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President Trump told reporters Sunday that the release of a summary of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe findings represented a "complete and total exoneration," calling it "an illegal takedown that failed."

"So after a long look, after a long investigation, after so many people have been so badly hurt, after not looking at the other side, where a lot of bad things happened, a lot of horrible things happened, lot of very bad things happened for our country, it was just announced there was no collusion with Russia, the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard," Trump said as he prepared to board Air Force One to return to Washington from his Mar-A-Lago estate in Florida.

"There was no collusion with Russia," Trump went on. "There was no obstruction, none whatsoever. It was a complete and total exoneration. It’s a shame that our country had to go through this. To be honest, it’s a shame that your president has had to go through this. Before I even got elected, it began. And it began illegally. And hopefully somebody’s gonna look at the other side. This was an illegal takedown that failed. And hopefully, somebody’s going to be looking at the other side. So, it’s complete exoneration. No collusion, no obstruction."

The president who repeatedly decried the Mueller probe as a "witch hunt," also tweeted: "No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!"

This is a developing story; please check back for updates.

Source: Fox News Politics

The mother of a black teenager shot and killed by a white police officer outside Pittsburgh says she went home and "collapsed" after the officer’s acquittal in her son’s death.

Michelle Kenney, mother of 17-year-old Antwon Rose II, joined friends and supporters at a vigil Sunday afternoon at the Hawkins Village housing complex in Rankin.

She said "I haven’t slept in I don’t know how long … And after the verdict was read, I literally went home and I collapsed."

Kenney said she was glad to see her son’s life being celebrated at the spot where he spent so much time. She said anyone looking for Antwon would "find him on the basketball court."

Several dozen people brought red roses, white flowers and candles, and purple ribbons, and they read a poem by Rose, sang and prayed.

Source: Fox News National

Trump administration officials reacted with jubilation Sunday after Attorney General William Barr released the "principal conclusions" of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation into allegations that members of Trump’s 2016 campaign colluded with Russian officials.

According to Barr, the special counsel’s investigation "did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government" or Russia-linked organizations in either "disinformation and social media operations" or "computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the [2016] election."

In his letter, Barr added that he and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein had concluded that evidence collected by Mueller’s investigators "is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense."

White House Director of Social Media Dan Scavino was the first to react to the news, tweeting: "As we already knew, NO COLLUSION! Nothing different from what President @realDonaldTrump has been saying for the past TWO YEARS!!!"

READ THE MUELLER REPORT FINDINGS

Scavino was quickly followed by White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders, who said in a statement: "The Special Counsel did not find any collusion and did not find any obstruction. Attorney General Barr and Deputy Attorney General [Rod] Rosenstein further determined there was no obstruction [of justice]. The findings of the Department of Justice are a total and complete exoneration of the President of the United States.”

President Trump had no immediate reaction to the news.

This is a developing story; check back for more updates.

Source: Fox News Politics

Investigators say a Houston police officer has been charged with murder in the fatal shooting of his librarian wife.

Pearland police said in a statement that the body of 52-year-old Belinda Hernandez was located Saturday by a relative at her home in the Houston suburb. Her husband, 56-year-old Sgt. Hilario Hernandez, was arrested later that day some 230 miles (370 kilometers) away in Kingsville, Texas.

Police say the victim was a librarian at Shadycrest Elementary School.

Pearland police Officer Jason Wells said Sunday that Hernandez is being returned to Brazoria County from Kleberg County, where he was arrested. Wells was unable to provide information on bond or an attorney representing Hernandez.

Kleberg County sheriff’s officials didn’t immediately return messages Sunday. Houston police also didn’t immediately return a message for comment.

Source: Fox News National

The following is Attorney General Bill Barr’s letter to key congressional leaders summarizing the findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation report:

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE LETTER

On Friday, the Special Counsel submitted to me a "confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions" he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. § 600.8(c). This report is entitled "Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election." Although my review is ongoing, I believe that it is in the public interest to describe the report and to summarize the principal conclusions reached by the Special Counsel and the results of his investigation.

The report explains that the· Special Counsel and his staff thoroughly investigated allegations that members of the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump, and others associated with it, conspired with the Russian government in its efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, or sought to obstruct the related federal investigations. In the report, the Special Counsel noted that, in completing his investigation, he employed 19 lawyers who were assisted by a team of approximately 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, and other professional staff. The Special Counsel issued more than 2,800 subpoenas, executed nearly 500 search warrants, obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

The Special Counsel obtained a number of indictments and convictions of individuals and entities in connection with his investigation, all of which have been publicly disclosed. During the course of his investigation, the Special Counsel also referred several matters to other offices for further action. The report does not recommend any further indictments, nor did the Special Counsel obtain any sealed indictments that have yet to be made public. Below, I summarize the principal conclusions set out in the Special Counsel’s report.

Russian Interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. The Special Counsel’s report is divided into two parts. The first describes the results of the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russia’s interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The report outlines the Russian effort to influence the election and documents crimes committed by persons associated with the Russian government in connection with those efforts. The report further explains that a primary consideration for the Special Counsel’s investigation was whether any Americans -including individuals associated with the Trump campaign – joined the Russian conspiracies to influence the election, which would be a federal crime. The Special Counsel’s investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. As the report states: "[T]he investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities."1

The Special Counsel’s investigation determined that there were two main Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election. The first involved attempts by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency (IRA), to conduct disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord, eventually with the aim of interfering with the election. As noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated with the IRA in its efforts, although the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian nationals and entities in connection with these activities.

The second element involved the Russian government’s efforts to conduct computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the election. The Special Counsel found that Russian government actors successfully hacked into computers and obtained emails from persons affiliated with the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party organizations, and publicly disseminated those materials through various intermediaries, including WikiLeaks. Based on these activities, the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian military officers for conspiring to hack into computers in the United States for purposes of influencing the election. But as noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts, despite multiple. offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.

Obstruction of Justice. The report’s second part addresses a number of actions by the President – most of which have been the subject of public reporting – that the Special Counsel investigated as potentially raising obstruction-of-justice concerns. After making a "thorough factual investigation" into these matters, the Special Counsel considered whether to evaluate the conduct under Department standards governing prosecution and declination decisions but ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment. The Special Counsel therefore did not draw a conclusion – one way or the other – as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction. Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leaves unresolved what the Special Counsel views as "difficult issues" of law and fact concerning whether the President’s actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction .. The Special Counsel states that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

The Special Counsel’s decision to describe the facts of his obstruction investigation without reaching any legal conclusions leaves it to the Attorney General to determine whether the conduct described in the report constitutes a crime. Over the course of the investigation, the Special Counsel’s office engaged in discussions with certain Department officials regarding many of the legal and factual matters at issue in the Special Counsel’s obstruction investigation. After reviewing the Special Counsel’s final report on these issues; consulting with Department officials, including the Office of Legal Counsel; and applying the principles of federal prosecution that guide our charging decisions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense. Our determination was made without regard to, and is not based on, the constitutional considerations that surround the indictment and criminal prosecution of a sitting president. 2

In making this determination, we noted that the Special Counsel recognized that "the evidence does not establish that the President was involved in an underlying crime related to Russian election interference," and that, while not determinative, the absence of such evidence bears upon the President’s intent with respect to obstruction. Generally speaking, to obtain and sustain an obstruction conviction, the government would need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a person, acting with corrupt intent, engaged in obstructive conduct with a sufficient nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding. In cataloguing the President’s actions, many of which took place in public view, the report identifies no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department’s principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of­-justice offense.

Status of the Department’s Review

The relevant regulations contemplate that the Special Counsel’s report will be a "confidential report" to the Attorney General. See Office of Special Counsel, 64 Fed. Reg. 37,038, 37,040-41 (July 9, 1999). As I have previously stated, however, I am mindful of the public interest in this matter. For that reason, my goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel’s report as I can consistent with applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

Based on my discussions with the Special Counsel and my initial review, it is apparent that the report contains material that is or could be subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6( e ), which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of information relating to "matter[ s] occurring before [a] grand jury." Fed. R. Crim. P. 6(e)(2)(B). Rule 6(e) generally limits disclosure of certain grand jury information in a criminal investigation and prosecution. Id. Disclosure of 6( e) material beyond the strict limits set forth in the rule is a crime in certain circumstances. See, e.g., 18 U.S.C. § 401(3). This restriction protects the integrity of grand jury proceedings and ensures that the unique and invaluable investigative powers of a grand jury are used strictly for their intended criminal justice function.

Given these restrictions, the schedule for processing the report depends in part on how quickly the Department can identify the 6( e) material that by law cannot be made public. I have requested the assistance of the Special Counsel in identifying all 6( e) information contained in the report as quickly as possible. Separately, I also must identify any information that could impact other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other offices. As soon as that process is complete, I will be in a position to move forward expeditiously in determining what can be released in light of applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

As I observed in my initial notification, the Special Counsel regulations provide that "the Attorney General may determine that public release of’ notifications to your respective Committees "would be in the public interest." 28 C.F.R. § 600.9(c). I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you.

Sincerely, 
William P. Barr Attorney General

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General William Barr on Sunday released the "principal conclusions" of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s completed Russia probe in a bombshell four-page letter to Capitol Hill lawmakers, which stated definitively that Mueller did not establish evidence that President Trump’s team or any associates of the Trump campaign had conspired with Russia – "despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign."

Mueller’s team specifically looked into two Russian efforts to interfere with the 2016 election — first, the work by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency (IRA), to "conduct disinformation and social media operations" designed to "sow discord" in the U.S."

Aaccording to Barr’s letter, "The special counsel’s investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its effort" to interfere with the 2016 presidential election in that manner.

Next, Mueller investigated whether the Trump team was involved in the hacking of emails, many of which were released publicly, that belonged to the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC).

"The Special Counsel did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated" with Russians who worked on those hacking efforts, according to Barr’s letter, "despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign."

Mueller’s report did not reach a conclusion on whether the Trump campaign obstructed justice, and left that decision to Barr and officials at the DOJ. But Mueller "recognized," according to Barr’s letter, that the lack of evidence that Trump was involved in collusion would undercut any obstruction case — which would depend on showing a corrupt intent by the president.

Barr’rs letter concluded: “After reviewing the Special Counsel’s final report on these issues… Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel’s investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense.”

Barr added, "the Special Counsel states that ‘while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does no exonerate him.’"

For Trump, though, who has tweeted more than 230 times that he and his team did not collude with Russians, the moment amounted to a near-total vindication.

Attorney General William Barr leaving his home in McLean, Va., on Sunday morning. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Attorney General William Barr leaving his home in McLean, Va., on Sunday morning. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Barr said Mueller’s team had "thoroughly" investigated allegations that Trump’s team sought to conspire with Russians or obstruct investigators. Mueller said he employed 19 lawyers and approximately 40 FBI agents, executing hundreds of search warrants, 10 pen registers, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

Barr’s disclosure was a capstone moment following the 22-month investigation that ensnared six former Trump advisers and associates — but resulted in no indictments related to collusion with Russia.

The letter promised to settle some of the largest outstanding questions of the Mueller investigation, even as Democrats on Sunday vowed to press on with other investigations, and members of both parties continued to push for the public release of as much of the Mueller report as possible.

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, said Sunday that he believed there remained “significant evidence of collusion” linking the Russian government with President Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. Schiff said Democrats might subpoena Mueller if the full report is not released.

House Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., speaking to "Fox News Sunday," insisted, "So we know a lot of things and maybe it’s not indictable, but we know there was collusion. The question is the degree."

Democrat congressional leaders scrambled to respond to the end of the Mueller probe this weekend, holding an emergency conference call and discussing potential next steps.

A top Democrat on the Senate Judiciary Committee conceded to reporters Saturday that Barr’s release of Mueller’s conclusions likely would be a cause for celebration among President Trump’s supporters — many of whom have stood by the president for more than two years amid a torrent of unproven allegations that the Trump campaign illegally worked with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN OVER MUELLER REPORT — WAS MADDOW CRYING?

"It’s the end of the beginning but it’s not the beginning of the end," Delaware Sen. Chris Coons said, echoing his party’s strategy of moving forward on to other investigations, including probes into Trump’s financial dealings. "Once we get the principal conclusions of the report," he added later, "I think it’s entirely possible that that will be a good day for the president and his core supporters."

Along those lines, Nadler said that Democrats would continue their efforts.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and his wife, Ann, leaving St. John's Episcopal Church, across from the White House, in Washington on Sunday. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller, and his wife, Ann, leaving St. John’s Episcopal Church, across from the White House, in Washington on Sunday. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

"The job of Congress is much broader than the job of the special counsel," Nadler said. "The special counsel is looking and can only look for crimes. We have to protect the rule of law, we have to look for abuses of power, we have to look for obstructions of justice, we have to look for corruption in the exercise of power which may not be crimes."

But House Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Doug Collins, R-Ga., speaking to "Fox News Sunday," argued that Democrats were unlikely to uncover anything Mueller could not.

"As we’ve seen in the first two months of this Congress, [Democrats] really don’t have a policy agenda," Collins said. "They have an agenda against the President. They have an agenda to try and win 2020. And so, what we’re seeing is, they think that they can go into the Judiciary Committee or any other committee and have a limited budget, limited subpoena power, limited staff and go up against an investigation that lasted 22 months, had unlimited power, unlimited subpoena power, had plenty of investigators — and they think they can find something more than what they did, then I think they’re sadly mistaken."

A former senior law enforcement official echoed those remarks, telling Fox News that Democrats would lack key investigative powers that Mueller had, including the ability to convene grand juries — and that Nadler’s path amounted to trying to criminalize meetings with foreign actors that the special counsel apparently determined were simply not criminal.

“With all the talk of the Democrats intensifying their House investigations," the former official said, it was important to note that "unlike Special Counsel Mueller, Congress and the [DOJ Inspector General] cannot convene grand juries and initiate prosecutions. If Mueller couldn’t find collusion or conspiracy with every investigative tool, what do the Democrats expect to accomplish?"

Some conservatives, meanwhile, argued that Democrats should come under increased scrutiny for their contacts with foreign nationals. Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the Democratic National Committee (DNC) hired the firm Fusion GPS, which employed Britsh ex-spy Christopher Steele to produce an anti-Trump dossier that the FBI used to justify the surveillance a top Trump aide and kickstart the Russia probe — even as text messages exclusively obtained by Fox News this week revealed that the DOJ seemingly raised "repeated" concerns that Steele, whose anti-Trump views are now widely known, was politically biased.

The Trump aide, Carter Page, has not been charged with any wrongdoing, although the FBI initially alleged he had conspired with Russians.

On Sunday, Ohio GOP Rep. Jim Jordan said Sunday that if the Mueller report is disclosed publicly, then all documents relating to it should also be published — including the complete Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant application to monitor Page.

"We have asked for that information to be made public a long time ago,” Jordan said in a televised interview.

In a show of confidence, for his part, Trump waved and flashed two thumbs up to supporters as he returned to his Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida on Saturday. The entertainer Kid Rock later uploaded a photograph of his golf outing with Trump earlier in the day.

On Sunday morning, Trump broke an unusual, nearly 40-hour-long Twitter silence, writing simply, "Good Morning, Have A Great Day!"

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

He added, minutes later: "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!"

White House officials told Fox News that Trump then embarked on a golf outing with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., former House Oversight Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., and chief of staff Mick Mulvaney.

This is a breaking story. Check back for updates.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson at the Justice Department and Chris Wallace contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A man who pleaded guilty to the 1988 beating death of a pregnant mother in South Bend, Indiana, has died in jail.

The St. Joseph County prosecutor’s office says 78-year-old George Kearney was found unresponsive Saturday night in the county jail’s medical unit. He was pronounced dead early Sunday.

Authorities say Kearney had been terminally ill and signed an order with jail medical staff to take no lifesaving measures if he stopped breathing.

His guilty plea in the slaying of 28-year-old Miriam Rice came earlier this month. Kearney was in prison for an unrelated crime when he confessed and said his co-defendant, 56-year-old Barbara Brewster, was also responsible. Both were charged last year.

Kearney faced up to 60 years in prison at his sentencing Friday. An autopsy is expected Monday.

Source: Fox News National

The Latest on the 2020 campaign season (all times Eastern):

2:30 p.m.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren says the National Rifle Association is holding "Congress hostage" when it comes to stemming gun violence.

The Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate tells a campaign rally that if seven children were dying from a mysterious virus, "we’d pull out all the stops till we figured out what was wrong." But in terms of gun violence, she says the NRA "keeps calling the shots in Washington."

Warren finished a two-day campaign trip to New Hampshire with an event at middle school in Conway Sunday afternoon.

Warren focused much of her speech on her approach to economics, but paid special attention to unions Sunday. She says more power needs to be put back in the hands of workers.

___

1:50 p.m.

California Sen. Kamala Harris may be dropping a hint on what she thinks about former Vice President Joe Biden, who is considering a third bid for the White House.

At an Atlanta church service Sunday, Harris compared leadership to a relay race in which each generation must ask themselves "what do we do during that period of time when we carry that baton."

Then she added with a smile that for "the older leaders, it also becomes a question of let’s also know when to pass the baton."

Harris is 54 years old. Biden is 76, and some of his supporters have said he’s aware that his age could be a political liability in the Democratic primary. He wouldn’t be the oldest contender, though. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is 77.

___

1:40 p.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand is assailing President Donald Trump as a coward who is "tearing apart the moral fabric of the vulnerable."

The senator is speaking in New York, feet away from one of Trump’s signature properties, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

She says that instead of building walls as Trump wants to do along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans build bridges, community and hope.

Gillibrand also called for full release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report in the Russia investigation. Attorney General William Barr was expected to release a summary of principal conclusions, but Democrats want to see the full details.

Gillibrand is trying to position herself in the crowded field of Democrats seeking the party’s nomination. While some hopefuls have shied away from mentioning Trump, Gillibrand has not hesitated to do so.

___

1:25 p.m.

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke is telling voters in Las Vegas that President Donald Trump bears blame for the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border but responsibility lies with everyone in the country to fix the situation.

O’Rourke spoke Sunday to more than 200 people packed into and snaking around a taco shop on the city’s north end. He says immigrant families are leaving their home countries and journeying on foot because they have no other choice.

The former Texas congressman says desperate families were broken up in the U.S. when they were at their most vulnerable and desperate moments, and what happened to them "is on every single one of us."

___

9 a.m.

As New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand officially kicks off her Democratic presidential campaign in New York City, her rivals are courting voters in early primary states.

Several Democratic White House hopefuls are campaigning Sunday, the day the Justice Department is expected to release key findings from special counsel Robert Mueller’s confidential report on the Russia investigation.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders continues his California swing with a trip to San Francisco.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and former Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper are wrapping up campaign trips to New Hampshire.

California Sen. Kamala Harris is attending a church service before speaking at a rally in Atlanta at Morehouse College.

Source: Fox News National

Indianapolis police revealed Saturday that homicide detectives are leading the investigation into the disappearance of an infant girl reported missing two weeks after she was last seen alive with her mother’s boyfriend.

Police fear the worst because they said 8-month-old Amiah Robertson hasn’t been seen since March 9. They also found "items" of hers along a river bank Wednesday after getting a tip.

"I think that we all hope for the best always, but I think that we can’t ignore the reality of the situation," Lt. Bruce Smith said. "Amiah cannot take care of herself. And absent somebody else who is currently taking care of her that hasn’t come forward, we are very concerned about what happened to her."

FLORIDA DETECTIVES INVESTIGATE MASSAGE PARLOR MURDER, SEEK PERSON OF INTEREST

Police named 20-year-old Robert Lyons as the person who was with Amiah when she was last seen. He is the boyfriend of the girl’s 19-year-old mother, Amber Robertson.

On March 9 Lyons left the babysitter’s with Amiah and then showed up hours later at Robertson’s without her, police said. The next day he allegedly taunted Robertson about Amiah’s whereabouts.

“He is certainly a suspect in her disappearance,” Smith said.

Police said Lyons wasn’t being sought at this time. They said they spoke to him after family reported Amiah missing on March 16.

DETAILS EMERGE AFTER 5 PEOPLE ARE FOUND DEAD IN PENNSYLVANIA APARTMENT, SUGGESTING POSSIBLE ATTEMPT AT MURDER-SUICIDE

Det. Jeannie Burket said Lyons told her where Amiah “should be alive and okay.”

“Some places she was said to be by Robert do not exist,” she said.

Robertson has been cooperative, police said.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Burkert asked for anyone who may have seen Lyons on March 9 to come forward.

Source: Fox News National

Former assistant Watergate prosecutor Jon Sale said on Sunday that President Donald Trump should be very happy with what has so far been revealed from Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian interference into the 2016 election – but warned that this is only “round one.”

Speaking on Fox News’ “America’s Newsroom,” Sale said that the summary of Mueller’s report that is expected to be released on Sunday by Attorney General William Barr could shed more light on what Mueller’s investigation turned up, but will most likely disappoint people looking for more details into any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials in 2016.

“I think in round one, the president should be very happy,” Sale said. “But it’s only round one, and now where are we? We’re waiting for the attorney general to decide what his summary is going to be.”

‘THIS IS A GRAND SLAM:’ TRUMP TEAM ‘CONFIDENT’ NO COLLUSION IN MUELLER REPORT

Sale added: “What [Barr] received from Mueller is, by regulation confidential…What I think he is going to release sometime today may disappoint us as I don’t think it’s going to be as detailed and give the underlying information everybody is waiting for.”

Mueller’s investigation is known to have concluded without a recommendation for further indictments after having snared nearly three dozen people, senior Trump campaign operatives among them. The probe illuminated Russia’s assault on the American political system, painted the Trump campaign as eager to exploit the release of hacked Democratic emails to hurt Hillary Clinton and exposed lies by Trump aides aimed at covering up their Russia-related contacts.

Mueller submitted his report to Barr instead of directly to Congress and the public because, unlike independent counsels such as Ken Starr in the case of President Bill Clinton, his investigation operated under the close supervision of the Justice Department, which appointed him.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Mueller was assigned to the job in May 2017 by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who oversaw much of his work. Barr and Rosenstein analyzed Mueller’s report on Saturday, laboring to condense it into a summary letter of main conclusions.

Barr said he wants to release as much as he can under the law. That decision will require him to weigh the Justice Department’s longstanding protocol of not releasing negative information about people who aren’t indicted against the extraordinary public interest in a criminal investigation into the president and his campaign.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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