Nancy Pelosi

Page: 7

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, meeting with Democrats behind closed doors Wednesday, tamped down the push among some Democrats to launch an impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump.

She stressed the need for patience and pointed to legal battles that she said have already found success in forcing Trump to comply with investigations, according to a person familiar with her remarks.

Speaking to reporters later, Pelosi made it clear she’s not letting Trump off the hook. She said Trump is “engaged in a cover-up.”

Some Democrats urging impeachment say the move would not necessarily be aimed at removing the president, but instead to bolster their position in court as they conduct their investigation.

Pelosi’s remarks to Democrats were described by a person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the person wasn’t authorized to discuss the private meeting.

Source: NewsMax Politics

Hours before President Trump is set to meet with Democratic leaders on funding for an infrastructure deal, White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said congressional Democrats need to figure out their infrastructure priorities before there can be a conversation on how to pay for a plan.

“They don’t even know what infrastructure means to them, so we need to see those things defined before we can put a price tag on it and figure out how to pay for it,” Sanders told reporters on the White House driveway Wednesday morning.

Trump is set to meet with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., at 11:15 a.m. on Wednesday to discuss funding for the plan.

The group also met April 30 and agreed to a $2 trillion figure for an infrastructure deal.

[ Related: House Democrats introduce climate-focused infrastructure bill with $33B for renewables]

Republicans and Democrats have so far been unable to agree on a payment method, however, with many Democrats favoring a federal gas tax increase and some Republicans preferring a tax on vehicle miles traveled. Trump has previously endorsed a 25-cent gas tax hike, but then said last Friday that Democrats were playing “a little bit of a game” in trying to convince him to raise the gas tax.

And on Tuesday night, Trump cast further doubt on prospects for Wednesday’s meeting in a letter to Pelosi and Schumer that insisted the passage of the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, the administration’s replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement, must come before an infrastructure deal.

“Before we get to infrastructure, it is my strong view that Congress should first pass the important and popular USMCA trade deal,” Trump wrote. “Once Congress has passed USMCA, we should turn our attention to a bipartisan infrastructure package.”

Pelosi and Schumer responded in a joint press statement Wednesday evening.

[ Opinion: For infrastructure funding, follow the money on the Coca-Cola highway]

“On Wednesday, we look forward to hearing the President’s plan for how to pay for this package,” the leaders wrote.

Sanders said Democrats were divided over infrastructure and needed to decide what they wanted in the deal.

“We also need Democrats to decide what infrastructure means to them,” Sanders said. “It can’t mean everything that exists. Infrastructure has to be defined. We need to know what their priorities are and what they want to see done, whether it’s really going to be about rebuilding our crumbling roads and bridges, whether it’s about expanding broadband, or whether it’s some of these crazy Green New Deal proposals. They have a divide within their own party.”

House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn, D-S.C., said Democrats should keep plugging along conducting oversight on President Trump and hold off on opening an impeachment inquiry.

“The vast majority would, in fact, support impeachment, just not now,” Clyburn said during an interview with CNN’s John Berman Wednesday morning. “The issue now is whether or not that is something that should be done today or tomorrow, or whether or not we go through a process by which we build a foundation upon which to successfully impeach the president.”

“So that’s where we are. We are all looking forward to the day when that might be ripened,” Clyburn said. “We have not gotten there yet. That is the difference between the majority of the caucus right now and the very strong minority who would like to see us move forward with impeachment right away.”

Clyburn said Democrats have had multiple successes in recent days, citing “victories” including Michigan Republican Rep. Justin Amash’s comments arguing that Trump committed impeachable offenses during special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation. Clyburn said these successes were the result of multiple committees conducting oversight on the president’s actions and dealings.

“We got there by steady, focused movement in the direction of getting at the facts as to whether or not this president did, in fact, break the law. So why don’t we keep doing it?” Clyburn said.

Although Clyburn said he was more interested in launching an impeachment inquiry than he was several weeks ago, he said he doesn’t believe “we ought to pull the trigger on that.”

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has rejected attempts from her party to move forward with an impeachment inquiry.

The New York Times reports she is holding a meeting with lawmakers Wednesday morning to discuss status and strategy of House investigations, and that she is receptive to using legislation to push Trump to cooperate with Congress’ oversight.

President Donald Trump early Wednesday declared that his poll numbers would be much higher if it was not for special counsel Robert Mueller’s “illegal witch hunt” investigation into him and Russian interference into the 2016 presidential election.

“Without the ILLEGAL Witch Hunt, my poll numbers, especially because of our historically “great” economy, would be at 65%,” Trump tweeted. “Too bad! The greatest Hoax in American History.”

According to a Quinnipiac University National Poll released Tuesday, just 38%  approve of Trump’s overall job performance, compared to 41%  who approved of him in a May 2 poll. In addition, 71% said they rate the economy as excellent or good, but just 48% approved of how Trump handles the economy.

Earlier Wednesday morning, Trump posted several tweets complaining that Democrats had contributed to “two years of an expensive and comprehensive Witch Hunt” and that they now want a “DO OVER. In other words, the Witch Hunt continues.”

The tweets come as more Democrats call for impeachment proceedings to begin after Trump blocked his former White House lawyer from testifying before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who prefers a more methodical approach to Trump, will meet with a small group of the House Democratic caucus to discuss strategy, as Democrats are pushing her and other leaders to act on impeachment.

Source: NewsMax Politics

More Democrats are calling — and more loudly — for impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump after his latest defiance of Congress by blocking his former White House lawyer from testifying.

A growing number of rank-and-file House Democrats, incensed by former counsel Don McGahn’s empty chair in the Judiciary Committee hearing room on Tuesday, are confronting House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and pushing her and other leaders to act. Their impatience is running up against the speaker’s preference for a more methodical approach , including already unfolding court battles.

Pelosi summoned some of them — still a small fraction of the House Democratic caucus — to a meeting of investigators on Wednesday to assess strategy.

Trump on Wednesday repeated his mantra about Democrats contributing to a “Witch Hunt” against him.

“Everything the Democrats are asking me for is based on an illegally started investigation that failed for them, especially when the Mueller Report came back with a NO COLLUSION finding,” he tweeted in the first of a series of posts. “Now they say Impeach President Trump, even though he did nothin wrong, while they ‘fish!'”

“After two years of an expensive and comprehensive Witch Hunt, the Democrats don’t like the result and they want a DO OVER. In other words, the Witch Hunt continues!” he said in another tweet.

“The Democrats are getting ZERO work done in Congress,” he added. “PRESIDENTIAL HARASSMENT!” he concluded.

Some Democratic leaders, while backing Pelosi, signaled that a march to impeachment may become inevitable.

“We are confronting what might be the largest, broadest cover-up in American history,” Majority Leader Steny Hoyer told reporters. If a House inquiry “leads to other avenues including impeachment,” the Maryland Democrat said, “so be it.”

Reps. Joaquin Castro of Texas and Diana DeGette of Colorado added their voices to the impeachment inquiry chorus.

“There is political risk in doing so, but there’s a greater risk to our country in doing nothing,” Castro said on Twitter. “This is a fight for our democracy.”

Tweeted DeGette: “The facts laid out in the Mueller report, coupled with this administration’s ongoing attempts to stonewall Congress, leave us no other choice.”

One Republican congressman, Justin Amash of Michigan, has called for impeachment proceedings. He said Tuesday he thinks other GOP lawmakers should join him — but only after reading special counsel Robert Mueller’s report carefully.

Republican House leader Kevin McCarthy dismissed Amash as out of step with House Republicans and “out of step with America.” And Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina said wryly of Amash’s position, “I don’t think it’s going to be a trend-setting move.”

As Democrats weigh their options, Trump is almost taunting them by testing the bounds of executive power in ways few other administrations have. The White House contends that even former employees like McGahn do not have to abide by subpoenas from Congress.

A short time later House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler issued subpoenas for more Trump administration officials — former White House communications director Hope Hicks and Annie Donaldson, a former aide in the White House counsel’s office — for documents and testimony.

Trump’s former White House counsel is the most-cited witness in Mueller’s Trump-Russia investigation report, recounting the president’s attempts to interfere with the probe. And that makes his silence all the more infuriating for Democrats.

Nadler gaveled open Tuesday’s hearing with a stern warning that McGahn will be held in contempt for failing to appear.

“Our subpoenas are not optional,” Nadler said. “We will not allow the president to stop this investigation.”

However, Rep. Doug Collins, the ranking Republican on the committee, spoke scornfully of Nadler’s position, calling the session a “circus” and saying the chairman preferred a public “fight over fact-finding.”

Democrats are “trying desperately to make something out of nothing,” Collins said, in the aftermath of Mueller’s report.

A lawyer for McGahn had said he would follow the president’s directive and skip Tuesday’s hearing, leaving the Democrats without yet another witness — and a growing debate within the party about how to respond.

Nadler said the committee would vote to hold McGahn in contempt, though that’s not expected until June, after lawmakers return from the Memorial Day recess.

Democrats are encouraged by an early success in the legal battles , a Monday ruling by a federal judge against Trump on in a financial records dispute with Congress. Trump’s team filed notice of appeal on Tuesday.

But Pelosi’s strategy hasn’t been swift enough for some lawmakers. In particular, several members of the Judiciary panel feel they must take the lead in at least launching impeachment proceedings.

They say a formal impeachment inquiry could give Democrats more standing in court, even if they stop short of a vote to remove the president.

“I think that’s something a lot of members of the committee — and more and more members of the caucus — think is necessary,” said Rep. Steve Cohen of Tennessee. “I think an inquiry, as the Senate Watergate hearings were, would lead the public to see the misdeeds of this administration.”

Others, though, including some from more conservative districts, said they prefer the step-by-step approach.

“We want to make sure that we’re following all the legal processes, everything we’ve been given, to truly make the best decisions,” said Rep. Lucy McBath of Georgia, a freshman on the Judiciary panel.

Pelosi scheduled Wednesday’s meeting with lawmakers from the Judiciary and Oversight committees after some members confronted her during a meeting among top Democrats Monday evening.

At that time, Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland led others in arguing that an impeachment inquiry would consolidate the Trump investigations and allow Democrats to keep more focus on their other legislative work, according to people familiar with the private conversation who requested anonymity to discuss it.

Pelosi pushed back, saying that several committees are doing investigations already and noting that Rep. Elijah Cummings of Maryland, the chairman of the Oversight Committee, already had won the early court battle over Trump’s financial documents.

With a 235-197 Democratic majority, Pelosi would likely find support for starting impeachment proceedings, but it could be a tighter vote than that margin suggests. Some lawmakers say voters back home are more interested in health care and the economy. Many come from more conservative districts where they need to run for re-election in communities where Trump also has support.

For Pelosi, it’s a push-pull exercise as she tries to raise awareness about Trump’s behavior without moving toward impeachment unless she knows the public is with Congress.

“We’ve been in this thing for almost five months and now we’re getting some results,” Pelosi told lawmakers Monday night. “We’ve always said one thing will lead to another as we get information.”

But other Democrats in the meeting, several of whom have spoken publicly about a need to be more aggressive with Trump, are increasingly impatient. They include Reps. David Cicilline of Rhode Island, Ted Lieu of California and freshman Joe Neguse of Colorado.

“We’re in a very grave moment,” said Rep. Madeleine Dean of Pennsylvania, and “probably right now are left, with nothing but that we must open an inquiry.”

Tweeted Rep. Veronica Escobar of Texas: Congress has made “accommodation after accommodation. I don’t think we should wait any longer.”

Source: NewsMax Politics

 Nancy Pelosi may be forced into pursuing impeachment against Trump: Do You Think That’s Wise?

Pelosi facing increasing pressure to support impeaching Trump
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is scheduled to have a special caucus-wide meeting of House Democrats on Wednesday morning as she faces growing calls within her party to impeach President Trump. Prior meetings involving Pelosi and top Democrats have escalated into heated exchanges, with the party torn over how to address Trump See More controversies. Pelosi has been reluctant to support impeachingTrump and has warned Democrats that impeachment could distract from the focus needed to win in the 2020 presidential election.

The House speaker has also warned colleagues that voters may not support impeaching Trump and that the party could suffer voter backlash if Trump was ultimately acquitted in the Republican-led Senate. Still, former White House counselDonald McGahn’s refusal, on Trump’s orders, to appear at a hearing before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday has escalated tension between congressional Democrats and the Trump administration. A growing number of Democrats say they are dealing with a “lawless president” and that impeachment, not numerous investigations, may be the only way to hold the president accountable.

Joe Frontrunner versus ‘Crazy Uncle Joe’ 
Joe Biden might be leading the race for his party’s nomination now, but the former vice president is a “walking time bomb” and has to perform a “high-wire act” if he is to emerge from the crowded Democratic field in first place, according to Brit Hume, Fox News’ senior political analyst. “I like Biden on a personal basis, but I think he is a walking time bomb,” Hume said. “I think his age is an issue, I’m the same age as he is, my age is an issue, I think his is too… the filters don’t work as well, the memory isn’t as sharp. Hume made the comment while discussing Biden’s 2020 prospects on the latest episode of the Fox News podcast, “The Candidates with Bret Baier.”

Dozens of tornadoes slam the Midwest
Dozens of storms and tornadoes in the Midwest on Tuesday damaged multiple buildings — including a racetrack grandstand –but were expected to weaken by Wednesday. Missouri and parts of Illinois already have been hit with severe weather in the second consecutive day of severe storms and were blamed for at least two deaths. St. Louis was largely spared from the powerful stormsystem, but baseball’s St. Louis Cardinals called off their Tuesday game against their cross-state rivals, the Kansas City Royals, as the rumbling of an approaching storm could be heard downtown. The city’s Lambert Airport shut down for an hour Tuesday butresumed flights a short time later.

Beverly Hills tobacco ban advances
The exclusive community of Beverly Hills, Calif., took a step Tuesday toward becoming the first city in the United States to ban the sale of tobacco products. The city council approved an ordinance that would ban the sale of cigarettes, cigars and other tobacco products at all retail locations within the tony Southern California city, including gas stations, convenience stores, pharmacies and newsstands. However, hotels and several high-end cigar lounges — including the Grand Havana Room, Arnold Schwarzenegger’s favorite cigar club – would be exempt from the rule. The second reading and final vote on the ordinance is expected to take place in early June. If passed, the ordinance will be reviewed by the council in three years. Beverly Hills wasn’t the only place to make history Tuesday: Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee signed a bill into law that allows the composting of human bodiesas an alternative to burials and cremations.

Cannes film poster depicts decapitated Trump
A B-movie poster courted controversy at the Cannes Film Festival’s Market by featuring a bikini-clad woman resembling first lady Melania Trump holding two decapitated heads — one of them a President Trump-like character wearing a “Make America Great Again” cap. The poster, for a 90-minute sci-fi thriller called “When Women Rule the World,” featured the tagline: “Meet the first lady of the future with her HEADS OF STATE!” The film was being promoted at the Cannes Market, part of the international film festival held each May in France.

TODAY’S MUST-READS
Beto O’Rourke peddles false claimthat Trump called asylum-seekers ‘animals.’
AOC says growing this vegetablein community gardens is ‘colonial.’
Whitney Houston may go on touras a hologram.

MINDING YOUR BUSINESS
Trump prepares another round of farmer aid as US-China trade tensions escalate.
GM, Ford are shrinking their workforces. Here’s why.
Retail Apocalypse: These big retailers closing stores, filing for bankruptcy.

Follow @PeterBoykin on Social Media

Twitter: Banned

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Gays4Trump

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/peterboykin/

Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/PeterBoykin

Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/user/peterboykin

Telegram: https://t.me/PeterBoykin
https://t.me/RealPeterBoykin
Parler: https://parler.com/profile/peterboykin/posts

PolitiChatter: https://politichatter.com/PeterBoykin

Gab: https://gab.com/peterboykin

Discord: https://discordapp.com/invite/pyuPqU9

Periscope: Banned

Support Peter Boykin’s Activism by Donating

Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/peterboykin

PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/magafirstnews

Cash App: https://cash.me/app/CJBHWPS
Cash ID: $peterboykin1

Listen to #MagaOneRadio

https://magaoneradio.net/

Join the #MagaNetwork

https://themaganetwork.com/

Read the Latest #MagaFirstNews

https://peterboykin.com/
https://magafirstnews.com/
https://magaone.com/
https://us1anews.com/

Support Donald Trump

https://magagala.org/
http://trumploveswinning.com/
https://marchfortrump.net/
https://gaysfortrump.org/

Join Our Groups on Facebook:

MarchForTrump
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MarchForTrump2020/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MarchForTrump/

MagaOneRadio

https://www.facebook.com/groups/MAGAOneRadio/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MagaOneRadioNet/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MAGARadio/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MagaFirstRadio/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MAGA1Radio/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MagaFirst/

TheMagaNetwork
https://www.facebook.com/groups/theMagaNetwork/

GaysForTrump
https://www.facebook.com/groups/gaysfortrump/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheGayRight/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/LGBTexit/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/gaysfortrumporg/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/DeplorableGays/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/GaysForTrumpParty/

Americans With Trump
https://www.facebook.com/groups/AmericansWithTrump/

North Carolina MAGA Network
https://www.facebook.com/groups/northcarolinamaganetwork/

NC Trump Club
https://www.facebook.com/groups/NCTRUMPCLUB/

Exit Extremism
https://www.facebook.com/groups/EXITEXTREMISM/

Vote For DJ Trump
https://www.facebook.com/groups/VoteForDJTrump/

Trump Loves Winning
https://www.facebook.com/groups/TrumpLovesWinning/

Straights For Trump
https://www.facebook.com/groups/StraightsForTrump/

US1ANews
https://www.facebook.com/groups/US1ANews/
https://www.facebook.com/groups/US1ANewsGroup/

MyNCGOP
https://www.facebook.com/groups/MyNCGOP/

Grab them by the P***Y
https://www.facebook.com/groups/GrabThemByTheP/

Join Our Pages on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/TheMAGANetwork/

https://www.facebook.com/MAGAFIRSTNEWS/

https://www.facebook.com/pg/MagaOneRadio-778327912537976/

https://www.facebook.com/North-Carolina-MAGA-Network-307617209916978/

https://www.facebook.com/GaysForTrumpOrg/

https://www.facebook.com/LGBTExit-2340621102644466/

https://www.facebook.com/Take-Back-Pride-American-Pride-Rally-386980035391880/

https://www.facebook.com/PeterBoykinMAGA/

https://www.facebook.com/MarchForTrumpUSA/

https://www.facebook.com/VoteForDJTrump/

https://www.facebook.com/US1ANews1/

https://www.facebook.com/MYNCGOP/

https://www.facebook.com/trumploveswinning/

Contact Email:
Peter.Boykin@TheMagaNetwork.com
PeterBoykin@Gmail.com
GaysForTrump@Gmail.com
MagaFirstNews@Gmail.com

Telephone Number:
1-202-854-1320

Source

Splits within the Democratic caucus are restraining any momentum to force a House vote on President Trump’s U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement on trade.

The White House, Canada, and Mexico have all acted in recent weeks to address various lawmakers’ demands, but some Democrats are insisting on further changes. As a consequence, there hasn’t been an increase in pressure on Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to schedule a vote.

A House Democratic staffer said that Democrats from heavily agricultural districts were inclined to support a vote, while ones from strong union districts were leaning against it. “We’ve got our own tug-of-war inside the caucus on this,” the staffer said.

Democrats are trying to iron out those differences, but they are making progress only slowly, Rep. Jim Acosta, D-Calif., told the Washington Examiner. “I would like to see a vote before the August break, but there are still some issues that need to be addressed,” Acosta said.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has been meeting with the speaker and other House Democrats to discuss their holdups. Acosta, a centrist, pro-trade Democrat, said that he’d met Lighthizer five times in two months.

The outstanding issues dividing Democrats are ensuring that Mexico abides by changes to its labor laws and keeping prices for pharmaceuticals in check.

The Trump administration addressed one major congressional hang-up about the deal Friday by exempting Canada and Mexico from tariffs on steel and aluminum. Canada and Mexico responded on Monday by removing the tariffs that they had enacted on U.S. products last year in retaliation. Many lawmakers had balked at holding a vote on USMCA until the tariffs, which they argued were doing more harm than good to the U.S. economy, had been lifted.

Last month, Mexico ratified changes to its labor laws to bring them in line with what Democrats, including Pelosi, had demanded as part of the USMCA deal.

Those two changes were meant to boost USMCA’s odds in Congress, especially in the Democrat-led House. But House Majority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., told reporters Tuesday that they were still not near a vote. “As you know, organized labor says it would like to get to yes, we say we’d like to get to yes,” he said. “Mexico has acted but we need enforcement.”

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Colin Peterson, D-Minn., who backs USMCA, said in a statement Friday following the removal of the metals tariffs that “I hope this means we can move toward trade deals that stop the harm to the rural economy and restore the export markets for our farmers and ranchers.” He stopped short of calling for a vote.

The Democratic aide said that one issue holding up a vote is that the administration has yet to formally submit the USMCA deal to Congress. This has made it harder to put it on the speaker’s agenda. Under Trade Promotion Authority, the law covering congressional approval of trade deals, the House must vote within 60 days of a deal being submitted for it to be ratified. Trump could test Democrats’ opposition to the deal by forcing the issue.

On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that Pelosi had recently told Lighthizer that more time was needed to fix address the remaining issues. She agreed to assign lawmakers to working groups to work with Lighthizer to try to work through them.

Frustrated Republicans accused the speaker of slow-walking the trade deal. “Why is Speaker Pelosi holding this up? Let’s do whats right for Hoosiers, and ALL Americans,” tweeted Rep. Greg Pence, R-Ind.

Splits within the Democratic caucus are restraining any momentum to force a House vote on President Trump’s U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement on trade.

The White House, Canada, and Mexico have all acted in recent weeks to address various lawmakers’ demands, but some Democrats are insisting on further changes. As a consequence, there hasn’t been an increase in pressure on Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., to schedule a vote.

A House Democratic staffer said that Democrats from heavily agricultural districts were inclined to support a vote, while ones from strong union districts were leaning against it. “We’ve got our own tug-of-war inside the caucus on this,” the staffer said.

Democrats are trying to iron out those differences, but they are making progress only slowly, Rep. Jim Acosta, D-Calif., told the Washington Examiner. “I would like to see a vote before the August break, but there are still some issues that need to be addressed,” Acosta said.

U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has been meeting with the speaker and other House Democrats to discuss their holdups. Acosta, a centrist, pro-trade Democrat, said that he’d met Lighthizer five times in two months.

The outstanding issues dividing Democrats are ensuring that Mexico abides by changes to its labor laws and keeping prices for pharmaceuticals in check.

The Trump administration addressed one major congressional hang-up about the deal Friday by exempting Canada and Mexico from tariffs on steel and aluminum. Canada and Mexico responded on Monday by removing the tariffs that they had enacted on U.S. products last year in retaliation. Many lawmakers had balked at holding a vote on USMCA until the tariffs, which they argued were doing more harm than good to the U.S. economy, had been lifted.

Last month, Mexico ratified changes to its labor laws to bring them in line with what Democrats, including Pelosi, had demanded as part of the USMCA deal.

Those two changes were meant to boost USMCA’s odds in Congress, especially in the Democrat-led House. But House Majority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md., told reporters Tuesday that they were still not near a vote. “As you know, organized labor says it would like to get to yes, we say we’d like to get to yes,” he said. “Mexico has acted but we need enforcement.”

House Agriculture Committee Chairman Colin Peterson, D-Minn., who backs USMCA, said in a statement Friday following the removal of the metals tariffs that “I hope this means we can move toward trade deals that stop the harm to the rural economy and restore the export markets for our farmers and ranchers.” He stopped short of calling for a vote.

The Democratic aide said that one issue holding up a vote is that the administration has yet to formally submit the USMCA deal to Congress. This has made it harder to put it on the speaker’s agenda. Under Trade Promotion Authority, the law covering congressional approval of trade deals, the House must vote within 60 days of a deal being submitted for it to be ratified. Trump could test Democrats’ opposition to the deal by forcing the issue.

On Tuesday, Bloomberg reported that Pelosi had recently told Lighthizer that more time was needed to fix address the remaining issues. She agreed to assign lawmakers to working groups to work with Lighthizer to try to work through them.

Frustrated Republicans accused the speaker of slow-walking the trade deal. “Why is Speaker Pelosi holding this up? Let’s do whats right for Hoosiers, and ALL Americans,” tweeted Rep. Greg Pence, R-Ind.

Senate Minorrity Leader Schumer departs following meeting with Congressional leaders and Trump administration officials on Capitol Hill in Washington
U.S. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) walks past reporters outside House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office as he departs following a meeting between Congressional leaders and Trump administration representatives on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., May 21, 2019. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

May 21, 2019

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The two top Democrats in Congress said on Tuesday that talks with Republican lawmakers and White House officials on federal spending were “productive.”

“We look forward to continuing to meet to discuss how we can best address the needs of hard-working families, as we again work across the aisle to avert sequestration,” U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer said in a joint statement.

(Reporting by Eric Beech; Editing by David Alexander)

Source: OANN

U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks during the town hall meeting in the Queens borough of New York City
U.S. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) speaks during the town hall meeting in the Queens borough of New York City, New York, U.S., April 27, 2019. REUTERS/Jeenah Moon

May 21, 2019

By Susan Cornwell

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Democratic Representative Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez said on Tuesday it is time for Democratic leaders to allow an impeachment process to start against President Donald Trump, saying the administration’s obstruction of lawmakers’ oversight efforts gives them no choice.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has so far resisted calls for Democrats to launch impeachment proceedings, instead backing continued investigations of Trump and his administration by numerous congressional panels instead.

But more Democrats are openly discussing it, and liberals like Ocasio-Cortez, a leader of the progressive left since she beat an established Democrat in a surprise primary upset last year, are stepping up the pressure.

“I think it’s time for us to, at the very least, open an impeachment inquiry … we’ve been given no choice I think, in this scenario,” Ocasio-Cortez said outside the House of Representatives.

She said the Mueller report on Russian meddling in the 2016 campaign had described evidence of obstruction of the investigation by the executive branch, adding that the report had pointed directly to Congress as the body to take action.

The report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller stopped short of declaring that the president obstructed justice, but it also did not exonerate him.

“We now have the president actively discouraging witnesses from coming in to answer a legally binding subpoena from Congress,” Ocasio-Cortez added. Former White House counsel Don McGahn on Tuesday defied a subpoena from the House Judiciary Committee, at the White House’s request.

“It’s getting to the point where we can’t even do our own jobs. And I think it is entirely appropriate, given this overwhelming amount of evidence and the continued actions from the executive branch, that we exert our power as a co-equal branch of government,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

She said she was not sure whether impeachment advocates were a majority of the Democrats in the House, but “I personally have not felt a very strong opposition to impeachment.”

Another Democratic lawmaker, Representative John Yarmuth, said on Tuesday he believed Pelosi realizes events are trending in the direction of impeachment, even as the Democratic leader argues for continued focus on House investigations of the Trump administration.

Pelosi listened as advocates of impeachment spoke at a Monday night meeting with senior Democrats, Yarmuth said.

“I think she realizes that the path is leading more and more inevitably toward an impeachment process. But she wants to let all these committees do their thing,” Yarmuth said outside the House.

(Reporting by Susan Cornwell; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

Source: OANN


[There are no radio stations in the database]