suspended

FILE PHOTO: The Citigroup Inc logo is seen at the SIBOS banking and financial conference in Toronto
FILE PHOTO: The Citigroup Inc (Citi) logo is seen at the SIBOS banking and financial conference in Toronto, Ontario, Canada October 19, 2017. Picture taken October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Helgren

March 23, 2019

HONG KONG (Reuters) – Citigroup Inc has fired eight bankers and suspended three others from its equities trading desk in Hong Kong after an internal probe revealed misconduct in their dealings with clients, people with knowledge of the matter said.

The action was taken after a review raised concerns related to the accuracy of disclosure to clients by the involved sales traders on some transactions where Citi was acting in a principal capacity, one of the people said.

Principal trade refers to a brokerage acting as the counterparty to settle deals with clients, instead of just broking a securities transaction between different parties.

“A review of Hong Kong-based cash equities execution identified personal conduct that did not meet our standards and we have taken appropriate action,” the U.S. bank said in a statement to Reuters on Saturday.

“Instances where the capacity in which Citi was acting was not accurately represented were detected in relation to facilitation trading,” it said.

The names of the traders against whom actions were taken were not immediately known.

Citi said it was fully compliant with relevant local regulations, and “enhanced regional procedures and controls for facilitation trading” had been introduced to ensure complete transparency.

The bank, which has a large presence in markets, corporate and investment banking businesses in Asia, said its clients had been notified about the development and a team was in place to ensure minimal disruption at the start of trading on Monday.

Bloomberg first reported the development on Friday.

Global banks have been beefing up compliance procedures in Hong Kong, as the securities regulator in the Asian financial hub has stepped up its crackdown against failures to comply with guidelines for equities trading and underwriting functions.

Last week, the regulator banned UBS from leading IPOs in the city for a year, while fining it and rivals, including Morgan Stanley, a combined $100 million for due diligence failures on a series of stock listings.

(Reporting by Anshuman Daga and Sumeet Chatterjee; Editing by Tom Hogue)

Source: OANN

Malaysia's new government advisor Daim Zainuddin speaks during a meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing
Malaysia’s new government advisor Daim Zainuddin speaks during a meeting with Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Beijing, China Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Andy Wong/Pool/via Reuters

March 23, 2019

KUALA LUMPUR (Reuters) – Malaysia will finalize talks with China in early April regarding a $20 billion rail project that has been suspended since July last year, the Malaysian representative for the negotiations said late on Friday.

The renegotiations could result in cost savings of more than 10 billion ringgit ($2.5 billion) for Malaysia, the country’s envoy for the discussions, Daim Zainuddin said in an interview with a local television station.

China representatives have extended an invitation to Malaysia for a visit on April 2 to conclude negotiations on the East Coast Rail Link (ECRL) in the first week of next month.

“They were here two weeks ago in talks with me, and they have invited me to China … to finalize talks,” Daim said.

Daim said the renegotiations could include commercial elements that would benefit Malaysia but did not elaborate.

The ECRL had been threatened by cancellation since Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, who came into power in May last year, vowed to renegotiate or cancel what he calls “unfair” Chinese projects authorized by his predecessor Najib Razak.

Hit by ballooning costs, lack of transparency and the risk it could saddle Malaysia with uncomfortably large debt, the project that was launched in 2017 has come to symbolize Najib’s scandal-ridden administration.

In January, ministers flip-flopped on Malaysia’s decision about the ECRL – the centerpiece of China’s infrastructure push in Southeast Asia – first saying it was canceled and then announcing that talks were still ongoing.

Reuters reported in January, citing sources, that China had offered to nearly halve the cost to save the 688-km (430-mile) rail project.

(Reporting by Liz Lee)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: PGA: Genesis Open - First Round
FILE PHOTO: February 14, 2019; Pacific Palisades, CA, USA; Robert Garrigus hits from the tenth hole tee box during the first round of the Genesis Open golf tournament at Riviera Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports/File Photo

March 22, 2019

(Reuters) – American golfer Robert Garrigus has been suspended for three months by the PGA Tour after testing positive for marijuana.

Garrigus, who has spoken about overcoming addiction to play on the tour, confirmed on his Twitter account on Friday that he had been suspended.

“After a long period of sobriety, I had a relapse and subsequently failed a drug test for marijuana,” he wrote.

He added, while marijuana is legal in a number of U.S. states, it does not “mean there aren’t potentially severe consequences if you use it.”

Ranked 450th in the world, Garrigus, 41, won his only PGA Tour event in 2010.

The Phoenix resident has played in seven tournaments during the 2018-19 season, tying for 20th in the Sanderson Farms Championship.

(Reporting by Gene Cherry in Raleigh, North Carolina; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

Athletics - Diamond League - Monaco
FILE PHOTO: Athletics – Diamond League – Monaco – Stade Louis II, Monaco – July 20, 2018 South Africa’s Caster Semenya wins the Women’s 800m REUTERS/Eric Gaillard

March 22, 2019

CAPE TOWN (Reuters) – Double Olympic 800-metres champion Caster Semenya is “optimistic” of success in her appeal to the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) over eligibility regulations in athletics for female classification.

The International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) contends that Semenya and other female athletes that are classed as having differences in sexual development (DSDs) gain an unfair advantage due to their higher testosterone levels, but only in races between 400 and 1,000-metres.

Under its new rules, which are currently suspended pending the outcome of the CAS case, athletes classed as having DSDs must medically reduce their blood testosterone level for a continuous period of six months before they can compete.

“Caster Semenya remains optimistic that CAS will declare the IAAF’s Regulations unlawful, invalid and of no effect,” Semenya’s lawyers said in a statement on Friday, confirming at the same time that the athlete had made additional submissions to CAS following “post-hearing communications from the IAAF”.

They did not go into detail as to what those submissions were in relation to.

Semenya received support from the United Nations this week as they adopted a resolution tabled by South Africa “aimed at eliminating discrimination against women and girls in sport, giving significant global weight from a human rights perspective to Caster Semenya’s case”, according to a media release from the South African government.

The resolution was co-sponsored by Eswatini (formerly known as Swaziland), Mozambique, Namibia, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Burundi, India, Iceland and Canada.

“The international campaign to preserve Caster’s right to participate in global sports is a struggle for all women in the world against discrimination, sexism, and patriarchy,” South Africa’s minister of international relations and cooperation, Lindiwe Sisulu, said.

CAS has called the hearing one of its most pivotal cases that could have a wide reaching consequence, not just for the future of athletics, but sport in general.

The court postponed its verdict from the five-day hearing in February, due to be delivered next week, until the end of April, with no fixed date set.

The IAAF has said that, given the delay, it would alter the six-month rule for the world championships in Qatar in September and introduce a “special transitional period” so that affected athletes could still compete.

It added that, assuming its new regulations were upheld, affected athletes who comply with the new limit from one week after the final CAS decision until the start of the world championships in September would be allowed to take part.

(Reporting by Nick Said; Editing by Toby Davis)

Source: OANN

David Hookstead | Reporter

An unnamed NFL executive unloaded on the college football system, and his comments seem pretty accurate.

Talk of paying college football players isn’t anything new, but it does seem to becoming more and more popular as time goes by. Ten years ago, I wouldn’t have supported it, but now I think athletes in college should be able to make some money in some kind of way or another. Well, there’s at least one NFL leader who feels a lot more fired up than I do, judging from some recent comments posted Thursday afternoon. (RELATED: American Athletic Conference Signs $1 Billion Deal With ESPN)

The anonymous executive said the following in part to Robert Klemko:

The NCAA, they’re all crooks. It’s extortion of these players, because they’re all beat up. They’re 22-years-old and we can’t draft him, or we knock ’em down the board and the doctor says we might be able to get one contract out of him. They’re never more marketable than the four years they’re in college. Their stadiums are bigger than ours and everyone paid $100 bucks to get in and $50 to park and the conference has a TV contract and there’s national TV and the players don’t get a dime? How in the world is this legal?

You can read his whole statement below.

My guess is that there’s a lot of people who feel the exact same way in the NFL, but wouldn’t ever go on record to say it. Let’s not forget that the NCAA pretty much is a free minor league system for pro football, and it doesn’t cost the league a penny.

These young men go out there, get their bodies crushed and most of them will never even sniff the NFL. They’re 30 with broken bodies and nothing more than a degree to show for it. If they take one penny in college, they could be suspended forever. (RELATED: Clemson Beats Alabama For National Title)

I’ve been to more college football games than I can count. Major college programs print money. It’s an ATM machine for the NCAA, and there isn’t a limit on withdrawals.

Again, the kids get nothing more than their scholarship and what’s included with that. They blow out a knee and never play again; too bad.

It’s really time for something to change because at this point the NCAA should really just be embarrassed with itself.

I don’t have the answers as to how we change the current system, but I know it has to change. Maybe, we should have some more NFL executives come out and just publicly rip the system. If the NFL demanded change, it could happen pretty fast.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

An unnamed NFL executive unloaded on the college football system, and his comments seem pretty accurate.

Talk of paying college football players isn’t anything new, but it does seem to becoming more and more popular as time goes by. Ten years ago, I wouldn’t have supported it, but now I think athletes in college should be able to make some money in some kind of way or another. Well, there’s at least one NFL leader who feels a lot more fired up than I do, judging from some recent comments posted Thursday afternoon. (RELATED: American Athletic Conference Signs $1 Billion Deal With ESPN)

The anonymous executive said the following in part to Robert Klemko:

The NCAA, they’re all crooks. It’s extortion of these players, because they’re all beat up. They’re 22-years-old and we can’t draft him, or we knock ’em down the board and the doctor says we might be able to get one contract out of him. They’re never more marketable than the four years they’re in college. Their stadiums are bigger than ours and everyone paid $100 bucks to get in and $50 to park and the conference has a TV contract and there’s national TV and the players don’t get a dime? How in the world is this legal?

You can read his whole statement below.

My guess is that there’s a lot of people who feel the exact same way in the NFL, but wouldn’t ever go on record to say it. Let’s not forget that the NCAA pretty much is a free minor league system for pro football, and it doesn’t cost the league a penny.

These young men go out there, get their bodies crushed and most of them will never even sniff the NFL. They’re 30 with broken bodies and nothing more than a degree to show for it. If they take one penny in college, they could be suspended forever. (RELATED: Clemson Beats Alabama For National Title)

I’ve been to more college football games than I can count. Major college programs print money. It’s an ATM machine for the NCAA, and there isn’t a limit on withdrawals.

Again, the kids get nothing more than their scholarship and what’s included with that. They blow out a knee and never play again; too bad.

It’s really time for something to change because at this point the NCAA should really just be embarrassed with itself.

I don’t have the answers as to how we change the current system, but I know it has to change. Maybe, we should have some more NFL executives come out and just publicly rip the system. If the NFL demanded change, it could happen pretty fast.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Democrat Party's candidate Anwar Salae campaigns at a market in Pattani province
Democrat Party’s candidate for Member of Parliament Anwar Salae campaigns at a market in Pattani province, Thailand, March 16, 2019. Picture taken March 16, 2019. REUTERS/Panu Wongcha-um

March 22, 2019

By Panu Wongcha-um

YALA, Thailand (Reuters) – Pateemoh Poh-itaeda-oh, 39, has lost four family members to violence in Thailand’s deep south, where a Muslim separatist movement has fought against rule from Bangkok for 15 years.

Now, she is running for a parliamentary seat in a general election on Sunday, hoping to have a hand in making government policies for the restive region.

Sunday’s vote is broadly seen as a battle between allies of the military junta leader seeking to stay in power and supporters of ousted ex-premier Thaksin Shinawatra, a former telecommunication tycoon whose loyalists have won every general election since 2001.

But that divide has a different dynamic in the three southern border provinces of Pattani, Yala, and Narathiwat, which are 80 percent Muslim, while the rest of Thailand is overwhelmingly Buddhist.

A separatist insurgency has dragged on since 2004, killing more than 6,900 people. In January, two Buddhist monks were shot dead in a suspected insurgent attack.

In previous elections, the deep south was not much courted by politicians seeking national power. But the arrival of several new parties on the political scene, along with stalled peace talks, have stirred interest in the campaign in the south – and enthusiasm to participate among newly minted candidates.

Pateemoh, a Muslim who is a candidate for the pro-junta Action Coalition for Thailand party (ACT), said she got involved because she felt for the first time there was a chance for the concerns of the south to be heard and – possibly – bring an end to the conflict.

“For a long time many Thais have looked at problems in the deep south as a marginal border issue, but this election I have seen changes,” she told Reuters at her party headquarters in Yala province.

Ending the insurgency is deeply personal to her. Three of her brothers and one sister have been shot dead since 2004 in suspected attacks by insurgents, who often target teachers and local officials for working with central government.

“I really want to be a voice in forming policy and solving the conflict issue in the deep south, and people have to remember that women’s voices need to matter in this process,” she said.

SELF-DETERMINATION

The three provinces, and a small part of neighboring Songkhla, were historically part of a Malay Muslim sultanate annexed by Thailand in 1909. Separatist tensions have simmered ever since.

A peace process between the Thai government and insurgent groups has made little headway, with violence still occurring even though the military has been directly in charge of security in the region for 15 years.

In February, Mara Patani, an umbrella organization representing many insurgent groups, said it has suspended all dialogue with Bangkok until after the election.

For decades, the deep south’s small tally of seats – 11 out of 350 being contested in this election – were seen as a reliable bloc for the Democrat Party, the country’s oldest political party that is officially non-aligned in the campaign but could prove crucial in post-vote coalition-building.

But the fresh attention being paid to the region by new parties has stoked pent-up desire for a say among both the pro-government and pro-autonomy camps there, said Samart Thongfhua, a political analyst at Prince of Songkla University in Pattani.

“Generally, people in the deep south are enthusiastic from all sides because they will feel that they can gain justice through democracy,” he said.

RELIGIOUS TENSIONS

This is the first election that a Malay Muslim from the deep south, Wan Muhamad Noor Matha, 74, is a prime ministerial candidate.

Matha, a former house speaker and the leader of Prachachart Party, is a key ally to Thaksin who could help capture votes for the “democratic front” of anti-junta parties in the deep south. Pro-Thaksin parties have in the past performed badly in the region, where he was widely blamed for exacerbating the conflict with harsh tactics when he was in power from 2001 to 2006.

Prachachart has been campaigning greater people’s participation in the region’s governance and peace process.

Analysts predict that no single party will dominate the region, with the Democrats, ACT, Bhumjaithai Party, and two anti-junta parties, Prachachart and Future Forward, all seen as competitive.

All are campaigning for greater autonomy to a varying degree for the restive region, a sensitive issue for the Thai military.

Even talking about greater autonomy alarms the region’s Buddhist minority, and coincides with the emergence on the national stage of the Buddhist nationalist Pandin Dharma Party.

“There is a sentiment that Buddhism is under threat and this has been appealing to many Buddhists here,” Ruckchart Suwan, 54, of the Buddhist Network for Peace told Reuters.

Muslim politicians say more needs to be done to improve relationship between Buddhists and Muslims.

“It is good to hear real grievances from the Buddhists so we can address it properly,” said Worawit Baru, 67, a candidate for Prachachart Party in Pattani province.

“The security forces have brought Buddhists and Muslims together over meals many times and say this represent successful reconciliation,” Worawit said. “These window-dressing approaches must stop and we need the people to speak up.”

(Reporting by Panu Wongcha-um; Additional reporting by Panarat Thepgumpanat; Editing by Kay Johnson and Alex Richardson)

Source: OANN

Gold medallist Ivanov of Russia poses during the award ceremony for the men's 20 km race walk final during the IAAF World Athletics Championships at the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow
FILE PHOTO: Gold medallist Aleksandr Ivanov of Russia poses during the award ceremony for the men’s 20 km race walk final during the IAAF World Athletics Championships at the Luzhniki stadium in Moscow August 11, 2013. REUTERS/Fabrizio Bensch

March 22, 2019

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Russian race walker Aleksandr Ivanov has been disqualified for three years for doping and is set to be stripped of his gold medal at the 2013 world championships in Moscow, the Russian athletics federation said on Friday.

Ivanov will lose all the medals he won between June 2012 and August 2014, the federation said. He is disqualified for a three-year period that began on May 2, 2017, the date of his earlier suspension, it said.

Ivanov, whose blood contained abnormalities, according to the federation — won gold in the 20km race walk at the IAAF World Championships in 2013, beating China’s Ding Cheng and Spain’s Miguel Angel Lopez.

Russia’s athletics federation has been suspended since a 2015 report commissioned by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) found evidence of state-sponsored doping in the sport.

The IAAF global athletics ruling body has still authorized some Russians, including 2015 world champion hurdler Sergey Shubenkov, to compete as neutrals after having demonstrated they are competing in a doping-free environment.

(Reporting by Gabrielle Tétrault-Farber; Writing by Tom Balmforth; editing by Christian Radnedge)

Source: OANN

FILE PHOTO: U.S.-based cleric Fethullah Gulen at his home in Saylorsburg
FILE PHOTO: U.S.-based Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen at his home in Saylorsburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. July 10, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller/File Photo

March 22, 2019

ISTANBUL (Reuters) – The Istanbul chief prosecutor said on Friday it had ordered the detention of 126 suspects employed in the judicial system with alleged links to the network of Fethullah Gulen, a cleric who Turkey says orchestrated a July 2016 coup attempt.

About 250 people were killed in the failed putsch, in which Gulen, a former ally of President Tayyip Erdogan, has denied involvement. Gulen has lived in self-imposed exile in Pennsylvania since 1999.

Turkey says that along with its military and state institutions, its judiciary was infiltrated by members of Gulen’s network. Since the coup, thousands of prosecutors and judges have been dismissed.

The prosecutor’s office said the suspects had lived in houses where the network trained individuals for work in the judicial system. The network then sought to place those who passed the exam in the judicial system as prosecutors or judges, while the rest became part of the network’s lawyer organization.

Of the 126 suspects, 108 were lawyers on active duty, eight were judge or prosecutor candidates who were previously removed from their positions and one was a judge or prosecutor candidate on active duty, the prosecutor’s office said.

Addresses of 12 of the suspects could not be determined or records showed they had left the country, it said, adding that operations spread over 37 provinces to detain the remaining 114 people were continuing.

In a separate operation on Friday, Ankara chief prosecutor’s office said it ordered the detention of 18 suspects accused of links to Gulen who were working as engineers for the defense industry company Havelsan.

More than 77,000 people have been jailed pending trial since the coup and widespread arrests are still routine. Authorities have suspended or sacked 150,000 civil servants and military personnel.

Turkey’s Western allies have criticized the crackdown, with Erdogan’s critics accusing him of using the putsch as a pretext to quash dissent. Turkish authorities say the measures are necessary to combat threats to national security.

(Reporting by Ali Kucukgocmen and Mert Ozkan, Editing by William Maclean)

Source: OANN

BSF soldier checks the passport of an Indian passenger from the 'friendship bus' between Indian and Pakistan at the Wagah-Attari border crossing
A Border Security Force (BSF) soldier checks the passport of an Indian passenger from the ‘friendship bus’ between Indian and Pakistan at the Wagah-Attari border crossing, India, March 15, 2019. REUTERS/Alasdair Pal

March 22, 2019

By Alasdair Pal

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – One Friday morning before dawn, a half-empty Volvo coach slipped out of New Delhi’s Ambedkar bus terminal under armed guard, the sirens of a police convoy wailing.

Carrying a mixture of Indian and Pakistani tourists, the bus, emblazoned with the flags of both countries and the phrase ‘Sada-e-Sarhad’ (Call of the Frontier), is one of the few remaining transport links between the nuclear-armed neighbors, who clashed last month over the disputed Kashmir region in a conflict that alarmed world powers.

But as Reuters found on a return trip on what is also known as the ‘dosti (friendship) bus’, that runs daily except Sundays between Delhi and the Pakistani city of Lahore, it is a powerful symbol of hope for better relations between the rivals, who despite their political differences share strong linguistic, cultural and family ties.

After breakfast at a government-run restaurant on the highway where police seal off the grounds, passengers from both countries watch a Bollywood film on board, starring one of India’s many Muslim actors.

“Salman Khan is a Muslim, he is one of us,” said Hilal Ahmad Mir, 36, a Kashmiri apple farmer and father of four.

The journey from his home in the south Kashmir valley to Pakistan’s capital Islamabad to visit his brother Hamid, should be less than 300 km (200 miles) by the most direct route, across the contested border known as the Line of Control.

But with the ongoing conflict making that route effectively impossible, he is forced to take a lengthy detour via Delhi and Lahore, before eventually reaching Islamabad two days later.

Still, he is upbeat.

“Pakistan makes it easy for Kashmiris to get a visa,” he said. “In some ways, Pakistan and India have a very good relationship. We have had a lot of damage. We want friendship, not guns.”

SEPARATED AT BIRTH

India and Pakistan have thousands of years of shared history. Delhi and Lahore’s sandstone forts and grand mosques were all constructed by the Mughal empire, and both countries were later part of British colonial India.

When Britain gave up control of the Indian subcontinent in 1947, it hastily partitioned it into Hindu-majority India and Islamic Pakistan. Hundreds of thousands died in ethnic bloodshed and millions more became refugees.

Relations between the two countries have been strained ever since. They have fought three wars, two of them over the Muslim-majority Kashmir region that both claim in full but rule in part. Last month, they clashed over a suicide attack on an Indian paramilitary convoy in Kashmir by Pakistani militants.

In an attempt to maintain close links to Indian-administered Kashmir, Pakistan often approves visas for the Muslim-majority population on the same day.

    For the vast majority of people in both countries, however, arranging a visa to visit to the other side is a bureaucratic process that often takes as long as three months, according to half a dozen of the bus’s passengers.

“My family is divided: my wife’s side is in India, my side in Pakistan,” said Shoaib Mohammed, a banker from Karachi returning after a month in Delhi. “The visa process takes at least 45 days and is often extended.”

Though the bus, inaugurated in 1999 by India’s then-prime minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee, has been briefly suspended over the years, it ran uninterrupted through the last major clash between the two countries that erupted weeks after the launch.

Neither has it been canceled over the tensions of the last month, although passenger numbers dropped into the single digits, officials said, a testimony to the huge police operation to protect it.

Several armed police are always on board – one of whom on this trip snores on the back seat, rifle on his lap. Dozens more block off roads in Delhi and other major towns, while a convoy ahead clears traffic.

But even without policing costs, the bus loses money, according to a senior Pakistani diplomat based in New Delhi familiar with the bus’s operations.

“Commercially, the bus is a failure,” he said. “But relations between the two countries are so bad at the moment neither side can afford to cancel it.”

INTO THE SUNSET

After lunch in another deserted and heavily guarded highway restaurant, the bus passes through Wagah-Attari, one of the few active border crossings between India and Pakistan. It is best known for an elaborate dusk ceremony where high-kicking guards from both countries perform a choreographed routine at a purpose-built stadium that straddles the border.

Most days, just 100 people cross in either direction, Indian and Pakistani border officials said. Both times Reuters crossed the border, the process took close to three hours, and the terminal was deserted with no other travelers in sight apart from those on the bus.

Mir, from Kashmir, is held by Indian border officials for 40 minutes for questioning.

“Kashmiris are dangerous,” he laughed, as he returned to the bus.

Shortly before the dusk ceremony begins, the bus drives across the border through the stadium, where hundreds of spectators from both countries roar their approval.

Passengers then pass through near-identical Pakistani immigration checks.

On board, spirits are high as the bus begins its last lap to the center of Lahore, about 20 km (12 miles) away.

“We have been visiting for the last 40 years and this time there were no problems for me as a normal visitor,” Mohammed said, of his visit to Delhi when tensions were at their peak. “I didn’t feel any anger against Pakistanis. Nothing.”

(Reporting by Alasdair Pal; Editing by Raju Gopalakrishnan)

Source: OANN


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