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Fans watch the final episode of Game of Thrones at a watch party in the Manhattan borough of New York
Fans watch the final episode of Game of Thrones at a watch party in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., May 19, 2019. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs

May 20, 2019

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Mixed reviews, a stray water bottle and pleas for a spinoff for feisty teen assassin Arya Stark marked the end of “Game of Thrones,” which came to a close on Sunday with one more shocking demise and an unlikely character named as king.

The 80-minute series finale of HBO’s medieval fantasy series proved as divisive as Season 8 itself, with the hard fought Iron Throne burned to the ground and the saga ending in what some called an anti-climax.

USA Today’s Kelly Lawler called the finale “a disaster ending that fans didn’t deserve,” adding that it was “hacky; it was cliched.”

Britain’s Radio Times was kinder, with blogger Huw Fullerton writing there were “some bits I liked, one or two I loved, an awful lot that leaves me scratching my head. But I will say, it ended better than I expected given the last two episodes.”

According to review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the finale got 59 % approval from television critics, compared with 92 % for the Season 8 premiere on April 14.

Television series creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss were silent on Monday. The executive producers had said they planned to go offline when the finale aired.

“We’ll be in an undisclosed location, turning off our phones and opening various bottles,” Weiss told Entertainment Weekly earlier this year.

Many fans were more upset about the series coming to an end after eight seasons.

“I thought it would be more of a dramatic ending,” healthcare worker Christine Lethune told Reuters at a viewing party in New York. “I’m mad, I’m mad that this is the last episode. I wish that there was more after this.”

Eagle eyed fans spotted another modern prop that made its way on camera.

On Sunday. it was a plastic water bottle seen partly hidden behind the boot of character Samwell Tarly. The sighting followed dismay and jokes over the sighting of a stray paper coffee cup glimpsed during episode 4, aired two weeks ago.

HBO last year ordered a prequel, co-written by author George R.R. Martin, that is set thousands of years before the events of “Game of Thrones.”

But on Monday, many fans wanted a sequel based around Arya Stark (Maisie Williams), who is last seen aboard a ship to explore lands unknown.

“Arya was the only good part of Season 8. Give us the spinoff,” tweeted Riley McAtee, an associate editor at sports and pop culture website The Ringer.com

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; editing by Diane Craft)

Source: OANN

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Cybersecurity experts say Baltimore is playing with fire as a deadline to pay thousands of dollars in ransom to hackers holding several of the city’s servers hostage has come and gone.

It has been two weeks since a cyberattack crippled Baltimore’s computer network. The internet thieves wanted 13 bitcoins – about $100,000 – at the beginning, but the sum has risen $10,000 per day since. The deadline for the payment – Friday – has come and gone. The city isn’t saying whether it paid but several servers were still inoperable Monday.

“What’s frustrating with Baltimore is that it’s been quite a long time since the infection,” Daniel Tobok, CEO of Cytelligence, told Fox News. “If they aren’t fully operational by now, why are they still playing with this?”

BALTIMORE HIT BY RANSOMWARE ATTACK, FORCING OFFICIALS TO SHUT DOWN CITY’S SERVERS 

Tobok, whose company has helped 500 municipalities hit by ransomware attacks, says while he doesn’t necessarily advocate paying off cyber crooks, he believes that in some instances “you don’t have a choice, you have to make a business decision.”

He also warns that if Baltimore keeps stalling, the outcome could be devastating.

“Baltimore is playing with time,” he said. “They are going to come to a point where they have two choices – A. The (ransom demands) are going to skyrocket or B. The hackers will shut down the account they have been using and move out.”

If that happens, any communication or hope of restoring data could be out the window, Tobok said.

Baltimore resident Rupert Choudhry says he’s “holding his breath” and worries this could be the calm before an even bigger cyberstorm.

“We are all in a wait-and-see mode,” Choudhry told Fox News.

The FBI’s cyber squad and experts from Microsoft have been working around the clock trying to help Maryland’s largest city. The mayor’s office told Fox News on Monday that there has not been an increase in the severity of the attack, but did not provide details beyond that.

On Friday, Mayor Jack Young said he was unable to provide “an exact timeline on when all systems will be restored.”

ECUADOR HIT WITH 40 MILLION CYBER ATTACKS SINE JULIAN ASSANGE ARREST

“Like any large enterprise, we have thousands of systems and applications,” he said in a statement forwarded to Fox. “Our focus is getting critical services back online, and doing so in a manner that ensures we keep security as one of our top priorities throughout this process.”

He added that the city could see “partial services beginning to restore within a matter of weeks” while some of the more “intricate systems may take months in the recovery process.”

The attack itself already has had a devastating domino effect in Charm City. Residents have not been able to pay their bills online, finance department employees can only accept checks or money orders and no property transactions have been conducted since the attack. Most major title insurance companies have even prohibited their agents from issuing policies for properties in Baltimore, according to the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors.

Citing the ongoing criminal investigation, the city’s information technology boss Frank Johnson and other city leaders said their hands were tied and could not provide specifics about the attack or realistically forecast when the city would be up and running.

They do have several “work arounds” in place that allow some departments to slowly get back to business. Johnson called the situation “incredibly fluid.”

“Anybody’s that’s in this business will tell you that as you learn more, those plans change by the minute,” he said.

Unfortunately, this isn’t Baltimore’s first run-in with cyberattacks.

There have been two major breaches to the city’s computer systems under Johnson’s watch.

The latest batch of problems come just over a year after another ransomware attack slammed Baltimore’s 911 dispatch system, prompting a 17-hour shutdown of automated emergency dispatching. The March 2018 attack required operating the critical 911 service in manual mode.

Johnson is one of the city’s highest paid employees, earning $250,000 a year. That’s more than the mayor, the city’s top prosecutor and the health commissioner are paid.

This latest attack came about a week after the firing of a city employee who, the inspector general said, had downloaded thousands of sexually explicit images onto his work computer.

While all municipalities are menaced by malware, cybersecurity experts say organizations that fall victim to such attacks often haven’t done a thorough job of patching systems regularly.

Asher DeMetz, lead security consultant for technology company Sungard Availability Services, told The Associated Press that the number of days Baltimore’s servers have been down is unusually long.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

“The city of Baltimore should have been prepared with a recovery strategy and been able to recover within much much less time. That time would be dictated by a risk assessment guiding how long they can afford to be down,” DeMetz said. “They shoud have been ready, especially after the previous attack, to recover from ransomware.”

In the last month alone, a list of known cyberattacks includes Stuart City, Fla., City of Greenville, New York state, Imperial County, Cleveland Airport, Genesee County, Fisher County in Texas and the Sugar City School District.

Source: Fox News National

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One of President Trump’s nominees sided Monday with the liberal wing of the Supreme Court for the second time in two weeks, as Justice Neil Gorsuch joined a narrow majority in support of a Native American man convicted for hunting in a national forest.

The case, Herrera v. Wyoming, deals with a treaty from 1868 which allowed members of the tribe to hunt in “unoccupied lands” in the U.S. in exchange for their land, which went on to become part of Wyoming and Montana. At issue was whether the hunting rights in the treaty are still in effect or were nullified when Wyoming became a state in 1890.

KAVANAUGH SIDES WITH LIBERAL JUSTICES AGAINST APPLE, DEALS BLOW TO TECH GIANT IN APP STORE CHALLENGE

The opinion by Justice Sonia Sotomayor – and joined by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan, Stephen Breyer, and Gorsuch – ruled that the treaty indeed still applies, and that Crow member Clayvin Herrera was improperly convicted of off-season hunting in Bighorn National Forest in 2014.

The court’s 5-4 ruling, which vacated the decision from the state appellate court, is based on the 1999 decision in Minnesota v. Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians. In that case, the Supreme Court said that a territory gaining statehood is not enough “to extinguish Indian treaty rights to hunt, fish, and gather on land within state boundaries.” The court went further in that case, stating that Congress “must clearly express” an intention to end a treaty with a Native American tribe in order for the treaty’s rights to expire.

By siding with the traditionally liberal justices, Gorsuch gave them a 5-4 majority in the case.

The opinion came exactly one week after Trump’s other nominee, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, sided with liberals in a 5-4 decision that he wrote, ruling that Apple could be sued by iPhone owners over high prices in their App Store.

Sotomayor, in the latest opinion, also addressed the argument that the land on which Hererra was hunting became “occupied” under the treaty when it became a national forest in 1897. The court’s decision said that while it is possible that certain areas of the forest could be considered occupied, the forest as a whole is not occupied by default simply because it is a national forest.

Hererra’s attorney, George W. Hicks, celebrated his client’s victory. “We are gratified that the Supreme Court held that the treaty hunting right guaranteed to the Crow Tribe and Mr. Herrera was not abrogated by Wyoming’s admission to the Union or the creation of the Bighorn National Forest,” he said in a statement to Fox News.

Gorsuch’s conservative colleagues, led by Justice Samuel Alito, argued in a dissenting opinion that the majority has it all wrong. Alito, like the lower court’s decision, relied on an 1896 case involving a similarly worded treaty between Wyoming and the Shoshonee and Bannack tribes, which also was from 1868. That case, Ward v. Race Horse, said that when Wyoming became a state, it ended the treaty. This ruling was based on the idea that states have the authority “to regulate the killing of game within their borders.”

Additionally, the conservative dissent said that a 1995 10th Circuit opinion in Crow Tribe of Indians v. Repsis dealt with the exact issue in Hererra’s case, relying on the precedent in Race Horse to say that the Crow Tribe’s hunting rights under their treaty expired when Wyoming became a state. Because the issue was already decided in that case, the dissent said, it was improper for it to be heard again here.

GORSUCH REPLACES BIDEN AS CHAIR OF CIVIC EDUCATION GROUP

The majority opinion addressed the Race Horse and Repsis cases, stating that the more recent 1999 Mille Lacs case renders them obsolete. Sotomayor also wrote that it did not matter that the same treaty had been addressed in the past, because the Mille Lacs case represented a “change in [the] applicable legal context.” The conservatives disagreed.

Source: Fox News Politics

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FILE PHOTO: The Canary Wharf financial district is seen at dusk in London
FILE PHOTO: The Canary Wharf financial district is seen at dusk in London, Britain, March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Marika Kochiashvili/File Photo

May 20, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – British companies are likely to cancel projects that they have put on hold because of Brexit uncertainty if the country leaves the European Union without a deal to smooth the shock, Bank of England Deputy Governor Ben Broadbent said on Monday.

Business investment fell throughout 2018 as companies waited for clarity on the terms of Brexit and grew only slightly early this year, a situation Broadbent described as “remarkable” given the economy was still growing and company profits were high.

With just days to go before Britain was due to leave on March 29, Prime Minister Theresa May asked the EU for more time to negotiate a deal. Brexit has now been delayed until Oct. 31 unless there is an early agreement.

Some Brexit supporters have said Britain should leave the EU now with no agreement, as businesses would at least know they would have to revert to trade on World Trade Organization terms.

But Broadbent said surveys showed companies viewed this scenario as the most negative of all.

“It would be wrong to conclude … that the best thing for investment is to resolve this uncertainty as soon as you can, by any means necessary,” Broadbent said in a speech to Imperial College Business School in London.

“Deliberately choosing the outcome firms say they view most negatively is more likely to mean that capital projects that have so far been deferred are then simply canceled,” he said.

Broadbent said the impact of uncertainty on business investment appeared to rise as the Brexit deadline neared – making it important to avoid giving businesses further false hope of an immediate resolution to Brexit uncertainties.

“A repeated series of cliff-edges, each of which is expected to be decisive but in reality just gives way to the next cliff, is more damaging for investment than if it had been clear at the outset that the process will take time.”

Earlier this month BoE Governor Mark Carney said business investment was likely to continue to be weak, but that there should be an improvement – and reduced reliance on consumers – if Brexit took place smoothly.

(Reporting by David Milliken, Writing by William Schomberg and Andy Bruce; editing by Emelia Sithole-Matarise)

Source: OANN

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Kayleigh McEnany has slammed former Vice President Joe Biden for taking credit for the rebound experienced by the American economy.

During a recent campaign stop, Biden argued that President Trump “inherited” the economic environment set forth by himself and President Obama,  “just like he inherited everything else in his life.” McEnany argued during an interview with “America’s Newsroom” on Monday morning the president changed many policies that hindered American economic growth under the Obama administration.

“President Trump reversed the disastrous Obama economy,” McEnany, national press secretary for President Trump’s re-election campaign, said, before turning her attention to Biden.

“Joe Biden is an empty suit who hasn’t been asked a single hard question.”

TRUMP MOCKS BIDEN, SAYS OBAMA TOOK HIM OFF THE ‘TRASH HEAP’

“President Trump has reversed every metric. I understand [Biden] wants to take claim for the Trump economy but, factually speaking, he can’t.”

Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg also commented on the economy during a town hall with Fox News on Sunday evening, and proposed a “reasonable wealth tax to make sure people are giving back when they become enormously wealthy.”

McEnany claimed Buttigieg’s suggestion to increase taxes is another example of “tax and spend socialists” in the Democratic party.

BIDEN DISMISSES CHINA’S THREAT TO US AGAIN, DESPITE BACKTRACKING ON EARLIER COMMENTS

“We believe in giving the American people more of their money as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act did,” she said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“So if you like your money, vote for President Trump. If you want to give it to Pete Buttigieg and the socialists who want to do the Green New Deal, by all means, do that. It won’t be a good scenario for your paycheck and bottom line,” she continued.

Source: Fox News Politics

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0 0

‘Game of Thrones’ leaves fans sad, mad and wanting more

Fans watch the final episode of Game of Thrones at a watch party in the Manhattan borough of New York
Fans watch the final episode of Game of Thrones at a watch party in the Manhattan borough of New York City, U.S., May 19, 2019. REUTERS/Caitlin Ochs

May 20, 2019

LOS ANGELES (Reuters) – Mixed reviews, a stray water bottle and pleas for a spinoff for feisty teen assassin Arya Stark marked the end of “Game of Thrones,” which came to a close on Sunday with one more shocking demise and an unlikely character named as king.

The 80-minute series finale of HBO’s medieval fantasy series proved as divisive as Season 8 itself, with the hard fought Iron Throne burned to the ground and the saga ending in what some called an anti-climax.

USA Today’s Kelly Lawler called the finale “a disaster ending that fans didn’t deserve,” adding that it was “hacky; it was cliched.”

Britain’s Radio Times was kinder, with blogger Huw Fullerton writing there were “some bits I liked, one or two I loved, an awful lot that leaves me scratching my head. But I will say, it ended better than I expected given the last two episodes.”

According to review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, the finale got 59 % approval from television critics, compared with 92 % for the Season 8 premiere on April 14.

Television series creators David Benioff and D.B. Weiss were silent on Monday. The executive producers had said they planned to go offline when the finale aired.

“We’ll be in an undisclosed location, turning off our phones and opening various bottles,” Weiss told Entertainment Weekly earlier this year.

Many fans were more upset about the series coming to an end after eight seasons.

“I thought it would be more of a dramatic ending,” healthcare worker Christine Lethune told Reuters at a viewing party in New York. “I’m mad, I’m mad that this is the last episode. I wish that there was more after this.”

Eagle eyed fans spotted another modern prop that made its way on camera.

On Sunday. it was a plastic water bottle seen partly hidden behind the boot of character Samwell Tarly. The sighting followed dismay and jokes over the sighting of a stray paper coffee cup glimpsed during episode 4, aired two weeks ago.

HBO last year ordered a prequel, co-written by author George R.R. Martin, that is set thousands of years before the events of “Game of Thrones.”

But on Monday, many fans wanted a sequel based around Arya Stark (Maisie Williams), who is last seen aboard a ship to explore lands unknown.

“Arya was the only good part of Season 8. Give us the spinoff,” tweeted Riley McAtee, an associate editor at sports and pop culture website The Ringer.com

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; editing by Diane Craft)

Source: OANN

0 0

Cybersecurity experts warn Baltimore to stop ‘playing’ with ransomware attacks

Cybersecurity experts say Baltimore is playing with fire as a deadline to pay thousands of dollars in ransom to hackers holding several of the city's servers hostage has come and gone.

It has been two weeks since a cyberattack crippled Baltimore's computer network. The internet thieves wanted 13 bitcoins - about $100,000 - at the beginning, but the sum has risen $10,000 per day since. The deadline for the payment - Friday - has come and gone. The city isn't saying whether it paid but several servers were still inoperable Monday.

"What's frustrating with Baltimore is that it's been quite a long time since the infection," Daniel Tobok, CEO of Cytelligence, told Fox News. "If they aren't fully operational by now, why are they still playing with this?"

BALTIMORE HIT BY RANSOMWARE ATTACK, FORCING OFFICIALS TO SHUT DOWN CITY'S SERVERS 

Tobok, whose company has helped 500 municipalities hit by ransomware attacks, says while he doesn't necessarily advocate paying off cyber crooks, he believes that in some instances "you don't have a choice, you have to make a business decision."

He also warns that if Baltimore keeps stalling, the outcome could be devastating.

"Baltimore is playing with time," he said. "They are going to come to a point where they have two choices - A. The (ransom demands) are going to skyrocket or B. The hackers will shut down the account they have been using and move out."

If that happens, any communication or hope of restoring data could be out the window, Tobok said.

Baltimore resident Rupert Choudhry says he's "holding his breath" and worries this could be the calm before an even bigger cyberstorm.

"We are all in a wait-and-see mode," Choudhry told Fox News.

The FBI's cyber squad and experts from Microsoft have been working around the clock trying to help Maryland's largest city. The mayor's office told Fox News on Monday that there has not been an increase in the severity of the attack, but did not provide details beyond that.

On Friday, Mayor Jack Young said he was unable to provide "an exact timeline on when all systems will be restored."

ECUADOR HIT WITH 40 MILLION CYBER ATTACKS SINE JULIAN ASSANGE ARREST

"Like any large enterprise, we have thousands of systems and applications," he said in a statement forwarded to Fox. "Our focus is getting critical services back online, and doing so in a manner that ensures we keep security as one of our top priorities throughout this process."

He added that the city could see "partial services beginning to restore within a matter of weeks" while some of the more "intricate systems may take months in the recovery process."

The attack itself already has had a devastating domino effect in Charm City. Residents have not been able to pay their bills online, finance department employees can only accept checks or money orders and no property transactions have been conducted since the attack. Most major title insurance companies have even prohibited their agents from issuing policies for properties in Baltimore, according to the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors.

Citing the ongoing criminal investigation, the city's information technology boss Frank Johnson and other city leaders said their hands were tied and could not provide specifics about the attack or realistically forecast when the city would be up and running.

They do have several "work arounds" in place that allow some departments to slowly get back to business. Johnson called the situation "incredibly fluid."

"Anybody's that's in this business will tell you that as you learn more, those plans change by the minute," he said.

Unfortunately, this isn't Baltimore's first run-in with cyberattacks.

There have been two major breaches to the city's computer systems under Johnson's watch.

The latest batch of problems come just over a year after another ransomware attack slammed Baltimore's 911 dispatch system, prompting a 17-hour shutdown of automated emergency dispatching. The March 2018 attack required operating the critical 911 service in manual mode.

Johnson is one of the city's highest paid employees, earning $250,000 a year. That's more than the mayor, the city's top prosecutor and the health commissioner are paid.

This latest attack came about a week after the firing of a city employee who, the inspector general said, had downloaded thousands of sexually explicit images onto his work computer.

While all municipalities are menaced by malware, cybersecurity experts say organizations that fall victim to such attacks often haven't done a thorough job of patching systems regularly.

Asher DeMetz, lead security consultant for technology company Sungard Availability Services, told The Associated Press that the number of days Baltimore's servers have been down is unusually long.

CLICK HERE FOR THE FOX NEWS APP

"The city of Baltimore should have been prepared with a recovery strategy and been able to recover within much much less time. That time would be dictated by a risk assessment guiding how long they can afford to be down," DeMetz said. "They shoud have been ready, especially after the previous attack, to recover from ransomware."

In the last month alone, a list of known cyberattacks includes Stuart City, Fla., City of Greenville, New York state, Imperial County, Cleveland Airport, Genesee County, Fisher County in Texas and the Sugar City School District.

Source: Fox News National

0 0

Gorsuch breaks with conservative justices, delivering win to Native American hunter

One of President Trump’s nominees sided Monday with the liberal wing of the Supreme Court for the second time in two weeks, as Justice Neil Gorsuch joined a narrow majority in support of a Native American man convicted for hunting in a national forest.

The case, Herrera v. Wyoming, deals with a treaty from 1868 which allowed members of the tribe to hunt in “unoccupied lands” in the U.S. in exchange for their land, which went on to become part of Wyoming and Montana. At issue was whether the hunting rights in the treaty are still in effect or were nullified when Wyoming became a state in 1890.

KAVANAUGH SIDES WITH LIBERAL JUSTICES AGAINST APPLE, DEALS BLOW TO TECH GIANT IN APP STORE CHALLENGE

The opinion by Justice Sonia Sotomayor – and joined by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Elena Kagan, Stephen Breyer, and Gorsuch – ruled that the treaty indeed still applies, and that Crow member Clayvin Herrera was improperly convicted of off-season hunting in Bighorn National Forest in 2014.

The court’s 5-4 ruling, which vacated the decision from the state appellate court, is based on the 1999 decision in Minnesota v. Mille Lacs Band of Chippewa Indians. In that case, the Supreme Court said that a territory gaining statehood is not enough “to extinguish Indian treaty rights to hunt, fish, and gather on land within state boundaries.” The court went further in that case, stating that Congress “must clearly express” an intention to end a treaty with a Native American tribe in order for the treaty’s rights to expire.

By siding with the traditionally liberal justices, Gorsuch gave them a 5-4 majority in the case.

The opinion came exactly one week after Trump’s other nominee, Justice Brett Kavanaugh, sided with liberals in a 5-4 decision that he wrote, ruling that Apple could be sued by iPhone owners over high prices in their App Store.

Sotomayor, in the latest opinion, also addressed the argument that the land on which Hererra was hunting became “occupied” under the treaty when it became a national forest in 1897. The court’s decision said that while it is possible that certain areas of the forest could be considered occupied, the forest as a whole is not occupied by default simply because it is a national forest.

Hererra’s attorney, George W. Hicks, celebrated his client’s victory. “We are gratified that the Supreme Court held that the treaty hunting right guaranteed to the Crow Tribe and Mr. Herrera was not abrogated by Wyoming’s admission to the Union or the creation of the Bighorn National Forest,” he said in a statement to Fox News.

Gorsuch’s conservative colleagues, led by Justice Samuel Alito, argued in a dissenting opinion that the majority has it all wrong. Alito, like the lower court’s decision, relied on an 1896 case involving a similarly worded treaty between Wyoming and the Shoshonee and Bannack tribes, which also was from 1868. That case, Ward v. Race Horse, said that when Wyoming became a state, it ended the treaty. This ruling was based on the idea that states have the authority “to regulate the killing of game within their borders.”

Additionally, the conservative dissent said that a 1995 10th Circuit opinion in Crow Tribe of Indians v. Repsis dealt with the exact issue in Hererra’s case, relying on the precedent in Race Horse to say that the Crow Tribe’s hunting rights under their treaty expired when Wyoming became a state. Because the issue was already decided in that case, the dissent said, it was improper for it to be heard again here.

GORSUCH REPLACES BIDEN AS CHAIR OF CIVIC EDUCATION GROUP

The majority opinion addressed the Race Horse and Repsis cases, stating that the more recent 1999 Mille Lacs case renders them obsolete. Sotomayor also wrote that it did not matter that the same treaty had been addressed in the past, because the Mille Lacs case represented a "change in [the] applicable legal context." The conservatives disagreed.

Source: Fox News Politics

0 0

UK firms likely to scrap planned investment on a no-deal Brexit: BoE’s Broadbent

FILE PHOTO: The Canary Wharf financial district is seen at dusk in London
FILE PHOTO: The Canary Wharf financial district is seen at dusk in London, Britain, March 26, 2019. REUTERS/Marika Kochiashvili/File Photo

May 20, 2019

LONDON (Reuters) – British companies are likely to cancel projects that they have put on hold because of Brexit uncertainty if the country leaves the European Union without a deal to smooth the shock, Bank of England Deputy Governor Ben Broadbent said on Monday.

Business investment fell throughout 2018 as companies waited for clarity on the terms of Brexit and grew only slightly early this year, a situation Broadbent described as “remarkable” given the economy was still growing and company profits were high.

With just days to go before Britain was due to leave on March 29, Prime Minister Theresa May asked the EU for more time to negotiate a deal. Brexit has now been delayed until Oct. 31 unless there is an early agreement.

Some Brexit supporters have said Britain should leave the EU now with no agreement, as businesses would at least know they would have to revert to trade on World Trade Organization terms.

But Broadbent said surveys showed companies viewed this scenario as the most negative of all.

“It would be wrong to conclude … that the best thing for investment is to resolve this uncertainty as soon as you can, by any means necessary,” Broadbent said in a speech to Imperial College Business School in London.

“Deliberately choosing the outcome firms say they view most negatively is more likely to mean that capital projects that have so far been deferred are then simply canceled,” he said.

Broadbent said the impact of uncertainty on business investment appeared to rise as the Brexit deadline neared – making it important to avoid giving businesses further false hope of an immediate resolution to Brexit uncertainties.

“A repeated series of cliff-edges, each of which is expected to be decisive but in reality just gives way to the next cliff, is more damaging for investment than if it had been clear at the outset that the process will take time.”

Earlier this month BoE Governor Mark Carney said business investment was likely to continue to be weak, but that there should be an improvement – and reduced reliance on consumers – if Brexit took place smoothly.

(Reporting by David Milliken, Writing by William Schomberg and Andy Bruce; editing by Emelia Sithole-Matarise)

Source: OANN

0 0

Kayleigh McEnany: Joe Biden is an ’empty suit’ who can’t take credit for the Trump economy

Kayleigh McEnany has slammed former Vice President Joe Biden for taking credit for the rebound experienced by the American economy.

During a recent campaign stop, Biden argued that President Trump "inherited" the economic environment set forth by himself and President Obama,  "just like he inherited everything else in his life." McEnany argued during an interview with "America's Newsroom" on Monday morning the president changed many policies that hindered American economic growth under the Obama administration.

"President Trump reversed the disastrous Obama economy," McEnany, national press secretary for President Trump's re-election campaign, said, before turning her attention to Biden.

"Joe Biden is an empty suit who hasn't been asked a single hard question."

TRUMP MOCKS BIDEN, SAYS OBAMA TOOK HIM OFF THE 'TRASH HEAP'

"President Trump has reversed every metric. I understand [Biden] wants to take claim for the Trump economy but, factually speaking, he can't."

Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg also commented on the economy during a town hall with Fox News on Sunday evening, and proposed a "reasonable wealth tax to make sure people are giving back when they become enormously wealthy."

McEnany claimed Buttigieg's suggestion to increase taxes is another example of "tax and spend socialists" in the Democratic party.

BIDEN DISMISSES CHINA'S THREAT TO US AGAIN, DESPITE BACKTRACKING ON EARLIER COMMENTS

"We believe in giving the American people more of their money as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act did," she said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"So if you like your money, vote for President Trump. If you want to give it to Pete Buttigieg and the socialists who want to do the Green New Deal, by all means, do that. It won't be a good scenario for your paycheck and bottom line," she continued.

Source: Fox News Politics

0 0

Ed Cox, Longtime NY GOP Chairman, Joining Trump Campaign

Ed Cox, the longtime chairman of the New York state Republican Party, will step down to raise money for President Donald Trump's re-election campaign.

Trump's campaign announced the move Monday. Trump campaign manager Brad Parscale called Cox a "fantastic" state chairman who will help ensure the Republican president has the financial resources necessary to compete in 2020.

Erie County Republican Chairman Nick Langworthy is now poised to take over as New York GOP chairman when Cox steps down in July.

Langworthy had launched a bid to replace Cox, who some Republicans blamed for the party's recent election losses.

Monday's announcement came after several local party chairmen announced their support for Langworthy's challenge.

Cox, a lawyer, has led the state GOP since 2009. He is the son-in-law of former President Richard Nixon.

Source: NewsMax Politics

0 0

Court rejects program for woman who abandoned starving cats

A woman whose home was populated by starving cats who had eaten some of their own to survive will have to go back to court to see if she can avoid a trial and possible jail time.

A New Jersey state appeals court ruled Monday that a judge erred last year when he allowed Jill Petruska to enter a pretrial intervention program that would have allowed her to eventually clear her record if she met certain conditions.

Investigators removed 13 live cats from Petruska's Nutley apartment in 2016 and estimated that 12 others had died, though they said getting an accurate number was difficult because animal parts were strewn around. Nutley is about 8 miles (12 kilometers) from Newark.

Petruska said she'd been away and caring for a sick relative but had stopped by periodically to care for the cats. She was charged with 26 counts of animal cruelty. A phone message was left Monday for her attorney.

According to Monday's court filing, the stench from the carcasses and cat feces was so strong that police had to use the fire department's ventilation equipment and wear hazardous materials suits to enter the apartment.

A veterinarian testified to a grand jury that some of the cats had given birth in the apartment and eaten their offspring to survive, the court filing said.

In early 2018, despite opposition from prosecutors, a judge granted Petruska's request for admission into a pretrial program that forbade her from owning or caring for animals for two years and required her to perform 200 hours of community service and undergo counseling.

Monday's ruling disagreed with how prosecutors applied state guidelines to Petruska's request, but still sent the case back to be heard by a different judge. Specifically, it cited the original judge's refusal to look at photographs from the apartment showing the decomposed animals.

"These conditions surely did not evolve over a short period of time and belied defendant's claim to have periodically stopped by the apartment to feed the cats or to have arranged for someone else to take care of the cats," the appeals court wrote.

Source: Fox News National


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