provide these materials to Congress and authorize their public release at this time,’ Mueller wrote. 

Deciding what to redact in the report was not Mueller’s responsibility. That fell to Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who also decided the evidence Mueller collected did not rise to the level of a criminal obstruction of justice charge for President Trump.

Mueller’s larger objection was that Barr’s letter to Congress ‘did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance of this office’s work and conclusions.’ 

‘There is now public confusion about critical aspects of the results of our investigation. This threatens to undermine a central purpose for which the Department appointed the Special Counsel: to assure full public confidence in the outcome of the investigations,’ he wrote.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (right) and former chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley (left) led Republican efforts to mute the Democrats' attacks on Wednesday

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham (right) and former chairman Sen. Chuck Grassley (left) led Republican efforts to mute the Democrats’ attacks on Wednesday

Senator Dianne Feinstein the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, grilled Barr

Senator Dianne Feinstein the ranking Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, grilled Barr

Senators Corey Booker (left) and Kamala Harris (right), Democrats on the Judiciary Committee who are running for president, smirked as Barr prepared to testify

Senators Corey Booker (left) and Kamala Harris (right), Democrats on the Judiciary Committee who are running for president, smirked as Barr prepared to testify

House Judiciary Committee Democrats released the letter Wednesday morning, a half-day after The Washington Post obtained a leaked version and published most of it. 

According to Justice Department officials, Barr wanted to issue the report all at once with the redactions – which took several weeks. 

Barr’s four-page top-line letter went to Congress more than three weeks before a redacted version of Mueller’s report was released to the public on April 18. 

Mueller and Barr also spoke by phone after he sent the letter, according to Justice Department officials. 

In the call, Mueller is said to have expressed concerns that the public wasn’t getting an accurate understanding of the investigation. 

Justice Department officials said Barr asked Mueller if he thought the memo was inaccurate and Mueller responded that he didn’t.   

Committee chairmen: The Democratic-controlled House Judiciary Committee, chaired by Jerrold Nadler, is in a stand-off with Bill Barr

Committee chairmen: The Senate Judiciary Committee, chaired by Trump's golf buddy Lindsey Graham, will welcome the attorney general Wednesday

The Democratic-controlled House Judiciary Committee, chaired by Jerrold Nadler, is in a stand-off with Bill Barr, but its Senate equivalent, chaired by Trump ally Lindsey Graham, welcomed the attorney general Wednesday

Barr was sworn in Wednesday morning in the Senate and might testify before a Democrat-led House panel on Thursday

Barr was sworn in Wednesday morning in the Senate and might testify before a Democrat-led House panel on Thursday

Barr is also invited to appear on Thursday before the Democratic-led House Judiciary panel, but the Justice Department said he would not testify if the committee insisted on having its lawyers question the attorney general.

His appearance Wednesday was before a Republican-led committee chaired by a close ally of the president, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, who focused on concerns that the early days of the FBI’s Russia investigation were tainted by law enforcement bias against Trump.   

Tensions on the Senate panel are notable given how Barr breezed through his confirmation process, picking up support from a few Democrats and offering reassuring words about the Justice Department’s independence and the importance of protecting the special counsel’s investigation.

The first hint of discontent surfaced last month when Barr issued his four-page statement about Mueller’s main conclusions. 

Question time: Bill Barr, who last took a tiny number of questions when he unveiled his version of what Mueller's report said just before the full document was published, will appear in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday

Question time: Bill Barr, who last took a tiny number of questions when he unveiled his version of what Mueller’s report said just before the full document was published, will appear in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee Wednesday

In the letter, Barr revealed that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had cleared Trump of obstruction of justice after Mueller and his team found evidence on both sides of the question but didn’t reach a conclusion.

After the letter’s release, Barr raised eyebrows anew when he told a congressional committee that he believed the Trump campaign had been spied on, a common talking point of the president and his supporters. 

He also equivocated on a question of whether Mueller’s investigation was a witch hunt, saying someone who feels wrongly accused would reasonably view an investigation that way. 

That was a stark turnabout from his confirmation hearing, when he said he didn’t believe Mueller would ever be on a witch hunt.

A person familiar with Barr’s thinking has said that Barr, a former CIA employee, did not mean spying in a necessarily inappropriate way and was simply referring to intelligence collection activities. 

The FBI did obtain a secret surveillance warrant in 2016 to eavesdrop on the communications of Carter Page, a former Trump campaign aide.

Then came Barr’s April 18 press conference to announce the release of the Mueller report later that morning.

He repeated about a half dozen times that Mueller’s investigation had found no evidence of collusion between the campaign and Russia, though the special counsel took pains to note in his report that ‘collusion’ was not a legal term and also pointed out the multiple contacts between the campaign and Russia.

In remarks that resembled some of Trump’s own claims, he praised the White House for giving Mueller’s team ‘unfettered access’ to documents and witnesses and suggested the president had the right to be upset by the investigation, given his ‘sincere belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency, propelled by his political opponents, and fueled by illegal leaks.’ 

The hearing give the attorney general his most extensive opportunity to explain the department’s actions, including a press conference held before the report’s release, and for him to repair a reputation bruised by allegations that he’s the president’s protector.

Barr is also invited to appear Thursday before the Democratic-led House Judiciary panel, but the Justice Department said he would not testify if the committee insisted on having its lawyers question the attorney general.

Fifteen shocking revelations from the Mueller report

Robert Mueller’s report is in, and while there is no concrete evidence that President Donald Trump colluded with Russia during his presidential campaign, there is no shortage of shocking revelations. 

Many of these revelations do not involve President Trump directly, but rather the people around him, from his family to his administration.

From Jared Kushner, Paul Manafort and Donald Trump Jr avoiding charges due to their ignorance and Sarah Sanders admitting she supplied false information to the press, to the money Betsy DeVos’ brother fronted to try and get Hillary Clinton‘s emails, here are the 15 most shocking revelations.  

Sarah Sanders provides the press with false information 

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders is seen above holding a press briefing on May 10, 2017

White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders is seen above holding a press briefing on May 10, 2017

The reasoning behind President Trump’s decision to fire James Comey was the focus of the White House press briefing on May 10, 2017. 

Sarah Sanders told the reporters in attendance that the Department of Justice, President Trump and members of Congress on both sides of the aisle had lost confidence in the FBI director. 

Then she took things one step further by stating: ‘[a]nd most importantly, the rank and file of the FBI had lost confidence in their director. Accordingly, the President accepted the recommendation of his Deputy Attorney General to remove James Comey from his position.’

It was then noted by one reporter that a ‘vast majority’ of agents supported Comey, prompting the press secretary to note: ‘Look, we’ve heard from countless members of the FBI that say very different things.’

Sanders later admitted that her comment about speaking to ‘countless members’ of the FBI was a ‘slip of the tongue’, and that the remark about the ‘rank-and-file’ FBI agents losing their confidence in Comey was unfounded and ‘made in the heat of the moment’.

She never informed the press of this ‘slip of the tongue’ or unfounded comment.  

Donald Trump Jr is a mouthpiece for WikiLeaks 

Donald Trump Jr. got a message that read: 'Great to see you and your dad talking about our publications. Strongly suggest your dad tweets this link if he mentions us'

Donald Trump Jr. got a message that read: ‘Great to see you and your dad talking about our publications. Strongly suggest your dad tweets this link if he mentions us’

On October 3, 2016, the WikiLeaks Twitter sent a direct message to Donald Trump Jr  asking ‘you guys’ to share a post that alleged Hillary Clinton ‘had advocated using a drone to target Julian Assange’.

Trump Jr revealed he had already done so, and began to talk about WikiLeaks with increasing frequency.

On October 12 he got another message that read: ‘Great to see you and your dad talking about our publications. Strongly suggest your dad tweets this link if he mentions us.’

He was the given a link to to help in  ‘digging through’ leaked emails, while being told that the organization had ‘just released Podesta emails Part 4.’

Trump Jr shared the link two days later. 

President Trump launches search for Hillary Clinton’s emails 

Multiple individuals were involved in finding 30,000 deleted Clinton emails including former White House strategist Steve Bannon and Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway

Multiple individuals were involved in finding 30,000 deleted Clinton emails including former White House strategist Steve Bannon and Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway

Then-candidate Trump asked those affiliated with his campaign to find the 30,000 deleted emails.

‘Michael Flynn… recalled that Trump made this request repeatedly, and Flynn subsequently contacted multiple people in an effort to obtain the emails. Barbara Ledeen and Peter Smith were among the people contacted by Flynn,’ states the report.

Multiple individuals were soon involved, including former White House strategist Steve Bannon and Counselor to the President Kellyanne Conway.

Ledeen and Smith would often communicate regarding efforts to retrieve the emails, and Smith drafted several emails suggesting he was in contact with Russian hackers.

‘[I]n one such email, Smith claimed that, in August 2016, KLS Research had organized meetings with parties who had access to the deleted Clinton emails, including partieswith ties and affiliations to Russia,’ said the report.

‘The investigation did not establish that Smith was in contact with Russian hackers or that Smith, Ledeen, or other individuals in touch with the Trump Campaign ultimately obtained the deleted Clinton emails.’

Erik Prince funds the vetting of Hillary’s emails 

When emails that may have come from Hillary Clinton needed to be vetted, it was Betsy DeVos’ brother who put up the money to have them examined. 

Barbara Ledeen, whose husband had co-authored a book with General Michael Flynn, had emails that she claimed were from the ‘dark web.’

A tech adviser was needed to authenticate the emails, and so Ledeen started to solicit donations.

Erik Prince agreed to find the operation, which ultimately concluded that the emails were not in fact real.   

Manafort’s lost millions 

Former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is seen at the Republican National Convention, in Cleveland in July 2016

Former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is seen at the Republican National Convention, in Cleveland in July 2016

Paul Manafort did not have many job prospects at the time he came on board to work for the Trump campaign, and was of the belief that taking a role would be ‘good for business’. 

That was a reference to the $2 million he was owed for work he did for questionable operatives in the country that he had not been paid for at that time.

He also hoped that his new job might help him get Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska a visa, and that the man would in turn drop a lawsuit against him. 

And for reasons that are still somewhat unclear, Manafort kept Ukrainian political consultant Konstantin Kilimnik abreast of all developments in the campaign and how Trump was polling.

Robert Mueller goes clubbing 

'In October 2011, Mueller resigned his family's membership from Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia, in a letter that noted that "we live in the District and find that we are unable to make full use of the Club" and that inquired "whether we would be entitled to a refund of a portion of our initial membership fee," which was paid in 1994,' notes the report. Mueller is seen above

‘In October 2011, Mueller resigned his family’s membership from Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia, in a letter that noted that “we live in the District and find that we are unable to make full use of the Club” and that inquired “whether we would be entitled to a refund of a portion of our initial membership fee,” which was paid in 1994,’ notes the report. Mueller is seen above

President Trump wanted Mueller gone in the days following his appointment, and began to toss out potential conflicts 

He pointed out that ‘Mueller had interviewed for the FBI Director position,’ that ‘he had worked for a law firm that represented people affiliated with the President,’ and that he had disputed fees at a Trump golf club he belonged to in Virginia.

That claim was played up, even though the reality of the situation told a much different story.

‘In October 2011, Mueller resigned his family’s membership from Trump National Golf Club in Sterling, Virginia, in a letter that noted that “we live in the District and find that we are unable to make full use of the Club” and that inquired “whether we would be entitled to a refund of a portion of our initial membership fee,” which was paid in 1994,’ notes the report.

‘About two weeks later, the controller of the club responded that the Muellers’ resignation would be effective October 31, 2011, and that they would be “placed on a waitlist to be refunded on a first resigned I first refunded basis.”‘

Hope Hicks hangs up on Putin 

Former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks is seen in this February 2018 photo

Former White House Communications Director Hope Hicks is seen in this February 2018 photo

Hope Hicks received a phone call from a unknown Russian man shortly after President Trump’s victory on election night.

Unsure who it was she instructed the person to email her, but did hear the words ‘Putin call.’ 

She received an email the next morning from Sergey Kuznetsov, an official at the Russian Embassy to the United States, with the subject line ‘Message from Putin.’

The letter congratulated Trump and noted that he was looking forward to the two men working together, but Hicks was afraid to pass it along to her boss.

So she instead decided to email Jared Kushner, asking: ‘Can you look into this? Don’t want to get duped but don’t want to blow off Putin!’

Kushner said the best way to do this would be by contact the ambassador, but was unable to remember his name.

That man was Sergey Kislyak, and within days Kushner and General Flynn were meeting with him at Trump Tower to discuss setting up a secure line between President Trump and Putin.   

President Trump is f***ed 

'Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I' m f***ed.,' said President Trump while slumping in his chair. Trump is pictured above last month

‘Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’ m f***ed.,’ said President Trump while slumping in his chair. Trump is pictured above last month

On May 17, 2017, Robert Mueller was named Special Counsel by Rod Rosenstein.

Notes taken from a meeting that day revealed that when then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions informed President Trump of the news he was less than thrilled about the appointment. 

‘Oh my God. This is terrible. This is the end of my Presidency. I’ m f***ed.,’ said President Trump while slumping in his chair.

‘How could you let this happen, Jeff?’

President Trump then continued to bemoan the news, telling Sessions: “You were supposed to protect me’ and noting: ‘Everyone tells me if you get one of these independent counsels it ruins your presidency.’  

Wise guys Jared Kushner and Donald Trump Jr 

Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner are seen above in a file photo from a book party in 2009

Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr. and Jared Kushner are seen above in a file photo from a book party in 2009

Donald Trump Jr, Jared Kushner and Paul Manafort managed to avoid being charged for violating campaign finance law by not being smart enough to know that they were engaging in unlawful activity.

In summarizing his findings from the infamous June 2016 meeting between members of the Trump campaign and Russian Natalia Veselnitskaya, Robert Mueller wrote that unlawful activity did take place, but the men who broke them were unaware of their illegal actions.

‘On the facts here, the government would unlikely be able to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that the June 9 meeting participants had general knowledge that their conduct was unlawful,’ reads the report.

‘The investigation has not developed evidence that the participants in the meeting were familiar with the foreign-contribution ban or the application of federal law to the relevant factual context.’

‘Even assuming that the promised “documents and information that would incriminate Hillary” constitute a “thing of value” under campaign-finance law, the government would encounter other challenges in seeking to obtain and sustain a conviction,’ wrote Mueller.

He then explained how reasonable doubt would make it hard to convict Don Jr and Kushner.

‘To prove that a defendant acted “knowingly and willfully,” the government would have to show that the defendant had general knowledge that his conduct was unlawful,’ wrote Mueller.

In closing out the reasons why no charges would be pursued, Mueller broke down the potential problems with getting a conviction for the three campaign members.

‘Additionally, in light of the unresolved legal questions about whether giving “documents and information” of the sort offered here constitutes a campaign contribution, Trump Jr. could mount a factual defense that he did not believe his response to the offer and the June 9 meeting itself violated the law,’ wrote Mueller.

‘Given his less direct involvement in arranging the June 9 meeting, Kushner could likely mount a similar defense.’

He then noted: ‘And, while Manafort is experienced with political campaigns, the Office has not developed evidence showing that he had relevant knowledge of these legal issues.’

The Steele dossier lives on 

The dossier prepared by former agent Christopher Steele (seen above) claiming that a compromising tape of President Trump was in the possession of powerful Russians is backed up by Mueller

The dossier prepared by former agent Christopher Steele (seen above) claiming that a compromising tape of President Trump was in the possession of powerful Russians is backed up by Mueller

The dossier prepared by former agent Christopher Steele claiming that a compromising tape of President Trump was in the possession of powerful Russians is backed up by Mueller.

The nature of the tape is unknown, but in October 2016 Michael Cohen receive a message from a Russian businessman by the name of Giorgi Rtskhiladze.

‘Stopped flow of tapes from Russia but not sure if there’s anything else. Just so you know,’ stated that message in part.

Those tapes were ‘rumored to be held by persons associated with the Russian real estate conglomerate Crocus Group, which had helped host the 2013 Miss Universe Pageant in Russia.’ 

Hacking in hours 

On July 27, 2016, Trump appeared at a rally where he stated: ‘Russia, if you’re listening, I hope you’re able to find the 30,000 emails that are missing. I think you will probably be rewarded mightily by our press.’

That was a reference to the emails stored on Clinton’s server. 

It took just five hours for GRU officers to target Clinton’s personal office in an attempt to hack into the system and obtain the emails.

Seth Rich exonerated

The report states once and for all, and without a shadow of a doubt, that murdered DNC worker Seth Rich (pictured) did not help leak emails

The report states once and for all, and without a shadow of a doubt, that murdered DNC worker Seth Rich (pictured) did not help leak emails

The report states once and for all, and without a shadow of a doubt, that murdered DNC worker Seth Rich did not help leak emails. 

‘Beginning in the summer of 2016, Julian Assange and WikiLeaks made a number of statements about Seth Rich, a former DNC staff member who was killed in July 2016,’ states the report. 

‘The statements about Rich implied falsely that he had been the source of the stolen DNC emails.’

Despite this, Assange still used the boy’s death to strongly suggest he was the source of the leaked emails to the cryptic statements he made at the time. 

‘ANNOUNCE: WikiLeaks has decided to issue a US$20k reward for information leading to conviction for the murder of DNC staffer Seth Rich,’ tweeted the WikiLeaks account after his death.

And when asked about his interested in the murder, Assange said: ‘We’re very interested in anything that might be a threat to alleged WikiLeaks sources.’ 

Trump goes silent 

Mueller’s team did not issue a subpoena to force President Trump to give an interview to the special counsel because it would have created a ‘substantial delay’ at a late stage in the investigation. 

President Trump refused an oral interview and provided only written answers for the questions he was willing to answer. 

‘We also assessed that based on the significant body of evidence we had already obtained of the President’s actions and his public and private statements describing or explaining those actions, we had sufficient evidence to understand relevant events and to make certain assessments without the President’s testimony,’ states the report. 

Friends and frenemies 

Trump and his former campaign manager Paul Manafort are seen at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 21, 2016

Trump and his former campaign manager Paul Manafort are seen at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland on July 21, 2016

Mueller said evidence he collected indicates Trump intended to encourage his former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, not to cooperate with the investigation.

There was also evidence that appeared to support the idea that Trump wanted Manafort to believe that he could receive a presidential pardon.

‘During Manafort’s prosecution and when the jury in his criminal trial was deliberating, the President praised Manafort in public, said that Manafort was being treated unfairly, and declined to rule out a pardon,’ notes the report. 

‘After Manafort was convicted, the President called Manafort “a brave man” for refusing to “break” and said that “flipping” “almost ought to be outlawed.’

By contrast, he expressed ‘hostility’ towards General Flynn after learning he was cooperating with the investigation.    

Future charges 

‘Our investigation found multiple acts by the President that were capable of exerting undue influence over law enforcement investigations, including the Russian-interference and obstruction investigations,’ reads the report.

‘The incidents were often carried out through one-on-one meetings in which the President sought to use his official power outside of usual channels. 

‘These actions ranged from efforts to remove the Special Counsel and to reverse the effect of the Attorney General’s recusal; to the attempted use of official power to limit the scope of the investigation; to direct and indirect contacts with witnesses with the potential to influence their testimony.’ 

 

 

Reports that special counsel Robert Mueller is displeased with Attorney General William Barr’s four-page summary of his report underscore he is “immune” to the “grievous sickness” in Washington that President Donald Trump is spreading, former CIA Director John Brennan, a frequent critic of the president, said Wednesday.

“[Trump] is infecting not just the people around him in the White House, but also those public officials who are entrusted with leading the institutions of government that are supposed to protect the American people and the rule of law,” Brennan, now a senior analyst for NBC News, told MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

He added he finds what is being seen from Barr in recent months “appalling,” as he had believed the attorney general would protect the rule of law and the Department of Justice, rather than “acting as Donald Trump’s personal lawyer.”

“I’m not surprised at all that politicians like Lindsey Graham continue to give Donald Trump a pass, but I am surprised not more Republicans are coming and speaking out,” Brennan said. “Fortunately, we have somebody like Bob Mueller, who is immune to the sickness. This country, the future basically rests on Bob Mueller’s ability to continue to speak truth to power and to maintain his integrity in a sea of this sickness.”

However, Brennan said he does not know what Barr has to gain from his stance, other than trying to continue to reinforce his view the president is “almost immune” from prosecution.

Source: NewsMax America

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham on Wednesday opened a hearing about the Mueller report into Russian collusion during the 2016 presidential race by announcing he plans to investigate pro-Clinton law enforcement officials’ targeting of President Trump.

“Once the Mueller report is put to bed, and it will be soon, this committee is going to look long and hard at how all of this started,” Graham, R-S.C., said.

The panel met Wednesday to grill Attorney General William Barr about special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, which Graham and other Republicans say exonerates Trump of wrongdoing.

Democrats believe Trump attempted to obstruct the probe and blocked adequate inquiry into collusion with Russia.

Graham outlined Trump’s willingness to cooperate with Robert Mueller and reviewed the FBI’s probe into Hillary Clinton’s private email server, run by FBI agents who texted about their opposition to Trump and then launched a counterintelligence probe into his campaign.

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham read aloud a text message with the f-word from former FBI agent Peter Strzok during Wednesday’s hearing with Attorney General William Barr.

During his opening remarks, Graham, R-S.C., read off text messages exchanged between Strzok and former FBI lawyer Lisa Page.

One that he read was from October 2016, in which Strzok wrote to Page: “I am riled up. Trump is a fucking idiot, is unable to provide a coherent answer. I can’t pull away. What the fuck happened to our country??!?!”

The thousands of text messages that Strzok and Page, who were having an affair, sent back and forth about the Clinton and Trump-Russia investigations raised questions of bias, and special counsel Robert Mueller eventually removed Strzok from the Russia investigation. Strzok was also fired by the FBI.

Graham read Strzok’s text messages to convey how the person who once led Mueller’s investigation “hated Trump’s guts.”

Barr was appearing before the committee to testify about Mueller’s 22-month investigation on Russian interference in the 2016 election.

FILE PHOTO: U.S. Attorney General William Barr testifies before a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing in Washington
FILE PHOTO: U.S. Attorney General William Barr testifies before a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee hearing on the proposed budget estimates for the Department of Justice in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2019. REUTERS/Erin Scott/File Photo

May 1, 2019

By Andy Sullivan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Attorney General William Barr will face pointed questions on Wednesday about his handling of the special counsel’s report on Russia’s role in the 2016 election when he testifies before Congress amid accusations he misrepresented the document’s findings.

Barr’s appearance will mark the first time a member of President Donald’s Trump administration will be testifying about the contents of Robert Mueller’s report into whether Moscow conspired with the Trump campaign during the 2016 vote and whether the president tried to impede the investigation.

The attorney general, appointed by Trump, will tell Congress on Wednesday it is up to them to figure out what to do with the findings of Mueller’s report, now that the Justice Department has essentially completed its work.

“The exercise of responding and reacting to the report is a matter for the American people and the political process,” Barr will tell members of the Senate Judiciary Committee, according to prepared testimony.

On Tuesday, the Washington Post reported that Mueller had complained about a four-page summary written by Barr, saying in a letter it “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of the investigation’s conclusions.

Democratic lawmakers, already upset at Barr’s handling of the report, reacted furiously to the news report, with Senator Mark Warner saying Barr “has lost all credibility.”

Four Senate Democrats asked the Justice Department’s attorney general in a letter on Tuesday to investigate how Barr had rolled out the report.

Two days after receiving the 448-page report from Mueller on March 22, Barr issued a summary, saying that Mueller did not establish that members of Trump’s campaign conspired with Russia during the 2016 election.

He said Mueller left unresolved the question of whether Trump committed obstruction of justice by impeding the Russia investigation. Barr said he and his deputy, Rod Rosenstein, had determined there was insufficient evidence to establish the president committed obstruction of justice.

The partially redacted report, released on April 18, described in extensive and sometimes unflattering detail how Trump tried to impede the investigation, but it stopped short of concluding the president had committed a crime.

Some Democrats say Barr acted improperly by ruling out obstruction of justice charges against the president and praising the White House in a news conference ahead of the report’s release.

Internally, Democrats are now debating whether the report serves as a suitable basis for impeachment proceedings against Trump.

Republicans, including Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, have questioned whether the FBI overstepped its authority by monitoring aides of the president who were suspected of being Russian agents during the campaign. Barr has said he would look into the matter.

Barr is also due to testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday. Democrats who control the committee and the Justice Department are in disagreement over the format of the hearing.

Democrats want Barr to face extended questioning from staff lawyers once the customary round of questioning by lawmakers is complete, and sit for a closed-door session to discuss redacted portions of Mueller’s report.

The Justice Department objected because witnesses traditionally do not face questions from committee staff.

Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler has also demanded that Barr provide an unredacted version of the report and underlying evidence by 10 a.m. (1400 GMT) on Wednesday. The Justice Department has not said whether it would comply with that request.

(Reporting by Andy Sullivan; Editing by Peter Cooney and Bernadette Baum)

Source: OANN

William Barr

Robert Mueller wrote that Attorney General William Barr’s summary “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of the investigation. | Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Attorney General William Barr’s two-day tightrope walk through congressional hearings just got a lot more perilous.

Hours before he was set to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee — the first of two days of hearings on his handling of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report — news of Mueller’s own dissatisfaction with Barr leaked out.

Story Continued Below

Now, the attorney general will face senators armed with evidence that Mueller believed Barr’s efforts to publicly characterize the findings of his 22-month probe misrepresented the substance of the report and undermined public confidence in the investigation.

In a March 27 letter — just three days after Barr made public a four-page summary of his “principal conclusions” from Mueller’s report — the special counsel expressed concern that Barr’s memo sowed “public confusion about critical aspects of the results of our investigation.”

Mueller also wrote that Barr’s summary “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of the investigation, which centered on links between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia, as well as whether the president obstructed the probe.

The revelation added new fuel to Democrats’ allegations that Barr was trying to spin the results of the Mueller investigation in a favorable light for Trump. Democrats have also charged that Barr misled the public about Mueller’s findings on obstruction of justice — in particular, Mueller’s citation of a longstanding Justice Department policy against indicting a sitting president.

In his opening statement to the Senate, Barr will defend his handling of the investigation, specifically his decision not to charge Trump with obstruction of justice despite the evidence Mueller presented.

Barr says he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein “disagreed” with some of Mueller’s legal theories and believes that some of Trump’s efforts to influence the investigation “did not amount to obstruction as a matter of law.” But he says he “accepted” Mueller’s legal framework, and concluded that the evidence was “not sufficient to establish that the president committed an obstruction-of-justice offense.”

The attorney general also cryptically references the “political process” in his opening statement when discussing what could happen next — a potential acknowledgment of a role for Congress to pick up where Mueller left off.

“From here on, the exercise of responding and reacting to the report is a matter for the American people and the political process,” Barr will say. “As I am sure you agree, it is vitally important for the Department of Justice to stand apart from the political process and not to become an adjunct of it.”

The news of Mueller’s letter echoing some Democrats’ concerns has led them to demand expedited public testimony from the special counsel — a senior House Democratic aide said they hope to hear from him by next week, though they initially had sought his testimony by May 23.

Mueller’s report indicated that investigators lacked enough evidence to charge any Americans with conspiring with Russia’s broad and sophisticated effort to influence the 2016 election. But in a second volume of the report, Mueller laid out devastating details about Trump’s efforts to curtail or constrain Mueller’s probe — including attempts to have subordinates fire Mueller altogether.

Though Mueller concluded that in at least several instances Trump met all the criteria necessary to constitute criminal obstruction of justice, he said he decided against making a final judgment because Justice Department rules prohibit the indictment of a sitting president.

But when Barr revealed Mueller’s decision in March, he added his own analysis of Mueller’s obstruction findings, concluding that there wasn’t sufficient evidence to establish that Trump obstructed justice and later told lawmakers that the DOJ policy about indicting a sitting president was not a factor in Mueller’s calculus.

Barr’s hearing on Wednesday, in front of a committee chaired by Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), may be an easier task than his scheduled Thursday hearing before the Democrat-run House Judiciary Committee. Graham has signaled that he has no qualms about Barr’s handling of Mueller’s report and that he’s convinced Trump did not obstruct justice, despite Mueller’s decision to not make a judgment on the question.

It’s unclear whether Barr will attend Thursday’s House hearing. Aides indicated in recent days that Barr objects to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler’s effort to permit committee lawyers to question Barr directly.

Before Attorney General William Barr testifies before the House Judiciary Committee on Thursday, Chairman Jerry Nadler wants the Justice Department to hand over a letter special counsel Robert Mueller wrote criticizing the four-page summary of his report.

The Washington Post reported Tuesday evening that Mueller wrote to Barr last month to object to his summary because it “did not fully capture the context, nature, and substance” of the 22-month investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible obstruction of justice by President Trump.

The letter is the first known instance of Mueller commenting on Barr’s controversial rollout of his report, which has been heavily criticized by Democrats.

Coupled with a fight over the terms of Thursday’s hearing and the Justice Department’s unwillingness to set a date for Mueller to testify, Nadler, D-N.Y., said the letter confirms his suspicion that Barr sought to spin Mueller’s findings before they were released to the public.

“The Special Counsel was concerned, among other things, that the Attorney General’s mischaracterization ‘threatens to undermine a central purpose for which the Department appointed the Special Counsel: to assure full public confidence in the outcome of the investigations.’ He also requested that the Department release the introduction and executive summaries prepared by the Special Counsel’s team — as I did at the time,” Nadler said in a post to Medium. “The Special Counsel’s concerns reflect our own. The Attorney General should not have taken it upon himself to describe the Special Counsel’s findings in a light more favorable to the President. It was only a matter of time before the facts caught up to him.”

Nadler scolded Barr for withholding the letter from Congress and asked that it be delivered by 10 a.m. Wednesday, the same time Barr’s hearing with the Senate Judiciary Committee is set to begin.

In the summary, Barr said Mueller found no evidence of conspiracy between the Trump campaign and Russia. The summary also said Mueller did not reach a conclusion about whether Trump obstructed justice, adding that Barr and Rosenstein then concluded there was insufficient evidence to establish such a charge. Trump and his allies seized on the summary, claiming the president was completely exonerated.

The Post report said after Mueller sent the letter to Barr, the two talked on the phone. While Mueller said the summary was not inaccurate, he stressed that it was misleading and was being misinterpreted by the media. “After the Attorney General received Special Counsel Mueller’s letter, he called him to discuss it. In a cordial and professional conversation, the Special Counsel emphasized that nothing in the Attorney General’s March 24 letter was inaccurate or misleading. But, he expressed frustration over the lack of context and the resulting media coverage regarding the Special Counsel’s obstruction analysis,” a Justice Department official said.

The letter further escalates a standoff between Nadler and Barr, who were already feuding over the format of Thursday’s House Judiciary Committee hearing. Barr has threatened to pull out in objection to having to answer questions from not only members but also the counsel for each party.

Nadler, who has threatened subpoena action if Barr backs out, remained resolute Thursday evening.

“The Attorney General has expressed some reluctance to appear before the House Judiciary Committee this Thursday. These reports make it that much more important for him to appear and answer our questions. The Department of Justice has also been reluctant to confirm a date for Special Counsel Mueller to testify. Given this evening’s reports, I will press the Department to schedule that hearing without delay,” he said.

Other Democrats have taken to more extreme calls for accountability, namely immediate resignation. “On April 20th, I asked Barr, ‘Did Bob Mueller support your conclusion?’ His answer was, ‘I don’t know whether Mueller supported my conclusion.’ We now know Mueller stated his concerns on March 27th, and that Barr totally misled me, the Congress, and the public. He must resign,” Sen. Chris Van Hollen, D-Md., tweeted.

On the other side of the aisle, Republicans argue their Democratic counterparts are overreacting. Senate Judiciary Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said on Monday that Nadler was going “way over the top” with the terms of Thursday’s hearing. Noting how Mueller found no conspiracy between Trump’s 2016 campaign and the Kremlin, Graham added, “This is political revenge. The House is on a witch hunt — truly a witch hunt to try to make something out of nothing.”

Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a member of the Judiciary Committee, encouraged Barr not to make an appearance unless Democrats relent on the format which he said is a covert way to start impeachment proceedings against Trump. “They are just not calling it that. And the reason they’re not calling it that is because they know it is not justified and they know the American people do not want it. But that is what they are doing and that’s why they want the staff to ask Bill Barr questions because that is how it works in the impeachment process,” Jordan told Fox Business on Tuesday evening.

While Barr’s testimony before the Democrat-led House Judiciary Committee remains in doubt, the fireworks are expected to begin Wednesday morning on the Senate side. Barr hinted at how he will answer pointed questions that are sure to come from Democrats at the end of his prepared remarks. “From here on, the exercise of responding and reacting to the report is a matter for the American people and the political process. As I am sure you agree, it is vitally important for the Department of Justice to stand apart from the political process and not to become an adjunct of it,” Barr will say.


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